More 05 free mod ???'s from FNG


39 replies to this topic
  • stonewall

Posted January 05, 2005 - 08:50 AM

#1

Hi all,

I just made the switch to blue after many years on red and orange bikes. The last Yamaha I had was a TT500 from way back in the day. My how things have changed. I have been reading all the posts about the free mods and how corked up the bike was and was getting a little worried. Either I'm missing something or everyone is making this stuff sound too hard. My XR650R required just as much or more to get it running right too.

I have yanked the airbox baffle, set the fuel screw, pulled the exhaust baffle and this thing is running pretty crisp and strong. I am around 2500' and the jetting feels real close stock. I think I could go up one on the pilot but otherwise it runs strong and smooth. I will be getting a '04 needle so I have some adjustment there and the Lowedog kit is on the way. The manual says the main jet is a 165, Indy, others,
do you think thats close to right for my elevation? I remember reading an earlier post where Indy told someone to drop back to a 165.

I'm also confused about why people are drilling out the rivets on the exhaust.
I just pulled the baffle and put the spark arrestor back. That made a major change without removing the rivets. Am I missing something? Thanks for sharing the knowledge. :cry:

  • Texas4play

Posted January 05, 2005 - 09:20 AM

#2

I'm assuming you did the throttle stop and gray wire mod as well. I read a thread where people were drilling rivets and don't know why. I pulled the baffle (snorkle) and that's it on the exhaust mod part. The lowedog mod will take care of backfiring. I strongly recommend the JD jet kit and the zipty fuel screw for carb tuning. Use the YZ guidelines for settings.

  • stonewall

Posted January 05, 2005 - 09:48 AM

#3

Yeah I forgot to add those to the list of things I've done. The throttle stop was the first thing to go. The jetting just seems so close that I'm not sure the JD kit is necessary.

  • Texas4play

Posted January 05, 2005 - 10:17 AM

#4

It should be called the JD needle kit because it's all in his needles. The tapers are unique and quality unmatched. The main jets you get with kit give you variety. I'm not trying to sell you his kit but, if you'd have no regrets if you did.

  • elton

Posted January 06, 2005 - 04:12 AM

#5

I have the same question regarding the "free mod" to the exhaust on my 05 WR450F.

I printed the thumpertalk.faq that was recommended, showing the mods (on a WR250), took it to my dealer and had them do the mods with the first service.

I just got the bike back last night, have not cranked it since the mods.

However, they did not drill the rivet and remove the "black baffle restrictor"; they removed the entire baffle -- is this OK? Any downside vs. just removing the black restrictor that's riveted into the baffle, as outlined in the mods FAQ?

Thanks,

Elton

  • Texas4play

Posted January 06, 2005 - 06:50 AM

#6

Elton,

They just removed the snorkle right (curved half inch tube with mount plate welded to middle approx)?? If so, that's all you need pulled. The thing to know about the FAQ is the exhaust on 04's and prior are different. For kicks, you might want to roll your sleeves up, grab a metric set of hex wrenches and unscrew the muffle end pipe just to see whats going on in there. Don't mess with the rivets just the screws. Try doing some of your bike work. It will empower your confidence and boost your understanding.

  • elton

Posted January 06, 2005 - 07:40 AM

#7

Elton,

They just removed the snorkle right (curved half inch tube with mount plate welded to middle approx)?? If so, that's all you need pulled. The thing to know about the FAQ is the exhaust on 04's and prior are different.

Yes, that's what they removed. The FAQ, updated for the 2005 WR, shows them leaving this "snorkel" installed, but drilling a rivet, and removing the black insert, inside the "snorkel" – thus I was concerned.

Elton,

Try doing some of your bike work. It will empower your confidence and boost your understanding.

You guys here are amazing; taking apart these (IMO) complicated machines and doing all sorts of mods yourself. If I did such I would mess it up or the bike would fall apart when I’m riding it hard. I want the best mechanic I know to work on my new 05 WR450 given my fondness for the bike. I’m not competent to work on lawn mowers (but I appreciate your advice) :cry:

Thanks,

Elton

  • 450_James

Posted January 06, 2005 - 09:20 AM

#8

As soon as you can snach the snorkel from the palm of my hand you can leave the Shaolin Temple. :cry:

In order to become one with your WR you must do the mod's yourself. :cry:

  • mark2025

Posted January 06, 2005 - 09:27 AM

#9

Elton - for most of these mods, if you can Start your lawn more without help...you are skilled enough to do them (with the help/info on here). :cry:

  • elton

Posted January 06, 2005 - 10:10 AM

#10

In order to become one with your WR you must do the mod's yourself. :cry:

Well, I have the garage refrig. full of "Miller High Life"; just need to get some tools :cry:

As soon as you can snach the snorkel from the palm of my hand you can leave the Shaolin Temple. :cry:

That's my problem, I've spent my time in Karate/Kung Fu/Kickboxing dojo's, and not enough time learning the how to dismantle dirt-bikes. But I'm getting focused :cry:


Elton

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  • RichBaker

Posted January 06, 2005 - 03:25 PM

#11

You're not missing a thing.......the others are just not mechanically inclined...

