Mods to 03 WR450 and in what order!


18 replies to this topic
  • L8TBRKR

Posted December 31, 2004 - 04:36 PM

#1

I've read a few threads with people wanting to know what others have done to their bikes. I would like to know what others have done and in what order they did the mods/changes. I'm not talking the free mods, I've done them (well, ok, 90% of them, still not sure about the gray wire). What else have you done/added to your bike and in what order of importance... to you. For me, I think suspension (spring rate & fine tuning) first. Then ???. I like to go through the threads and read peoples opinions on different add-ons. An example would be the Power-Now. It sounds like, for the most part, a waste of $100. For most people it sounds like the gains were negligible. So what would you put the $100 toward? Steering stabilizer? Stainless oil filter? Exhaust system? JD jet kit? BTW, this should include any mods you've done yourself that you built. My homebuilt one was the mod to my CAN version exhaust. Removed one baffle, built a spark arrestor for it and installed a larger tip. The internet is great for getting ideas! So lets here what you've done and the order of importance for you.

  • simon@vic

Posted December 31, 2004 - 04:50 PM

#2

if you have a 2003 do this.

http://www.wr450.com...inals/index.htm

04 starter conversion.

  • jerryls

Posted December 31, 2004 - 04:55 PM

#3

I've done everything but the exhaust (and probably won't). If I could do it all over again, this is the order I would do it in:

1. JD jetting
2. Cycra Handguards w/ triple clamp mounts
2. Steering Stabilizer (I consider riding w/ it as important as wearing a helmet)
3. Suspension (you don't realize how crappy the stock setup is until you revalve and respring, I'd recommend Dicks Racing).
4. Rekluse clutch- only had it for one day, but this thing makes riding so much easier.
5. All the other stuff. By the way, the Powernow makes a noticable difference once you drill the extra hole in the plate.

I forgot one thing: before you ever ride the bike, get rid of Dunlop 739 on the front. Just an aweful tire.

  • L8TBRKR

Posted December 31, 2004 - 08:21 PM

#4

I've done everything but the exhaust (and probably won't). If I could do it all over again, this is the order I would do it in:

1. JD jetting
2. Cycra Handguards w/ triple clamp mounts
2. Steering Stabilizer (I consider riding w/ it as important as wearing a helmet)
3. Suspension (you don't realize how crappy the stock setup is until you revalve and respring, I'd recommend Dicks Racing).
4. Rekluse clutch- only had it for one day, but this thing makes riding so much easier.
5. All the other stuff. By the way, the Powernow makes a noticable difference once you drill the extra hole in the plate.

I forgot one thing: before you ever ride the bike, get rid of Dunlop 739 on the front. Just an aweful tire.


Why wouldn't you do anything with the exhaust? Mine ended up a little noisier but I don't think it's too bad. But it made quite a noticeable difference in the power/torque. It feels much more snappier now and pulls harder all the way through the power curve.

As for the JD jetting... does it really make that much difference. I do notice some hesitation at 1/4 to 1/2 throttle when holding it at a steady RPM. But that's nothing that can't be fixed with your standard jetting adjustments... isn't it.

I've had the bike for about 4 months now and just can't seem to see where I would need a steering stabilizer. I've never had a problem with hitting roots or rocks and the bars wanting to be yanked out of my hands. Even for high speed runs I've never had any headshake or anything like that. What type of riding are you doing. Why do you rank it so high on your list.

Suspension, I think, is #1. I'm a little confused with the revalving issue though. Some guys say yes and others say no. Obviously you need to have the right spring rates to start with, but many people feel that the valving that is in the new equipment does just fine. Now I realize every rider and riding situation is different, so that is why I can't see how the stock valving can be good for everyone. Especially if you are a really fast rider. That being said, I'm not a pro rider, so would I take advantage of having a perfectly tuned suspension?

The PowerNow for the 2003... is it a sleeve that slides in the carb. I've tried to find some pictures but they always seem to show the same ones. I understand that they can be a little different depending on the application. I also understand that you can not make it like others have done with other years of WR's. Is this true?

