Utah OHV Laws and Children?


17 replies to this topic
  • vmaxcbr900wr426

Posted December 16, 2004 - 08:48 AM

#1

I was talking with my buddy and he took his son and another guy and his son out to Moab. The one boy was under 8 years old and they were given a hard time about his age.

How do you guys get around this?

http://www.atvutah.c...ws.htm#41-22-29

  • FamilyRider

Posted December 16, 2004 - 11:56 AM

#2

I don't get around it. I try to abide by the law. Just before my kids turned 8 I started teaching them to ride on private property. I signed them up to get safety certified shortely after their birthday. They are all now certified for motorcycle and ATV.

I know many of you want to start your kids out younger, but I have been quite content waiting for them to turn 8. Our family rides purely for recreation - we are not in to racing or anything.

When my youngest turned 8 I sold my dual-sport and bought my crf250X since I no longer had to have my son on the back. When my son was handed his certificate, he looked up at me and said; "dad, now I don't have to ride with you any more!" (and I only dumped it once while he was on the back :cry: )

  • Mtnarcher1

Posted December 16, 2004 - 12:01 PM

#3

This is one of those laws that we all have to live by because of idiots passing on the stupid gene. :cry: I was talking to the Gunnison County Sheriff in Taylor Park on trip. He was commenting on how many young kids were allowed to ride on the main access road without supervision. :cry: He also commented on how many times over the years he has had to go out there and do reports because of kids getting killed.
I myself have seen kids riding quads in excess of 500cc that could not even touch the footpegs. My oldest and his friend pulled a quad off of a little girl who rolled the thing.
I hate to see any law inflicted but this variety makes up for the stupid gene. Now if they will enforce it and back it up with stiff fines. :cry:

  • 125shifter

Posted December 16, 2004 - 01:09 PM

#4

When I purchased a bike for my eldest son, I had no idea there was such a law. I then heard a little about it and thought that it pertained to quads only. It wasn't until this past summer that I read what you posted.

I guess legally when we ride on public land, I'm/he's in violaiton of the law. So are the poligamists (although they don't live on public land), but I don't see them getting tickets. :cry:

I try to abide by the law in all cases, this however is silly. My son, on his KDX50 (which he has outgrown) is very safe, wears all requisite safety gear, etc. If a ranger wants to pork with me about it then fine, but that ain't stop'n me from ride'n w/ him.

  • Hokie

Posted December 16, 2004 - 01:20 PM

#5

If I lived in UT I would just not abide by that law. If I got a $50.00 ticket I would just pay it and keep letting my kid ride.

I feel laws like this are made for ignorant parents who need the govt to look out for their family, and therefore should not apply to me. I don't want the govt telling me what to do or how to raise my family, especially if they "think" it is for my own good.

  • vmaxcbr900wr426

Posted December 16, 2004 - 02:09 PM

#6

Tim, I basically agree with you and the main reason I posted the question was that I know there are people on this site like Shifter who have boys around my son's ages that ride.

I've taken my little guys out to the Pawnee National Grasslands and let them ride. That was last year when the oldest was 6 1/2 and the middle one had just turned 4. They rode around and had a great time and I did not ride but supervised. I will probably take them out there again this winter along with the local track and do the same thing since I'm not sure they are ready to ride with me yet.

I also think there are moronic parents out there who let their 5-6 year old kids ride 500cc quads with no helmet or protective gear. Darwinism at it's best.

I'm just curious as to how Utah is getting away with this? As an out of state visitor, do I have to have my kids take this class to ride Moab/San Rafael Swell, White Wash, etc once they turn 8?

  • 125shifter

Posted December 16, 2004 - 02:17 PM

#7

As an out of state visitor, do I have to have my kids take this class to ride Moab/San Rafael Swell, White Wash, etc once they turn 8?

I would think it's excessive to ask our visitors to comply w/ such a law for such a short period of time.

