Best Way to Clean and O-ring Chain?


6 replies to this topic
  • audiodude

Posted September 18, 2004 - 04:54 PM

#1

I'm running an o-ring chain and my usual routine is to drench it with simple green prior to washing and scrub it with a soft brush. Then I start the bike and put it on a center stand to let the wheel spin and get rid of most of the water. Then I WD-40 the holy heck out of it to remove any remaining water and provide some lube. This has worked pretty well for me, but I'm startin to notice some build up of grime. With a regular chain, I would periodically remove it and clean it with gas or solvent, but I've been told this is a no-no for an o-ring chain as stong solvent will damage the o-rings. Any of ya'll got some suggestions? How do you guys clean your o-ring chains?

Thanks in advance.

  • mnovarossi

Posted September 18, 2004 - 05:21 PM

#2

Normally I just hose it off, but if its really grimy I'll use a soft nylon brush to scrub it. I have been told that Wd-40 can eat the o-rings on these chains but I have been using it on mine and I usually get 2 seasons from my chains.

  • ripntear

Posted September 18, 2004 - 05:24 PM

#3

I have always used kerosene. Let it soak for a while and scrub with a medium bristle brush. Lay it out and let it dry. Put it back on the bike and lube both sides where the O-Rings are. I see alot of people squirt their lube down the middle which goes right through the links and on to the sprocket. If they are lucky, some will find its way to the O-Rings. This is not the best way. You need to get the lube on and around the O-Rings which is where your chain will see the most wear.

ripntear

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  • WR426madness

Posted September 18, 2004 - 07:07 PM

#4

1500 psi preasure washer does a really good job. :cry:

  • grayracer513

Posted September 18, 2004 - 08:29 PM

#5

part of your problem might be what you lube it with. I use Maxima's synthetic Chain Guard. I just spray down the chain with Simple Green along with the rest of the bike and rinse it off with a hose and sprayer. I never use more water pressure than necessary on anything that has seals or gaskets to avoid water intrusion. Most stuff on the outside of the chain washes right off. After a few months, there is a little buildup of gummy stuff around the edges, so I wipe it off with a rag wet with mineral spirits (shop solvent), and then lube it with the synthetic right away. Works for me. I'd be surprised if I got any better life out of a chain than I already do.

  • ca412686

Posted September 20, 2004 - 06:29 AM

#6

I'm running an o-ring chain and my usual routine is to drench it with simple green prior to washing and scrub it with a soft brush. Then I start the bike and put it on a center stand to let the wheel spin and get rid of most of the water. Then I WD-40 the holy heck out of it to remove any remaining water and provide some lube. This has worked pretty well for me, but I'm startin to notice some build up of grime. With a regular chain, I would periodically remove it and clean it with gas or solvent, but I've been told this is a no-no for an o-ring chain as stong solvent will damage the o-rings. Any of ya'll got some suggestions? How do you guys clean your o-ring chains?

Thanks in advance.

You're doing it the right way. WD-40 doesnt eat he o-rings, its gas and different solvents that do, especially kerosene. I've used WD-40 for lube on my street bikes and dirtbikes for years, if i ran out of regular lube. It doesnt last very long cause it wont stick, but it'll get you out of a jam. Alot Superbike racers use WD-40 for the race, but the only run one race on a chain. Anyways, just keep doing what you're doing and it'll work. Try using Chain Wax. Its an awesome brand of chain lube. and if applied corectly it will last for a while.

  • ripntear

Posted September 20, 2004 - 01:34 PM

#7

I have never had any problems using kerosene. One reason I like it is that I can get the chain to dry quicker than using detergent and water. Some people hose their chains down with high pressure (I have done it several times) then lube the chain without it fully drying. The lube you use can actually trap the water in and accelerate the corrosion process. A kerosene bath (put it in a tub for a couple of minutes and scrub with a medium bristle brush till clean) may not be the absolute best for the o-rings , but it will cut all the build up faster than simple green and water, it dries faster which in turn allows you to lube it quicker. I lay my chain out and scrunch it up into a ball, then take a hair dryer and speed up the drying process. Flip it over and dry the other side. The metal links gathered together helps migrate the heat better. Im not talking about cooking the chain, just helping it dry sooner. Since I am a weekend warrior, I average 3-4 full cleanings a year. I have ridden years on a chain by keeping it maintained this way.
It works for me!

ripntear





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