I've pretty much had my use out of the Dunlop and look forward to something else!!! :cry: I'm looking at getting the Maxxis MaxxCross I/T tires. I've read elsewhere that they are a very descent tire for the money. What are your thoughts on this tire?

  • L8TBRKR

Posted December 31, 2004 - 08:25 PM

#5

if you have a 2003 do this.

http://www.wr450.com...inals/index.htm

04 starter conversion.


I've lapped the shaft with valve lapping compound and retorqued. I never had a problem to begin with just thought better safe then sorry. Is the 2004 conversion really necessary if you've never had a problem? I have about 30 hrs on the bike so far. I had about 22 hrs when I did the fix.

  • Indy_WR450

Posted January 01, 2005 - 07:34 AM

#6

I've lapped the shaft with valve lapping compound and retorqued. I never had a problem to begin with just thought better safe then sorry. Is the 2004 conversion really necessary if you've never had a problem? I have about 30 hrs on the bike so far. I had about 22 hrs when I did the fix.


Absloutley necessary. Do the 04 upgrade and prevent your engine case from cracking and busting now that the key and flywheel are lapped and loctited the backfire energy will brake something else! Yamaha should be shot for that TSB bandaid. I would rather replace a key than an engine case! :cry:

  • jerryls

Posted January 01, 2005 - 10:18 AM

#7

I don't see the need for an aftermarket exhaust. The stock system with a PMB insert (and correct jetting) produces more than enough power for me. And I don't annoy the neighbors when I ride it down the street.

The advantage of the JD kit is that you just put it in and it works. You're right, you can achieve the same effect by experimenting with different needles and jets. There used to be a jetting thread by Taffy that followed his endless quest for the perfect jetting. After reading it, I decided it was easier to just pay the money up front and buy the JD kit.

A steering stabilizer allows you to ride faster and safer. I race hare scrambles and trail ride in the desert and mountains, and can't imagine riding without one. When I ride friends' bikes without stabilizers (regardless of make/model), I find myself going slower and riding much more cautious. On the bikes that have a stabilizer, I find that I can hop on and blast down the trail. Buy one, ride it for a couple months, and if you don't like it, you can sell it on ebay without taking much of a loss.

Suspension: if you respring, you have to revalve. The stock valving is set for the stock spring rates. I put a stiffer rear spring in and it just overpowered the rebound valving. Even with the rebound cranked all the way up, the spring was still to strong for it. You're right about the stock valving being adequate, but it does need to professionally redone (restacked). I won't waste money buying aftermarket valves. I still can't believe how smooth and plush my suspension is now. It used to feel like driving a dump truck.

If you don't want to shell out the cash for the powernow, go here http://www.thumperfaq.com/jamesnow.htm and make your own for almost nothing.

Maxxis IT are great all around tires, and more importantly, really cheap! That's what I usually run. My favorite rear tire is the IRC M5B. It's about the same cost as the Maxxis, but you can wear one out in a weekend :cry: . A guy that rides professional hillclimbs recommended it. Traction is so good I can hardly keep the front tire on the ground. But getting a new tire delivered every week is kinda hard to explain to the missus.

  • simon@vic

Posted January 01, 2005 - 10:51 AM

#8

I've lapped the shaft with valve lapping compound and retorqued. I never had a problem to begin with just thought better safe then sorry. Is the 2004 conversion really necessary if you've never had a problem?


YES!!!!!~

  • kincade

Posted January 04, 2005 - 12:07 PM

#9

I'm wondering if I can ask a few questions about the mods suggested above... I've been reading up here for a few months, but I'm still a little behind. :cry: I bought an 03 wr450 a few months ago, and want to get it ready for springtime!

I've seen the 04 starter mod, but WHY is it necessary? Is this the same issue as the woodruff key?

Steering stablizer; which one do you recommend? Scotts?

Revalving and respringing; do you buy new springs AND shocks, or just new valve kits? Who should I have do the restacking?

What is the Powernow?

What is the PMB insert for the stock exhaust? I have my baffle out, but it's too dang loud; with the stock one in, it's a dog.

