Punctures on the trail?


21 replies to this topic
  • GixxerBitch

Posted February 05, 2005 - 11:18 AM

#1

So, what do you lot use when fixing punctures in the middle of nowhere, I mean getting the wheel off and spoonin the tires off seems an impossibility to me?

  • motodude42

Posted February 05, 2005 - 12:21 PM

#2

I am with you. That is why I run heavy duty tubes and do some heavy duty praying so it does not happen to me very often.

  • Gadsen

Posted February 05, 2005 - 12:28 PM

#3

I am with you. That is why I run heavy duty tubes and do some heavy duty praying so it does not happen to me very often.


I dont think I'd ever fix a tire on a trail ride. I'd ride it out to the truck, head home and fix it there. I use Bridgestone Ultra Duty tubes and I know they are so stiff and thick, I'd be able to gently ride out without damaging a rim. And the chances of them going flat is ultra rare

  • GixxerBitch

Posted February 05, 2005 - 12:42 PM

#4

That's useful to know, I think may be an investment in some of heavy duty tubes would be wise.

I have included some tyre levers etc in my tool kit, then I had this thought....'how the &%£$ am I going to fix it when I'm knee deep in shit and surrounded by sheep with very little mechanical knowledge and no bike jack

' I can tell by the look on the sheep's faces what they're thinking!

'Bahhh, he's never quite right riding out here in this weather, 2 legged idiot riding a blue donkey on wheels.....bahhh'!

Cheers :cry:

  • trailriderjoe

Posted February 05, 2005 - 03:37 PM

#5

If your rimlock is holding well you'd be amazed how far you can ride without hurting a Dunlop 756. I personally followed my buddy for 5 miles without him even realizing it (I figured why tell him he was doing really good). The only way I could tell was every once in a while the tire would wash to the left and chatter on the chain. After I told him, he got all nervous and slowed down. We ended up riding another 25 miles back to camp. One new tube and we were back riding later that afternoon with no tire damage!

  • jbrooks26

Posted February 06, 2005 - 06:46 AM

#6

The group of guys I ride with never leave camp without a can of Fixaflat with the extended flexible tube. The can with the nozzle only won't fit into the rim to get it in the tube. This stuff has kept us from turning back on more than 10 occasions. We ride with quads too, and last year my brother was on a Raptor about 5 miles into a trail in northern New Mexico when he tore a quarter sized chunk out of the sidewall of the tire. It did not detach, but the hole was about the size of a quarter and the rubber would lay back into the hole. About 1 can of the magic elixir later and some inventive positioning of the wheel and that tire is still running today!!! This happened on his first ride of the week last June, we rode the rest of the week with no problems. You wouldn't need a large can for a bike, the smaller ones fit real nice in your pack. Hope this helps.

Josh

  • clark4131

Posted February 06, 2005 - 07:00 AM

#7

In my mountain bike, I run something called Stan's NoTubes which completely eliminated any flats whatsoever. I'm going to pour some into my tubes when my '05 arrives. Take a look at the website and tell me what you think...

https://www.notubes.com/home.php


Their demo videos of how this stuff works are amazing. I've done a little experiment myself with a 16-Penny nail and it works. I think it might just solve any annoying flat problem I might run across...SC

  • Dan_Lorenze

Posted February 06, 2005 - 07:23 AM

#8

I fix flats on the trail all the time. The secret is to find a good size rock or tree stump to prop the bike on. When you realize you have a flat the first thing you need to is start looking for the perfect object to set your bike on, don't just stop, find an object then stop. The rest is just like at home, sometimes easier becuause the tire is nice and warm from riding with a flat. Most likely it will take a guy to hold the bike upright and one guy to pull the wheel of and change the tube. I carry CO2 cartridges to fill up the tube and carry two smaller tire irons in my fanny back.

  • PBDBLUE

Posted February 06, 2005 - 07:39 AM

#9

Like Dan says it's no big deal if you carry a good set of irons. If you don't want to fix a rear flat on the trail carry about 4 or 5 BIG zip ties. Put them around the tire and through the spokes and they will keep the rear tire from spinning on the rim (yes even with rim locks). On the front you don't need the ties - just ride on it flat. We've used this trick several times in our group and it works. You can't race it but at least it will get you back.

  • GixxerBitch

Posted February 06, 2005 - 02:44 PM

#10

That had crossed my mind about jacking the bike on some rocks etc, trouble is I do a lot of riding alone so moving the bike around would prove pretty difficult. I like the idea of the tyre sealants, I've seen it for mountain bikes, I guess it would work for the bike too, at least get you back home!

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  • jwriott

Posted February 06, 2005 - 03:07 PM

#11

When I've gotten a flat, it's usually a pinch type and there's 4 holes. Fix a Flat does nothing for these but make a huge mess out of your tire, rim and tube.