  • 450_James

Posted January 07, 2005 - 02:14 AM

#12

Cut out the bottom of a couple of those Miller bottles and mount them to some safty goggles. That should help ya get focused :cry: :cry:

  • elton

Posted January 07, 2005 - 04:20 AM

#13

This is a bit off topic, but I'll ask anyway. I may get another WR450 within the year and pass my current 05 to my son if he outgrows his CRF230.

I thought I would get the WR or look at the CRF450X when it arrives. However, I have seen references here to the KTM 525 EXC -- but I know nothing about KTM (not even where they are made).

The KTM board here is a bit biased; would prefer a WR owner to tell me how the KTM 525 EXC would compare to the 05 WR450.

Also, do KTM's require similar mods to run at full power?

Thanks,

Elton

  • Texas4play

Posted January 07, 2005 - 08:58 AM

#14

As soon as you can snach the snorkel from the palm of my hand you can leave the Shaolin Temple. :cry:

In order to become one with your WR you must do the mod's yourself. :cry:



This guy cracked me up!

  • elton

Posted January 07, 2005 - 08:54 PM

#15

I thought I was done with mods (disconnect the grey wire, remove the baffle, shortening the throttle-stop and remove the air-box snorkel), but after reading many WR posts here, it appears I need two more mods.

The conventional wisdom is that the WR needs to be Re-Jetted using the JD Kit, and that I need to remove the AIS using the LOWEDOG kit. Are there any downsides to these mods?


Elton

  • jasilva

Posted January 08, 2005 - 01:13 PM

#16

I thought I was done with mods (disconnect the grey wire, remove the baffle, shortening the throttle-stop and remove the air-box snorkel), but after reading many WR posts here, it appears I need two more mods.

The conventional wisdom is that the WR needs to be Re-Jetted using the JD Kit, and that I need to remove the AIS using the LOWEDOG kit. Are there any downsides to these mods?


Elton


Only if you consider no more deceleration backfire and quicker throttle response a downside.:cry:

Joe

  • elton

Posted January 08, 2005 - 05:00 PM

#17

Today was my first ride after doing the "free mods" (exhaust baffle, throttle-stop, grey wire, airbox snorkel) -- expecting the "beast to be unleashed". I initially thought, the now WZ was no big deal (thinking my old school, 1977..ish KX250 MX'er, the last bike I've owned, was hotter and would be on top of you in any gear with the twist of the throttle if not careful).

As the ride progressed I started getting more impressed. Then I realized that my first 100 miles "corked", trained me to stop the throttle halfway. I started deliberately using the extra available throttle -- was very impressed!

The bike is now very fast, pulls hard in ever gear and if it were not a soggy day it would have been a unicycle vs. blowing a rooster trail of grass and mud -- was amazed by the end of the day.

Until you remove the exhaust baffle, you don't notice the backfiring -- thus its obvious that I need to remove the AIS using the LOWEDOG kit(if I can get it). However, I'm unsure if I need the JD Kit jetting, since the bike appears to run perfectly. How do you know if you need jetting, how do you know if its running lean from the factory as many say?


Elton

  • elton

Posted January 27, 2005 - 09:38 AM

#18

<<snip>>...I'm unsure if I need the JD Kit jetting, since the bike appears to run perfectly. How do you know if you need jetting, how do you know if its running lean from the factory as many say?


Anyone?

Elton

  • Jackazz

Posted January 27, 2005 - 10:06 AM

#19

I won't bag on JD, as I haven't tried his kit, but I've heard alot of guys going to the STD '04 YZ needle with normal jet changes. If you allready bought different jets, it's cheaper, as you can buy the YZ needle for about $10. I'm gonna give it a try this spring & see how it works. If I feel like I still need help after that I'll call Mr. Dean. :cry:

  • RADRick

Posted January 27, 2005 - 12:55 PM

#20

You guys here are amazing; taking apart these (IMO) complicated machines and doing all sorts of mods yourself. If I did such I would mess it up or the bike would fall apart when I’m riding it hard. I want the best mechanic I know to work on my new 05 WR450 given my fondness for the bike. I’m not competent to work on lawn mowers (but I appreciate your advice)


Personally, I'm of the belief that if you can ride it, you should be able to fix it. Well, at least the simple stuff like maintenance and minor repairs. On a vehicle that may take you miles from anywhere and possibly leave you stranded, knowing how to fix some of the things that go wrong yourself is an invaluable skill. At a minimum, knowing what's involved in a repair will give you a better understanding when it comes time to take it to a shop. You're less likely to be taken advantage of if it appears you know what you're talking about when you drop it off at the dealer.




 
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