Thanks in advance; hopefully these aren't too basic for you guys! I can throw a supercharged EFI motor into an old vehicle, but I still don't know enough about these bikes to avoid sounding like an idiot...

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  • Indy_WR450

Posted January 04, 2005 - 02:02 PM

#10

I've seen the 04 starter mod, but WHY is it necessary? Is this the same issue as the woodruff key?

Steering stablizer; which one do you recommend? Scotts?

Revalving and respringing; do you buy new springs AND shocks, or just new valve kits? Who should I have do the restacking?

What is the Powernow?

What is the PMB insert for the stock exhaust? I have my baffle out, but it's too dang loud; with the stock one in, it's a dog.


If you dont do the 04 upgrade you can damage you engine case, starter gear, starter clutch or woodruf key. There is no design consideration for a backfire during starting or running which creates the break. :cry:

I like the Scotts damper. :cry:

I would just ride your suspension stock and see what changes you need to make for your riding style and speed. Suspension forum has great info if you know what handling problems you are having. :cry:

The Powernow is an insert which goes in the front bore of your carb (and the rear bore for the Powernow plus) This allows your bike better partial throttle response by behaving more like a small carb at partial slide openings. Great feature for technical slow riding! :cry:

Get an insert that will quiet your pipe down the Pro Moto Billet is real popular and many TT members use it. :cry:

  • Dan_Lorenze

Posted January 04, 2005 - 02:12 PM

#11

I've lapped the shaft with valve lapping compound and retorqued. I never had a problem to begin with just thought better safe then sorry. Is the 2004 conversion really necessary if you've never had a problem? I have about 30 hrs on the bike so far. I had about 22 hrs when I did the fix.



This in an understatement!!!!! DO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


My buddy bought his dad a used 03 with a mile on it.. Basically brand new... I told him to do this, over and over again but he didn't bother to. A few miles into the ride, KABOOM.................. The key sheared. Fix it and don't think you can get away without fixing it. No mod is more important than fixing this little problem Yamaha had in 2003...

Dan :cry:

  • kincade

Posted January 04, 2005 - 06:40 PM

#12

Hmmmm; so the backfire/starter issue is not the same as the woodruff key issue? I'd need to do this AND take it in to Yamaha to get the woodruff key done?

Thanks for the other tips; powernow sounds pretty neat!

  • Indy_WR450

Posted January 04, 2005 - 07:28 PM

#13

It is the same issue just a slightly different variation. Forget the TSB service on the key. Just upgrade to 04 starter design! :cry:

  • L8TBRKR

Posted January 04, 2005 - 08:03 PM

#14

After reading the many threads on the woodruff key failure, you would think that yamaha would have come up with a better fix. Yamaha should have to flip the bill to replace the parts with 2004 parts. It would be different if it was a rare occasion, but apparently every 2003 MUST have it done so this is obviously a design flaw.

  • mtrablue

Posted January 04, 2005 - 08:40 PM

#15

the '03 has plenty of things that need to be fixed. the starter issue is the difference of getting back to the truck or not. the rest is up to you. and yes, yamaha should have fixed all of our bikes. we'll open some old wounds if get in to that.

the jetting is terrible stock. i'd have to make that number 2 on the '03 list. the JD kit does wonders for the bike, but there's more to the jetting than just that. if you want the best results you need to look up the threads on the leak jet and the pilot air jet to round out your jetting.

from there you have to set the bike up to you and your riding. how big are you? if your around 200lbs. you'll need a heavier spring on the back to get preload and ride height correct. probably a 5.8. that big a spring might blow through your stock damping in the rear end. re-valve. you see where i'm going with this. it's not as easy as just bolting something on.

i have a power now. i couldn't tell you that it's the best thing i ever did. but....... i also have a twin-air back fire air filter with the stock screen cut out of the cage . i also have the handle hole cut out of the left side number plate/side cover and the air box opened up via the "indy air box mod". i doubt any one of these make a lot of difference but together they sure do.

at the very least get the pmb or gytr exhaust insert. after market is up to you. you have to decide how much noise you can handle.

get rid of the stock bars, grips, air filter, and front tire.