  • motoxpress

Posted December 16, 2004 - 03:09 PM

#8

I have 5 kids(10, 9, 7, 6, 4) and the oldest 3 have been riding for about two years. I made the mistake of buying both a dirt bike(xr50) and a 4 wheeler(Sundiro 90). I will never buy a kids quad again and here's why:

-The wheelbase is designed too narrowly and makes it easy to roll
-It gives a feeling of overconfidence and a lack of respect - looks and feels too easy.
-When you wreck it, it comes comes hunting for you....rolling. Bike tends to just fall over.
-You are forced to learn more skills on the dirt bike like balance and the use of real controls.(I have issues with PW50s to for this reason - I'm weird)

I found that my kids were better riders by having started on the XR. I made sure they all knew how to ride it and they of course would ride with helmets and thick boots. The most they ever got for injuries on the bike was scrapes. The quad rolled over on one of them and bucked another one off and her foot got caught under the rear tire - both could have been devastating.

My point in posting this is just that we need to make sure we put thought into our decisions regarding our kids and not just assume it's ok if the salesman says so. If we did that more we would not have silly laws like this.

mx

  • FamilyRider

Posted December 16, 2004 - 03:27 PM

#9

I agree that bikes are usually safer than quads - especially for kids. Quads can be ridden without any training or skill - and that leads to danger.

One of the main reasons I got back in to dirt biking was to teach my kids "situational awareness". On a bike you have to deal with balance, throttle, hand and foot brakes, clutching, steering, avoiding obsticals, avoiding other riders, etc. What better way to prepare my kids to drive a car on the street!

The key to safe driving is proper instruction. I have taken the time to teach my kids the basics before they started riding. I continue to educate them (and me) each time we go riding.

I have seen other fathers just put their kid on a bike and let them go. 100 yards down the road and we stop for a junction and that child locks up the front brake and crashes in the gravel. End of day for that family ride.

This age limit law is just like the area closure issues we deal with - a few idiots ruin it for the rest of us.

This particular law hasn't been a big deal for me because I didn't get back in to riding until most of my kids were teenagers. So, that means I have been able to abide by the law (for the most part), but it doesn't mean I agree with it.

  • vmaxcbr900wr426

Posted December 16, 2004 - 03:46 PM

#10

I agree 100% about atv's for kids and according to the site, it doesn't discriminate between bikes and atv's. My boys want one bad and I've just told them no way. They get bikes, if they don't want to ride them fine, I'll have another one for me. :cry:

The reason I purchased the bikes is that when they wreck, things stop. With atv's many times keep going and run back over the individual.

  • mknight

Posted December 17, 2004 - 07:38 AM

#11

I’ve got 4 kids ages 9, 6, 5, and 3. The first three are boys and all three of them ride, but they are as different as night and day in their skill and interest. My oldest son is very coordinated, almost as passionate and addicted to motorcycles as I am, and very skilled. Within 2 weeks of him turning 8 I had him in the Utah State OHV class (we had already registered and studied the booklet). He took both the motorcycle course and ATV course just so he was legal no matter he was riding.

There is no “way around it” as far as the law is concerned. I intend to have all of my kids take the course and be fully registered to comply with the law. But….I do let my other kids ride. I do a little bit of racing here and there, but 90% of our riding is on family camp trips primarily to the west deserts of Utah and Southern Utah. When we camp I intentionally try to find areas where we are as far away from anyone else as I can and that are conducive to allowing my kids to ride close to camp under my supervision. I usually lay out a little course, or boundaries, where my kids know they can ride. I am always right there with them. They all ride machines that are appropriate for their size and age and they all wear all of the proper protective gear. All of my machines are registered as well to avoid any hassle from any rangers. I’ve not had any problems so far but in a few years it shouldn’t be a concern for me anyway because my kids will all be of age and through the course. In the meantime, I take every other precaution within my control and enjoy the time with my family.

