First trip to the dunes (Glamis) on the BRP!


8 replies to this topic
  • snaggletooth

Posted December 14, 2004 - 01:46 AM

#1

WOW, WHAT A RIDE!!!!

Thanks to all for the good advice from past post's. I had no problem staying off of the front brake. It came natural while in the sand even after 22 years of countless road bike miles. I didn't notice any problems with the front end digging due to compression braking. I finally got the hang of how to place my feet in turns (too many road bike miles). That came naturally in the sand also, I hope I can transfer this new found skill to the dirt.

I was able to keep up with very experienced quad ridders doing every thing they could to shake me. No hill seemed to big with a good start at it. BTW, oldsmobile hill was kinda weak!

The biggest chalenge was the night rides following the quads. When I stayed focused I was able to follow 99% of their lines in the day time. Night time was a lot harder. I ate it two times at night. One on a looooong and steeeeep hill and the other time was when they rode on the tops of razor backs.

It was easier to following a great quad ridder at hyper speeds in the steep tight stuff than to following an OK ridder "trying" to go fast in the tough stuff. The OK guys would slow down to much while second guessing them selves and would not allways find the good line.

The only bad side was that I think that it was very hard on the motor. I did a lot of hours of hard ridding and the BRP seemed to start running bad near the end of the trip. It was getting hard to start and was heating up faster than normal! I did not boil over due to the proper jetting and the Evans coolant but I had some very hard starts and seemed to noticed a little power loss. I hope I didn't put a hurting on my baby.

It was intence "all or nothing" ridding and I loved it! I still like tecnical dirt ridding better because My BRP doesn't heat-up as fast and I can slow down now and then to catch my breath without comming to a complete stop.

There was some trading out between quad's while we were in the thick of the dunes. I offered the quad ridders a chance to see what it was like in the dunes on the BRP. Would you be suprized to here that none of them wanted a chance to take dune ridding to another level, hahahahaha!

Quad's are fun and I would love to play in the dunes on one once in a while but it's no challenge compaired to a bike, boooooorrrrrring!

After I take the BRP in for a check up and after (if?) it shows no signs of abuse I will look forward to going again. I will also look into getting a "ten cup" paddle, it can only make it better?

PS, the mysterious "Glamis sand" didn't spell-binde me but I did take some home for futher observation, hahahahahaha

ST.

  • JackAttack

Posted December 14, 2004 - 07:31 AM

#2

PS, the mysterious "Glamis sand" didn't spell-binde me but I did take some home for futher observation, hahahahahaha



I was also At Glamis this past weekend. I can tell you that the sand was unlike any other time I had been there. I have been there over 30 times. The wet weather over the last few weeks had the sand very moist and hardpacked.

Traction was at an all time high and there was no dust. The roost from the bikes was in clumps. I'm so glad I went down to experience it, I don't think it will ever be like that again.

I would not expect your next dune trip to be as easy to ride in. Especially the large bowls.

:cry:

  • BWB63

Posted December 14, 2004 - 08:56 AM

#3

"The only bad side was that I think that it was very hard on the motor. I did a lot of hours of hard ridding and the BRP seemed to start running bad near the end of the trip. It was getting hard to start and was heating up faster than normal! I did not boil over due to the proper jetting and the Evans coolant but I had some very hard starts and seemed to noticed a little power loss. I hope I didn't put a hurting on my baby. "

Did you have a paddle?

  • qadsan

Posted December 14, 2004 - 09:26 AM

#4

I've only ridden my bike without a paddle and it does just fine at Glamis or Dumont as long as I keep my speed up. What kills me is when I loose speed on a hill or in a large bowl and the rear digs in quickly, especially on the steep stuff. Depending on where I'm riding, that can happen quite often where people either cut my line or slow or stop in front of me, etc. The last time I was at Dumont, comp hill looked like it was being swarmed and there were people on all sides of me in all kinds of bikes/quads/buggies while climbing it. The sand really robs the power, but the paddle will make things much easier even though the stock tire can get you most anywhere if you keep your speed up.

I've talked with several xr650r owners who have found sand in the clean side of their airbox, some of which have experienced a loss of power and or burning oil afterwards. Make sure you check that lower front clasp on the left side panel because it sometimes comes off or doesn't clamp down tight enough to provide a good seal. I normally use a side panel that's cut open for better performance, but I switch to a stock closed side panel when riding in the sand just incase the bike goes down on its left side. My bike usually keeps running on its side (Edelbrock & z-Start) and I'm just concerned there's more of a chance for sand to get sucked into the engine through the screen & foam filter with the side panel opened up if it were burried in the sand.

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  • hill5150

Posted December 14, 2004 - 10:38 AM

#5

:cry: Glamis was sick last Sunday, i went back for the day i was there the weekend prior as well. Total traction and no crowds 5th pinned all day long :cry:

  • Cruise283

Posted December 14, 2004 - 02:26 PM

#6

Just reading this, reminds me of a time when i went four-wheel driving on Stockton beach, one of the few places near me ( 4.5 hrs away) that you can legally drive/ride on sand.

Anyway, we took a mate who hadn't been before, telling him - ' sand driving is pretty hard (newby) your car can go all over the place, absolutely must lower air pressure to abouit 12 psi, you could get bogged to axles etc...'

BUT,

it had rained recently - might as well have been driving on concrete...

So he thought it was easy as - where as when we've been it's been close to 40 deg C , and sand loose as.

Rain makes a huge difference - the dunes had about an inch or dry sand, then wet sand underneath.

Can't wait to ride there though.....

Just my 2 cents....

  • XR/CRDave

Posted December 14, 2004 - 03:00 PM

#7

The dunes are so fun on the BRP, other than jumping or racing up Olds I enjoy the BRP better than my 01 CR250 and I do not run a paddle. I got tired of the sand clogging the filter due to the paddle. When I run no paddle the filter lasts for a 3 or 4 day weekend and w/ the paddle the filter is so clogged by the end of a 2 day weekend. Its cool cuz my friends say that they have never seen a tire spin that fast bedfore, I just keep upshifting it just keeps pulling, yet I am keeping up with their 450's w/o any problems. When it is really soft I run the front tire at 8 psi, this helps a lot and it corners awesome. I want to go this weekend but probably won't make it til new years.

  • snaggletooth

Posted December 15, 2004 - 09:01 PM

#8

JackAtack & Cruise283 Ouch! You killed my confidence, hahahaha. ya, your right. Every one told me how the sand was extreamly wet. I'm sure that it made it much easy'er. I rode on some dryer stuff and it was a lot harder, thats where I ate it. I hope that now armed with a litte sand experience my next trip (in dry sand) will be as good as the last.

BWB63, I used an 8 paddle tire. It powered the bike well. What can I expect with a 10 paddle tire?

Gota get that Edlebrock!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • qadsan

Posted December 15, 2004 - 09:31 PM

#9

Some people I've talked with like the 8 and some like the 10. I don't use a paddle on my 650r (I've used them on other bikes), but most people I've talked with prefer the 8 on the 650r. The trick is to find a paddle that offers a good balance between the wheel RPM and traction. More cups (up to a point) will give you better traction, but if the front wheel is always coming up instead of moving you forward, then perhaps a smaller paddle may suite you better. Too few of cups causes the rear wheel to spin faster and you'll end up throwing a sand roost and you may not get up to speed as quick as you want. Bigger isn't always better, but 8's and 10's are one 's to look at as opposed to anything smaller or larger.





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