I usually just ride back on a flat. On a Maxxis IT, you can go a long ways without air they are so stiff. I've ridden 50 miles on a flat front before.

We've changed tires on the trail as well. Like Dan said, find a rock, stump, log, whatever and prop the bike up. Worst case, lay it over and pull the wheel.

  • Gadsen

Posted February 06, 2005 - 04:34 PM

#12

Tires with the lower aspect ratio (second number ont he tire size) liek the 90 or even the 80/s are much more stouter than the taller sidewalls (100) and also if you do decide to fix a flat by patching, you dotn need to remove the wheel, leave it on the bike, just undo the tire from the rim on one side and pull the tube out and repair it.

  • Sylvain

Posted February 06, 2005 - 05:33 PM

#13

One way to get back is to mount a six ply tire with rim locks. They are a PIA to mount but you will come back. Some type of tire sealent with heavy duty tube will also help.

  • kermit_uk

Posted February 14, 2005 - 06:39 AM

#14

I only do this for REALLY long rides or competitions, might seem like alot of hassle but I have found it really handy. For front (and possibly rear punctures) remove the wheel ahead of time and put one of the fork legs, (preferably not the brake side) through the middle of a new tube and secure it with a zip tie up near the headstock then refit the wheel etc. If you get a front puncture lay the bike on its side (fork with the tube on facing up) and pop one side of the tyre off, cut the old inner tube out and move the new tube from the fork leg into the tyre. Hey presto, a new tube without having to carry it in your pack or remove the wheel. The tube you cut off can be cut up and used with some vulcanising solution for patching future punctures.

  • Indy_WR450

Posted February 14, 2005 - 08:07 AM

#15

Where is David Dialogue! :) He gets more flats in one day then I get all year! :)

  • Dan_Lorenze

Posted February 14, 2005 - 08:31 AM

#16

I only do this for REALLY long rides or competitions, might seem like alot of hassle but I have found it really handy. For front (and possibly rear punctures) remove the wheel ahead of time and put one of the fork legs, (preferably not the brake side) through the middle of a new tube and secure it with a zip tie up near the headstock then refit the wheel etc. If you get a front puncture lay the bike on its side (fork with the tube on facing up) and pop one side of the tyre off, cut the old inner tube out and move the new tube from the fork leg into the tyre. Hey presto, a new tube without having to carry it in your pack or remove the wheel. The tube you cut off can be cut up and used with some vulcanising solution for patching future punctures.


Wow.... GREAT idea... I'm surprised that I haven't seen this marketed before.. Imagine, changing a tube on the trail without removing the wheel...

Kermit, Excellent...

  • ddialogue

Posted February 14, 2005 - 11:57 AM

#17

Where is David Dialogue! :) He gets more flats in one day then I get all year! :p


True...but at least I pack all the parts to fix it on the trail! My problem is when I see rocks I speed up instead of slow down. I'm gonna have to work on that... :)

  • GixxerBitch

Posted February 14, 2005 - 01:19 PM

#18

Cool idea Kermit!

Where in the U.K are you?

  • Jackazz

Posted February 14, 2005 - 01:44 PM

#19

I only do this for REALLY long rides or competitions, might seem like alot of hassle but I have found it really handy. For front (and possibly rear punctures) remove the wheel ahead of time and put one of the fork legs, (preferably not the brake side) through the middle of a new tube and secure it with a zip tie up near the headstock then refit the wheel etc. If you get a front puncture lay the bike on its side (fork with the tube on facing up) and pop one side of the tyre off, cut the old inner tube out and move the new tube from the fork leg into the tyre. Hey presto, a new tube without having to carry it in your pack or remove the wheel. The tube you cut off can be cut up and used with some vulcanising solution for patching future punctures.



I really like this idea. :) I think wrapping a layer of neoprene, or something else around the tube (to protect it from thorns or other abrasions) before zip-tying it to the fork leg, would add a bit of extra protection, so you wouldn't have to worry about the spare tube getting punctured/snagged/ripped before you put it in the tire. :)

Did I mention that I've accidentally ridden through some thorn patches? :p

  • lewichris

Posted February 14, 2005 - 04:14 PM

#20

If your rimlock is holding well you'd be amazed how far you can ride without hurting a Dunlop 756. I personally followed my buddy for 5 miles without him even realizing it (I figured why tell him he was doing really good). The only way I could tell was every once in a while the tire would wash to the left and chatter on the chain. After I told him, he got all nervous and slowed down. We ended up riding another 25 miles back to camp. One new tube and we were back riding later that afternoon with no tire damage!



Rim lock, Oh i see you ride a yz. The wr comes with 2 rim locks for that very reason. TO help you get out if you have a flat. To give a bit more rigity to your tire if it goes flat on you.




 
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