Headstock bearing help


5 replies to this topic
  • Baa

Posted November 17, 2004 - 12:35 PM

#1

Hi i wonder if anyone can help me. I need to change the bottom headstock bearing, ive managed to take it all apart but i cant get the bearing off the headstock shaft, is there any trick to get it off. Also does anyone know the bearing number so i can order a new while getting the old one sorted

Cheers

Yamaha Wr400 "99"

  • flyinguitars

Posted November 17, 2004 - 01:00 PM

#2

I just did mine....According to the manual I used a chisel and hammer...it worked. I put my lower clamp into the vise with a towel in the jaws to protect the clamp. Then I hammered the chisel into the space between the bearing and where it seats on the clamp....chisel flat side down...took a few minutes and that was it.

To seat the new bearing, I put the bearing on, slid it down as far as it would go, and then took it over to the bike.....i but the clamp and bearing back up into the stem until the new bearing hit the old race. Then I tapped the bottom of the clamp UP until the new bearing seated on the clamp.

Then I knocked out the out race with a hammer and a big A$$ snap on screwdriver....3 shots and it was outta there!

Also, save that old bearing race. When you go to install the new lower race, tap the new one in carefully until its pressed in and flush with the stem. I held a flat piece of metal over the race and tapped on the metal (to protect the race)...then take your old race, flip it over so it matches the new race (opposite) and line it up...then hammer the old race....this will seat the new race with no damage.....If you already knew this stuff...nevermind..lol

Mike

  • Treebark

Posted November 17, 2004 - 09:23 PM

#3

If you can't beat it off use a die grinder and cut it off carefully. To get the new one on, put the stem in the freezer and put the bearing in hot water, it will slide right on with no pressure but make sure to install dust seal first. Where to get the parts go to either of these two places: Zanotti Motors Home Page ,or DGY Motorsports | Order Yamaha OEM Parts On-Line .

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  • bikepilot

Posted November 18, 2004 - 12:37 AM

#4

Actually, tapping on the bottom of the clamp really isn't the best way to seat the new bearing. It probably won't hurt it that much depending on how hard you "tap", but you still run some risk of "brinelling" (or work hardening) the surface of the bearing in spots. Under hard riding conditions, even vigorous bumps (until you bottom completely out) don't transfer actual impact to the bearing. Think of how much more it hurts when you hold your high-powered rifle loosely and the recoil results in a hammering effect on your shoulder, rather than the controllable push that results from a proper hold. :cry:

I have a length of pipe that I use that only contacts the inner race while I tap them on, so that the rollers don't see any of the impact... :cry:

  • Baa

Posted November 18, 2004 - 11:37 AM

#5

Many thanks lads for all the replys :cry:

  • flyinguitars

Posted November 18, 2004 - 12:13 PM

#6

Actually, tapping on the bottom of the clamp really isn't the best way to seat the new bearing. It probably won't hurt it that much depending on how hard you "tap", but you still run some risk of "brinelling" (or work hardening) the surface of the bearing in spots. Under hard riding conditions, even vigorous bumps (until you bottom completely out) don't transfer actual impact to the bearing. Think of how much more it hurts when you hold your high-powered rifle loosely and the recoil results in a hammering effect on your shoulder, rather than the controllable push that results from a proper hold. :cry:

I have a length of pipe that I use that only contacts the inner race while I tap them on, so that the rollers don't see any of the impact... :cry:


yea, tap lightly...the load will be shared be the inner and outer race. I dont have the space in my freezer for bottom clamps...lol...also I'd be more inclined to heat the bearing in an oven before I submersed them in water to prvent any premature corrosion from water.




 
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