Welding on frame?


11 replies to this topic
  • jimn

Posted December 04, 2004 - 05:15 AM

#1

I just ordered a WER steering stabilizer for my 02 yz426,one of the mounting brackets welds to frame @ steering head.What electrics,electronics do I need to disconnect ,if any ,prior to mig welding? Has anybody used this stabilizer?,and if so any tips comments,etc.,would be appreciated.Thanks,Jim

  • BC3

Posted December 04, 2004 - 09:27 AM

#2

I have welded (TIG) on the new Yamahas (WR-450) and took that into consideration, after thinking about it for awhile I decided that if the ground
clamp was close to the weld spot no damage should occur.....and it didn't...
I would check with the Manuf. to make double sure although I feel pretty good
about my approach...

weld

BC :cry:

  • MXof21

Posted December 04, 2004 - 10:30 AM

#3

I don't think the location of the grounding clamp has anything to do with whether the electrical system is damaged. I assure you they entire frame is conducting electricity during welding. Why not take 60 seconds and unplug the CDI before welding?

  • BC3

Posted December 04, 2004 - 01:11 PM

#4

Yeah that is probably good advise if you have doubts....its been my experiance that if the CDI or any other elec. devise shares the ground of the welding
process then it will get hurt......thats why I didn't worry too much about
the case repair......but unplug if your uncertain......

BC :cry:

  • FFRacing79

Posted December 04, 2004 - 01:56 PM

#5

I don't think the location of the grounding clamp has anything to do with whether the electrical system is damaged. I assure you they entire frame is conducting electricity during welding. Why not take 60 seconds and unplug the CDI before welding?


I am sorry but it does. Electricity will follow the path of least resistance. So if you were to put the ground say a few inches from your weld point, the circuit will complete from the ground point to the weld point. Now if you were welding the steering head and clamped the ground to the subframe, your statement might be correct.
Try this...take a 12" piece of stock and clamp the ground in the middle. Now grab onto one end and contact the weld point to the other...NO shock
Now clamp the ground to one end and make the weld point the other end and grab in the middle. Hurts, don't it :cry:

  • jimn

Posted December 04, 2004 - 02:35 PM

#6

Thanks for the replies!,I was planning on using a magnetic grounding clamp to get as close as possible to weld (it's a small bracket and shouldn't require much).I will definately unplug CDI :cry: What about coil? I think it uses frame for ground,maybe I'll just unbolt it to be safe.Jim

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  • BC3

Posted December 04, 2004 - 02:55 PM

#7

I am sorry but it does. Electricity will follow the path of least resistance. So if you were to put the ground say a few inches from your weld point, the circuit will complete from the ground point to the weld point. Now if you were welding the steering head and clamped the ground to the subframe, your statement might be correct.
Try this...take a 12" piece of stock and clamp the ground in the middle. Now grab onto one end and contact the weld point to the other...NO shock
Now clamp the ground to one end and make the weld point the other end and grab in the middle. Hurts, don't it :cry:


Just listen to the OLD guys that have already been there done that .......
We won't steer you wrong...Hows things going Tryce? Give us a Phone call

Lynda says Hi

  • FFRacing79

Posted December 04, 2004 - 03:11 PM

#8

Just listen to the OLD guys that have already been there done that .......
We won't steer you wrong...Hows things going Tryce? Give us a Phone call

Lynda says Hi


Hey hey!!

  • MaxAZ

Posted December 06, 2004 - 05:57 PM

#9

So far I've welded a bracket for a Scott's low mount steering damper, a kickstand mounting tab and a coolant overflow tank mounting tab to my bike. I've never disconnected anything and never had any problems with damaging anything. With my personal history, if something can go wrong, it usually will. So if I can get away with this, anybody else probably could too. :cry:

  • WheelsUp

Posted March 12, 2005 - 11:50 PM

#10

Would I be correct in assuming that our frames are 4130?
I'm curious if the WER tab could be welded on using a plain old 6013 electrode with an AC-only stick welder, or if mig/tig is the only way to go.

  • trailriderjoe

Posted March 13, 2005 - 02:13 AM

#11

By the way, as stated before...GROUND LOCATION IS IMPORTANT. At work one day the guys were welding a prototype convertible roof (lots of pivots) and were oblivious to the clamp location. OOPS, next thing I knew they had a great weld, and had thrashed 6 sets of plastic bushings and rivets. The "path of least resistance" chased it's way up the mechanism thru all those nice riveted joints and bushings. And of course, as it jumped it arced from each rivet past the bushings, every bushing, BAR NONE, melted.


Hey BC3,
Did you lay the bike over on its side to do that weld. Either way I'm impressed. I'm still a rookie with TIG, I was brought up on the "farm" and all we had was gas and arc, so aluminum was pretty much out of the question!

NICE WORK!
I still am in shock when I watch by buddy Kris at work do aluminum, it's so tempermental, everything's got to be just right, and then it looks like your soldering. NOTHING like welding your basic steels.

  • grayracer513

Posted March 13, 2005 - 08:43 AM

#12

I am sorry but it does. Electricity will follow the path of least resistance. So if you were to put the ground say a few inches from your weld point, the circuit will complete from the ground point to the weld point. Now if you were welding the steering head and clamped the ground to the subframe, your statement might be correct.
Try this...take a 12" piece of stock and clamp the ground in the middle. Now grab onto one end and contact the weld point to the other...NO shock
Now clamp the ground to one end and make the weld point the other end and grab in the middle. Hurts, don't it :)

This, of course, is absolutely correct. There is, however, one other consideration to look at, particularly with very low voltage electronic circuits, and that is induction. A powerful electric current like a welder produces a very strong magnetic field which will align with the current path. As this field collapses (which happens 60 times per second with AC welding), it can induce electrical current in any nearby circuitry, and in some cases, may overload some electronic devices and damage them. While it's true that you can control the path the current takes when welding, it's still a good idea to disconnect any sensitive electronics if the harness runs close to the weld and relocate it if it is within 6" of the current path itself.





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