Regarding the ATV/motorcycle issue, I realize that wasn’t the original question posed in this thread so I don’t want to derail it any further but I do have a few thoughts. I have a definite bias towards motorcycles for all of the same reasons already mentioned by others. I sold my wife’s four-wheeler a few years ago and bought her a DRZ 125/L once she became more comfortable with riding. Out of 6 machines, I now only have one small four-wheeler for my 6 year old son. I debated about purchasing one, but it came down to personality and a desire to keep him involved. He is not as interested in riding as my two other boys, but loves to camp, hang out with the kids, and be part of the “scene”. At home, while his brothers are outside building jumps in the driveway for their bikes, he’s inside drawing or watching Jimmy Neutron. He’s just a different kid with different interests and I love him just the same. I know his personality and I know that if I tried to make him ride a motorcycle he would have resented it and hated it even more. Instead, riding a small ATV with simple controls and balance has given him the confidence and enjoyment of riding with his brothers and his little buddies when we camp. He has demonstrated good control and decision making skill relative to his age and abilities. There is no doubt my preference is that he was on a motorcycle and I hope to move him up to his brother’s TTR90 in a year or two, but for now it works for us and we have fun.

  • r1superstar

Posted December 17, 2004 - 08:31 AM

#12

If I lived in UT I would just not abide by that law. If I got a $50.00 ticket I would just pay it and keep letting my kid ride.

I feel laws like this are made for ignorant parents who need the govt to look out for their family, and therefore should not apply to me. I don't want the govt telling me what to do or how to raise my family, especially if they "think" it is for my own good.



MOST of the laws here in Utah are really ignorant. The law about no kids under 8 on a dirt bike is one of them. If my son were three, he would be on the dirt bike ASAP (that's if he wanted to ride). I would pay the $50.00 if we got caught (but I would probably be able to talk my way out of the infraction.)

ATVs are a whole different ball of wax. They are DANGEROUS PERIOD and most of the parents that let little kids operate ATVs that are too big for them are DANGEROUS too! I have seen more than my fair share of these idiots (pardon my verbage), but let's not worry about them, let "Natural Selection" take its course...

P.S. Paying an assesed value tax and an OHV fee for my dirt bikes is also an extremely senseless law.

  • motoxpress

Posted December 18, 2004 - 08:20 AM

#13

I’ve got 4 kids ages 9, 6, 5, and 3. The first three are boys and all three of them ride, but they are as different as night and day in their skill and interest. My oldest son is very coordinated, almost as passionate and addicted to motorcycles as I am, and very skilled. Within 2 weeks of him turning 8 I had him in the Utah State OHV class (we had already registered and studied the booklet). He took both the motorcycle course and ATV course just so he was legal no matter he was riding.

There is no “way around it” as far as the law is concerned. I intend to have all of my kids take the course and be fully registered to comply with the law. But….I do let my other kids ride. I do a little bit of racing here and there, but 90% of our riding is on family camp trips primarily to the west deserts of Utah and Southern Utah. When we camp I intentionally try to find areas where we are as far away from anyone else as I can and that are conducive to allowing my kids to ride close to camp under my supervision. I usually lay out a little course, or boundaries, where my kids know they can ride. I am always right there with them. They all ride machines that are appropriate for their size and age and they all wear all of the proper protective gear. All of my machines are registered as well to avoid any hassle from any rangers. I’ve not had any problems so far but in a few years it shouldn’t be a concern for me anyway because my kids will all be of age and through the course. In the meantime, I take every other precaution within my control and enjoy the time with my family.


I respect you for this. I have always tried to respect the laws and keep my riding "on the level". I makes for a more enjoyable experience for me and peace of mind knowing I have done everything I can to make it safe for my kids.


