Ranching On a 426???


19 replies to this topic
  • yzfmxer

Posted January 13, 2005 - 07:45 PM

#1

I just looking to see how many people use the Ol' YZF426 , YZF450 or a YZF250F for ranching, or related fields. And what did you do to suspension, and it seems to me that theese beasts do NOT like to start when its cold, and even if you put a heater on it for awhile in the grage and get it warm, and start it up, ride it, then park it and let it cool down, it doesnt want to start?
see I sold my 02 250f and 426f to some ranchers, they are coming off of XR's
they know the XR is a more reliable bike, but at least hoped that they would be able to start the damn things when its cold, they are both jetted corectley. and run GREAT when there warm! But them 2 things they complain about a lot ( starting and suspension) Any advice would be great, and set up tips :cry:

  • jake28

Posted January 13, 2005 - 07:49 PM

#2

Starting fluid-Just a spritz and your fine. They come in 4 ounce bottles that fit in fender bags perfectly.

  • yzfmxer

Posted January 13, 2005 - 08:43 PM

#3

sounds risky?
You live in Cali and you have to use starting fluid?

  • grayracer513

Posted January 13, 2005 - 09:24 PM

#4

A lot of people get so indoctrinated by the "never touch the throttle" dogma that they miss an important step in cold starting. Use the accelerator pump to prime the engine by giving the throttle a good 3-4 twists, push it through once and give it a whack. Works for everyone I know. My 450 starts much better cold than it does hot, frankly.

  • yzfmxer

Posted January 13, 2005 - 09:41 PM

#5

well I see your from cali also,
i live in wyoming im talkin like 30-40 below 0 with the wind chill, im talkin FREEKIN cold, another thing, do you think i should run like a 5-30 oil or somthing preety thin for the winters up here?

  • grayracer513

Posted January 13, 2005 - 11:24 PM

#6

I'd try Shell Rotella Synthetic 5w-40 in that environment. Back out the fuel screw a half turn or so, too, for the starting problem.

  • quartzite

Posted January 14, 2005 - 10:15 AM

#7

I've got a unique way to help start things with the bitter cold. I sewed up 8 or 10 little stuffsacks (2-6" in diameter) with rice inside them. I nuke 'em in a microwave for several minutes and then place them all over the engine block in strategic areas. It's helped a lot, temps in N. Nevada aren't as cold as where you are but I can usually kick it over after a couple times when it's single digits here.

Usually, my routine is to get up, nuke 4 or 5 of the rice bags, put them on the engine, then rotate them after a few minutes with the other set of bags. It's tedious but not as tedious as a bike that won't start...

I got the idea for ricebags when I was having back troubles and went to a back store. You can use dried beans or lentils as well as rice.

I also sewed up some handguards like ATV'ers use with ensolite and denim-that helps keep the wicked winds off my hands. MSR Cold Pros are my favorite gloves for this time of year.

:cry: The guy who mentioned a little throttle is correct IMO as well, I usually give 'er a few twists this time of year.

PM me if you have questions, I'd be willing to send you some ricebags if you don't have access to a sewing machine or someone to help.

  • adrian

Posted January 14, 2005 - 01:10 PM

#8

The other night i went to fire up my beast and it was -12 out.Two blips of the throttle with the choke out and she fired up no problem. If she starts and stalls right away just do the procedure again. Sounds like the rancher guys arent to 4 stroke smart, don't let them keep hasseling you either, I've been there before and they will keep calling you on everything,pretty soon they will want there money back sighting you sold them junk. Just educate them to the best of your ability and tell them that you are done helping them and there is a great place called TT for any more help!!:cry:
Oh yah running a thin weight oil for winter is a good idea, the suspension will be stiff in winter as well because it darn cold out and it needs heat to get them working properly! Ever notice when it's cold outside that an o-ring chain doesnt spin as nice either??:cry:

  • beezer

Posted January 14, 2005 - 01:22 PM

#9

I have buddies that ice race and they put the truck exhaust pointing at the motor of the bike.

  • yzfmxer

Posted January 15, 2005 - 02:02 PM

#10

No, There 4 stroke smart, smarter then most, The one on the 426 also has a CRF 450, but it gets pampered and kept warm all the time. they are also my best friends, so I cant just tell them to leave me alone, They dont expect me to do anything, but i just want them to be happy with my old bikes, and i like to help them out with simple isues with the bikes. They have never had any problems stating there XR's in the freezing cold, they didnt need to use anything special to get em' running. And thats what I realy want to know, Is there any way to get these Yamahas to start in the cold, without doing anyting more than kicking it over. I mean the XR's do it so why cant the yamahas do it?? :cry:

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  • MXof21

Posted January 16, 2005 - 05:24 AM

#11

It's 10 degree this morning in Michigan and I am headed riding at an indoor track. First step, turn your idle screw in one full turn. I will probably need to give my 450 about 4 blips, it will start, studder and stop. A couple more blips and a good kick and I should be running. Once it warms up back the idle back to normal and you are good to go.

