Inch Pound to Foot pound ?


12 replies to this topic
  • socal_250f_racer

Posted December 16, 2004 - 05:23 PM

#1

I was not aware that you needed an inch pound torq wrench when installing the bolts onto the forks and now that I have my gold valves I cant install them. No one seems to have one to rent or buy really. I heard they were really expensive anyway. Well anyway my question is, is there a way to convert inch pound into foot pound? My best guess would be divide it by twelve since there is twelve inches in a foot? Or can you just torq it down by hand? Race tech recommends 30-48 inch pounds so it sounds like it isnt to precise. Any help is appreciated because I am not sure i want to spend 20 bucks to have a shop torq 2 bolts down for me.

  • SC_Spode

Posted December 16, 2004 - 05:32 PM

#2

One ft-lb = 12 inch-lbs.

So, 3 ft-lbs = 36 inch-lbs.

The nuts for your Gold Valves need be barely more than snug at 30-48 in-lbs. You may want to apply a drop of low strength Loctite to the threads to help prevent loosening. Make sure it's dry before filling the forks with oil.

FWIW, I believe Sears has a model (Digitork?) that goes up to like 250 in-lbs, seems to be reasonably accurate and fairly inexpensive for the layman that doesn't make his living with it or require highly accurate torques.

:cry:

  • socal_250f_racer

Posted December 17, 2004 - 05:35 PM

#3

Thanks for your help man. Fortunatly my dad had an ich pound wrench front work and he brought it home. Unfortunatly it doesnt measure below 100 inch pounds. How important is it, that you have exactly 48 inch pounds. Is this only so you dont strip the bolt, since its being threaded onto an aluminum shaft? Or does it have to be 48 inch pounds because thats how much force the valves and shims must have?

I forgot to add that I talked to an x-motorycle mechanic and he said that he did it many times and it gives you the torque specs so you dont strip it. He said just what you said about just barley going over snug.

  • SC_Spode

Posted December 17, 2004 - 06:10 PM

#4

Your upper value is 48 in-lbs, which is 60% more than the lower value. Percentage-wise, this is a pretty wide spread. What it's telling me is that you want it tight enough to keep it from coming loose but not tight enough to strip the post or snap it off.

You can virtually tighten it finger tight and then snug it with a deepwell socket by hand, without the ratchet. It really isn't that tight.

A drop of low strength threadlocker on the post will help prevent it from loosening. Again, let it dry before assembling in the fork. Some people don't like this because they're afraid it might snap the post when removing the nut.
If you use a small drop of low strength locking agent on the post, you shouldn't have a problem

I never have! :cry:

:cry:

  • skipn8r

Posted December 17, 2004 - 11:09 PM

#5

I suggest the Craftsman 944593. It's a 3/8" clicker type that goes from 25 inch-pounds (~ 2 ft-lb) to 250 inch-pounds (~20 ft-lb) which pretty much covers 75% of the torque specs you'll use on a bike. Craftsman isn't Snap-On quality, but then again, it only costs about $70.

  • SC_Spode

Posted December 18, 2004 - 07:21 AM

#6

I suggest the Craftsman 944593. It's a 3/8" clicker type that goes from 25 inch-pounds (~ 2 ft-lb) to 250 inch-pounds (~20 ft-lb) which pretty much covers 75% of the torque specs you'll use on a bike. Craftsman isn't Snap-On quality, but then again, it only costs about $70.


That's the one I was talking about! :cry:

:cry:

  • onebadmust

Posted December 18, 2004 - 08:04 AM

#7

If you guys are talking about the upper fork pinch bolts, I was told by a good moto mechanic that the reason for such low tork is so the fork is not deformed out of round or compressed in any way to allow the internal parts to be free to move in the manner designed. This is because the fork tube is very thin. Not necessarily to strip the threads. :cry:

  • SC_Spode

Posted December 18, 2004 - 02:42 PM

#8

If you guys are talking about the upper fork pinch bolts, I was told by a good moto mechanic that the reason for such low tork is so the fork is not deformed out of round or compressed in any way to allow the internal parts to be free to move in the manner designed. This is because the fork tube is very thin. Not necessarily to strip the threads. :cry:


I assumed when he was talking about Gold Valves and 30-48 in-lbs, he was referring to the nut that holds down the shims on the base valve assembly.
Race Tech called for 48 in-lbs on the last set I saw.

Most of the triple clamps I've seen call for about 14 ft-lbs on the lower and 16 on the upper. This is a lot more than 30-48 in-lbs! :cry:

:cry:

  • socal_250f_racer

Posted December 19, 2004 - 02:19 PM

#9

Yeah its the bolt that holds down the valves and gold valve. I torqued it by my own feelings and so far no problems. The ride is now much smoother than before with stock valving. Its kinda weird though because racetech's valves and shim stacks seem so much simplier than the stock ones. I can tell from riding hard today that I might have to go for the stiffer shock but all around the ride is much more plush and still with better bottoming resistance. Anybody second guessing these things should go for it, it does make the ride less harsh and smoother.

  • Farmr123

Posted December 20, 2004 - 10:43 AM

#10

For occasional use, you can get one quite cheaply from www.harborfreight.com maybe $20 or so. If all you use it for is your bike you should be OK, but for anything more than occasional use, I'd get the Craftsman.

  • Ride

Posted December 20, 2004 - 03:04 PM

#11

I have used the harborfright ones and they are fine and pretty accurate.

Be carfull, I snapped a base valve tower once, the night before a race. NOT fun. You get to replace the entire base valve. :cry:

  • sireland67

Posted December 20, 2004 - 03:44 PM

#12

Just remember that torque wrenches are most accurate in the middle of the range, like if it rated 0 to 250 ft lbs, then it will give the most accurate reading around 125 lbs and not at around 30 or 220 ft lbs.

  • drex

Posted December 20, 2004 - 08:44 PM

#13

No one seems to have one to rent or buy really.


Pep boys rents them . . . you pay the $40 purchase price, then return it for a full refund minus the local sales tax.





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