Regarding the ATV/motorcycle issue, I realize that wasn’t the original question posed in this thread so I don’t want to derail it any further but I do have a few thoughts. I have a definite bias towards motorcycles for all of the same reasons already mentioned by others. I sold my wife’s four-wheeler a few years ago and bought her a DRZ 125/L once she became more comfortable with riding. Out of 6 machines, I now only have one small four-wheeler for my 6 year old son. I debated about purchasing one, but it came down to personality and a desire to keep him involved. He is not as interested in riding as my two other boys, but loves to camp, hang out with the kids, and be part of the “scene”. At home, while his brothers are outside building jumps in the driveway for their bikes, he’s inside drawing or watching Jimmy Neutron. He’s just a different kid with different interests and I love him just the same. I know his personality and I know that if I tried to make him ride a motorcycle he would have resented it and hated it even more. Instead, riding a small ATV with simple controls and balance has given him the confidence and enjoyment of riding with his brothers and his little buddies when we camp. He has demonstrated good control and decision making skill relative to his age and abilities. There is no doubt my preference is that he was on a motorcycle and I hope to move him up to his brother’s TTR90 in a year or two, but for now it works for us and we have fun.


I hear what you are saying. In your case it probably makes sense for your 6 YO as he is a conservative rider and is content to stay that way. I found my kids always wanting to go a little faster or climb a little higher which is fine with me as long as they have control over the situation (my oldest daughter is a speed demon). A bike is more forgiving in these situations where you push it too far. I do emphasize wisdom to my kids though - maybe too much according to my brother who is Mr. Big Air :cry:

I just can't stand the thought of having to carry one of my kids into a hospital all broken up.... :cry:

mx

  • FamilyRider

Posted December 18, 2004 - 08:53 AM

#14

I just can't stand the thought of having to carry one of my kids into a hospital all broken up.... :cry:

mx


When I first considered getting back into the sport after being away since I was a teenager, I had a friend take me and my two oldest children out riding. They had bikes and ATVs, so we could see which we prefer. After a great day of riding with the kids on the back of an ATV, we found a nice play spot with a mud puddle, we decided to let the kids try driving. They had no experience and no training (stupid parents). My 12-year old daughter lost control and rode over a 100' embankment. I was standing 20' away with my camera in my hand - totally bewildered by what I just saw. Luckily, my daughter jumped off and clear of the ATV, as it rolled about 100' feet down the hill and slammed into a huge pine tree. If she didn't jump off, she probably would have been killed. She came away with a broken arm, just above the wrist. Our first trip to the hospital.

That may have been the end of our dirt biking experience, but shortly thereafter my younger daughter broke her arm playing on our swing set in the back yard. We did learn, however, that we need better safety gear and proper training.

My other two trips to the hospital were just freak accidents. My oldest son crashed while riding down the 2WD dirt road back to the car. He hit a rut caused by erosion, lost control and tried to put his foot down to stop from tipping over. Broke both bones right above the ankle. This was before we bought good riding boots. Pretty serious surgery involved. But he still loves to ride!

And this fall, my second son tipped over 50' from the car. He twisted his ankle trying to keep his DRZ-400 upright. Turned out to be a small fracture - just like the one my wife got in front of our house when she almost tipped over on her bicycle.

My oldest daughter (the one that broke her arm) is pretty good with first aid, so she has kept us out of the hospital for the minor cuts and bruises which we got before knee pads and riding pants.

There is no doubt that there is some risk associated with this sport, but with proper training and proper gear I feel that it is a managable risk. After all, the most dangerous thing we own is that stupid trampoline!

  • r1superstar

Posted December 18, 2004 - 10:38 AM

#15

When I first considered getting back into the sport after being away since I was a teenager, I had a friend take me and my two oldest children out riding. They had bikes and ATVs, so we could see which we prefer. After a great day of riding with the kids on the back of an ATV, we found a nice play spot with a mud puddle, we decided to let the kids try driving. They had no experience and no training (stupid parents). My 12-year old daughter lost control and rode over a 100' embankment. I was standing 20' away with my camera in my hand - totally bewildered by what I just saw. Luckily, my daughter jumped off and clear of the ATV, as it rolled about 100' feet down the hill and slammed into a huge pine tree. If she didn't jump off, she probably would have been killed. She came away with a broken arm, just above the wrist. Our first trip to the hospital.