  • Chris_from_Oz

Posted January 16, 2005 - 05:46 AM

#12

No, There 4 stroke smart, smarter then most, The one on the 426 also has a CRF 450, but it gets pampered and kept warm all the time. they are also my best friends, so I cant just tell them to leave me alone, They dont expect me to do anything, but i just want them to be happy with my old bikes, and i like to help them out with simple isues with the bikes. They have never had any problems stating there XR's in the freezing cold, they didnt need to use anything special to get em' running. And thats what I realy want to know, Is there any way to get these Yamahas to start in the cold, without doing anyting more than kicking it over. I mean the XR's do it so why cant the yamahas do it?? :cry:

XR = super reliable, air cooled
WR/YZF's = water cooled, higher maintenance race bikes
My 426 is more temperature sensitive than ANY bike i've ever owned.....fuel screw on mine gets a decent workout whenever temp's/humidity changes.

  • cabage

Posted January 16, 2005 - 06:54 AM

#13

The way I start mine is hold the decompression lever in and kick her over 5 times, than find top centre and kick her through, starts first time. Good luck

  • yzfmxer

Posted January 16, 2005 - 12:10 PM

#14

I realive the XR's are a more reliable bike, But starting is another isue. Im mean they both have valves, fuel, and spark, I just want to get teese bikes to start in the cold like the XR's do. IS IT POSIBLE ??

  • 426mankiller

Posted January 16, 2005 - 12:42 PM

#15

Yes you can get a yz to start in the cold, but you are comparing a trail bike (xr) to a racing bike (yz) with a super-fine-tuned-engine-to-the-hilt, so starting in extreme conditions may be a little tricky. All I can say is if you need a 426 to do your ranching you either have some pretty fast cattle or you are in a big hurry to get to the house and back!!!

  • firezwr426

Posted January 16, 2005 - 01:03 PM

#16

maybe just a shot in the dark, but maybe you should rejet for the winter.. cold air = more dense air... more air needs more fuel...
I also like to hold in the decomp lever and kick the bike several times at least to get the oil moving around and into the head and whatnot... lighter weight oil will help too...

  • yzfmxer

Posted January 16, 2005 - 09:43 PM

#17

Well. thanks for all the info, I know it needs lighter oil, so i will run a synthetic 5w 30. The reason they bought the YZF's is because they wanted more usable power, they ranch on some wicked land, alot of hills, cliffs, BIG ASS drainages, and they like to do alittle hill climbing while there at it. I installed a 14oz flywheel weight on the 426, so its all tame now, you can lug that thing like a tractor, excelent for trailing cows! But whats not excelent is the suspension!!! its verry harsh for crusing accross the praie, what would yall recomend for making the suspension kinda like an XR's verry soft all the way throught the stroke, but i would like some bottoming resistance.
Ryan

  • 426mankiller

Posted January 17, 2005 - 05:38 PM

#18

Go to this website for excellent tips on setting up your suspension.

http://motoman393.th...suspension.html

If the bike is set up for MX it probably has alot of compression and slow rebound dialed into it. Try running less compression and faster rebound front and rear for a more plush ride.:cry:

  • yzfmxer

Posted January 17, 2005 - 09:18 PM

#19

I had the suspension re sprung and revalved for my weight by MX TECH about 6 months before i sold it, but i put the stock springs back in, but do you think that MX TECH uses a universal valving, and then springs it for the riders weight, or is the valving also for your weight??

  • 426mankiller

Posted January 18, 2005 - 04:55 PM

#20

The only purpose of the springs is to set the static ride height of the motorcycle with the rider-- your valving is what determines how stiff or soft the ride will be. If your replacement springs put your bike at the correct sag front and rear, then you should use them. What type of riding did you have your revalve done for?? Were the forks revalved for landings off of 90 foot triple jumps or for trail riding? "Revalve" is a very general term that depends on what you tell the person doing the work what type of riding you are doing. If the revalve suits your riding style and the springs can be set at the proper sag within their specs then you just need to adjust your compression and rebound to get a satisfactory ride. Good Luck!!!





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