  • kincade

Posted January 04, 2005 - 10:08 PM

#16

the '03 has plenty of things that need to be fixed. the starter issue is the difference of getting back to the truck or not. the rest is up to you. and yes, yamaha should have fixed all of our bikes. we'll open some old wounds if get in to that.

the jetting is terrible stock. i'd have to make that number 2 on the '03 list. the JD kit does wonders for the bike, but there's more to the jetting than just that. if you want the best results you need to look up the threads on the leak jet and the pilot air jet to round out your jetting.

from there you have to set the bike up to you and your riding. how big are you? if your around 200lbs. you'll need a heavier spring on the back to get preload and ride height correct. probably a 5.8. that big a spring might blow through your stock damping in the rear end. re-valve. you see where i'm going with this. it's not as easy as just bolting something on.

i have a power now. i couldn't tell you that it's the best thing i ever did. but....... i also have a twin-air back fire air filter with the stock screen cut out of the cage . i also have the handle hole cut out of the left side number plate/side cover and the air box opened up via the "indy air box mod". i doubt any one of these make a lot of difference but together they sure do.

at the very least get the pmb or gytr exhaust insert. after market is up to you. you have to decide how much noise you can handle.

get rid of the stock bars, grips, air filter, and front tire.



Hmmm, sounds like the fix is a no-brainer. I was already planning on the JD kit whether or not I sell it or go w/ an '04.

I'm not too big - 5'8" and 160#; I'm not sure how much suspension work it would actually need.

What's wrong w/ the bars, airfilter, and front tire?

  • 450high

Posted January 05, 2005 - 01:27 AM

#17

The 04 mod is not needed.Well thats what i thought.Very hot day and 7 km's pushing and pulling out of a mountan range , cursing and swwearing.Not to mention the amount of yamaha jokes from my mates.HELL YES IT WAS OBVIOSLY NEEDED.Pitty i didn't relise that earlier.I had 700 k's on mine and thought i was safe.
Ride fast - Ride safe

  • mtrablue

Posted January 05, 2005 - 05:43 PM

#18

What's wrong w/ the bars, airfilter, and front tire?



all three are junk. the bars are soft and will only last one crash. weird bend also. the air filter will be cut by the sealing edge of the cage before too long. go with a twin-air or uni. unless you live and ride in the desert, the stock 739 will put you on your head. when you first ride with them they seem OK. they just don't give you any warning when they let go. about the second or third time you loose the front end you realize it's that damn tire. the 742 is a huge improvement from dunlop.

another couple of things to look for on both the '03 and '04. there are what appear to be four breather tubes coming from the carb. there are really only two vent holes in the carb but "T" fittings are used. take the two longer tubes and run then up by the top of the air box. if your in deep water, the hoses will be in the water and bike will run poorly. they are known to stall also. moving the hoses will let the carb vent properly.

the other thing to look for is the breather hose off the valve cover. the one that runs down the frame. if you stall in a creek and the hose end is in the water, you will suck water when you hit the starter button. a bad bad thing. some owners have run the hose to the air box, like an '05. others (me for one) put in a "T" fitting and run an extra bit of hose up by the radiator. don't put the "T" in too low. if it's in the water, it won't help.

  • unkle_george

Posted January 06, 2005 - 12:34 AM

#19

I also cut out the holes that are marked on the passenger side of the airbox.
It leaned up my jetting, and the filter gets dirty faster, so I know it's breathing better now.
The Gray wire mod is quick & free and will give you more snap as well.
If you change to a YZ rear fender and aftermarket pipe, you'll lose ~5lbs+ out where it has the most leverage against you.

I also run with my antifreeze tank almost dry, expecially in the winter months when too cold to need the extra fluid anyways.

Also, I don't know how Yamaha can duplicate the softness of fresh bread out of the oven when making radiators... but guards for them are cheap compared to fixing holes or replacing them.

Enjoy your new toy
- Ryan




 
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