That may have been the end of our dirt biking experience, but shortly thereafter my younger daughter broke her arm playing on our swing set in the back yard. We did learn, however, that we need better safety gear and proper training.

My other two trips to the hospital were just freak accidents. My oldest son crashed while riding down the 2WD dirt road back to the car. He hit a rut caused by erosion, lost control and tried to put his foot down to stop from tipping over. Broke both bones right above the ankle. This was before we bought good riding boots. Pretty serious surgery involved. But he still loves to ride!

And this fall, my second son tipped over 50' from the car. He twisted his ankle trying to keep his DRZ-400 upright. Turned out to be a small fracture - just like the one my wife got in front of our house when she almost tipped over on her bicycle.

My oldest daughter (the one that broke her arm) is pretty good with first aid, so she has kept us out of the hospital for the minor cuts and bruises which we got before knee pads and riding pants.

There is no doubt that there is some risk associated with this sport, but with proper training and proper gear I feel that it is a managable risk. After all, the most dangerous thing we own is that stupid trampoline!


It appears that you learned (I hope) a valuable lesson. "GET THE PROPER GEAR ON YOUR KIDS!!" And teach them how to ride...
:cry:

  • mrmoto

Posted December 20, 2004 - 02:10 PM

#16

Danny - If you're 3 year old is anything like mine (3 years ago), he's gonna love a '50. My son is now 6 and has been riding for 3 years. I have two girls that have been riding since they were 5.

Never had a problem with the rangers until this Saturday. I had one hassle me about his age. In the end, the ranger told me that was the law, winked and said he was leaving and wouldn't be back to check up on us. My fault for parking in the main lot. Next time, I'll unload way out back where the rangers won't find us. By the way, this was at 5 mile pass. What's a ranger doing out there anyway?

  • r1superstar

Posted December 20, 2004 - 05:45 PM

#17

Danny - If you're 3 year old is anything like mine (3 years ago), he's gonna love a '50. My son is now 6 and has been riding for 3 years. I have two girls that have been riding since they were 5.

Never had a problem with the rangers until this Saturday. I had one hassle me about his age. In the end, the ranger told me that was the law, winked and said he was leaving and wouldn't be back to check up on us. My fault for parking in the main lot. Next time, I'll unload way out back where the rangers won't find us. By the way, this was at 5 mile pass. What's a ranger doing out there anyway?



We'll see what happens. I already sold his CRF50 in August (he is too little to ride it; :cry:). As for the Ranger at 5 mile, they are around every now and then. It appears you met a cool one. I have met a couple nice ones as well. I was ripping up this hill in fourth and came flying back down, right in front of them, and all they said was "That guy can RIDE!" I was not treading lightly nor did I have my OHV sticker on my bike.

  • CY_in_CA

Posted December 20, 2004 - 09:35 PM

#18

As an out of state visitor, do I have to have my kids take this class to ride Moab/San Rafael Swell, White Wash, etc once they turn 8?


You'll want to check with the state website to make sure, but I don't think you'd have any problems being an out of stater. Prior to moving here in January, I took one of my kids to a state OHV / track in Salt Lake City. I had never even heard of this law, and since I was from out of state, they told me about the law, and then told us to have a good time. I'm pretty sure the law for out of state is the same as registration, in other words, the bike should be registered in the state your from. You don't need any thing for Utah.

Since moving here in January, we've never had any issues with the law or any certificate. I haven't enrolled my kids, but will probably do so over the next few months, when I get around to it. We rarely ever ride on ohv land, rather we ride in areas that are public, but not patrolled by anyone. Mostly though, we ride tracks. We've been to most of the tracks in Utah, and I don't think any of them are State run, so it's never been an issue for us.





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