Tire Change-Can I do it?


26 replies to this topic
  • r_dawg1021

Posted July 26, 2004 - 09:48 AM

#1

What's the experience level\knowledge required to mount up some new tires on my bike. Assuming I can get the wheels off I'm thinking I could save a few $$ if I put the new rubber on myself. I'm not asking "How" to do it I'm asking those who have done it if it's something most shade tree mechanics can do.

Do I need tons of 'special' tools or is it just like changing a flat bike tire when I was 10? Thanks for any feedback :thumbsup:

  • Indy_WR450

Posted July 26, 2004 - 10:37 AM

#2

It is a royal pain but I recommend a tire stand, 3 long 16" tire irons and 2 spoons, valve tool, and a bead buddy. Soap and water mix in a spray bottle. Be prepared for a 30 minute battle. I have no idea how the ISDE guys do it in 2 minutes? :thumbsup:

  • gloft

Posted July 26, 2004 - 11:17 AM

#3

Just swapped a rear tire and don't think I'll ever do another one. Maybe there's a trick but I had a heck of a time with the second rim lock. Good luck but I think it's definetly worth the $20.00 to have the local shop do it :thumbsup:

  • r_dawg1021

Posted July 26, 2004 - 11:29 AM

#4

Just swapped a rear tire and don't think I'll ever do another one. Maybe there's a trick but I had a heck of a time with the second rim lock. Good luck but I think it's definetly worth the $20.00 to have the local shop do it :thumbsup:


Good advice, I think I'm gonna leave it to the experts. Guess this is something I can't save any $$ on. Damn.

  • jchantzWR400F

Posted July 26, 2004 - 11:45 AM

#5

My experience is, if is DOT approved, forget about it. If not, you might have a shot (on the rear that is). Front should be no problem.

  • r_dawg1021

Posted July 26, 2004 - 11:46 AM

#6

My experience is, if is DOT approved, forget about it. If not, you might have a shot (on the rear that is). Front should be no problem.


This is due to DOT rubber being a lot harder right? Seems obvious but thought I would ask.

  • ddialogue

Posted July 26, 2004 - 12:36 PM

#7

YES YOU CAN DO IT!! :thumbsup:

DOT's have stiffer sidewalls. Yes, they can be tough to change but once you do a few you figure out what works and what doesn't. There was a great article on transworldmx.com that shows a fast way to change them.

Check it out: Six minute tire change

  • banffboy

Posted July 26, 2004 - 01:37 PM

#8

Don't be scared. Just take your time. I prefer the 20 bucks(35cdn)in my own pocket. I gets easier with each time. You can do it :thumbsup:

  • YamahaSteve

Posted July 26, 2004 - 03:51 PM

#9

I have changed two tires myself in my garage so far. Both times I installed a maxxis IT tire (which I guess is one of the hearest to change tires out there). It takes some elbow grease and a bit of determination but it can be done. My first shot was a little over an hour and the secod time I did it in just over 30 minutes. The second time I used a bit of soap and water and made a big difference. So in a word, YES!! A friend of mine asked me this... "What do you have to lose?" Meaning if you try and fail, you can still go the shop, right.

  • Dual_Dog

Posted July 26, 2004 - 05:52 PM

#10

Just swapped a rear tire and don't think I'll ever do another one. Maybe there's a trick but I had a heck of a time with the second rim lock. Good luck but I think it's definetly worth the $20.00 to have the local shop do it :thumbsup:


Good advice, I think I'm gonna leave it to the experts. Guess this is something I can't save any $$ on. Damn.


The only thing about NOT doing it is that you might HAVE to sometime out on the trail.

You need tools and that costs $$$. But once you have them, you can take the smaller ones with you for use off-road if need be. You'll also need a patch kit, axle wrench, CO2 or pump, and it's a good idea to carry a lightweight spare front tube. A front can be used for the rear in an absolute emergency.

I've done one front tire, an MT-18, and it wasn't very easy, even in my garage. Since I ride in some really remote areas in Mex and in the Dez, I need to know I can do it when there isn't any other alternative.

After all is said & done though, I won't do it if I don't have to...

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  • Gordingull

Posted July 26, 2004 - 11:25 PM

#11

I'm only 17 years old and I changed DOT approved rear tire yesterday (hope I'm spelling this right :devil:), It was a little stiff but all it needs is patience and two tire irons :thumbsup: I've always done it my self and will continue to do so. Atleast do it once just so you know how to if you need to on the trail :awww:

  • OzMatt

Posted July 27, 2004 - 12:11 AM

#12

Give it a go! You never know when you will need to do a roadside tube change, and rather than relying on someone else to do it for you, you can have it done and be back in saddle in no time at all.
I regularly swap from worn road tyres to fresh knobbies and back again (cant afford extra set of rims yet).
It gets easier every time.
A good trick is to warm up the tire first
Go for a quick blast on the old one first and put the new one in the sun for an hour or so.
Makes it alot more plyable.

  • WR_Dave

Posted July 27, 2004 - 02:21 AM

#13

I'd never pay someone $20.00 to do a job I can do myself in twenty minutes. Just buy the correct tire irons(spoons) from your local shop and with a little patience ,baby powder and window cleaner it is not that hard. I grew up on the farm and couldn't wait to have it done in :excuseme:town on the weekend so I have always done it myself. WR Dave.

  • MOmilkman

Posted July 27, 2004 - 03:48 AM

#14

If anyone is intrested, heres some more help on my crappy website
http://www.geocities...nging_tires.htm

  • jchantzWR400F

Posted July 27, 2004 - 04:53 AM

#15

My experience is, if is DOT approved, forget about it. If not, you might have a shot (on the rear that is). Front should be no problem.


This is due to DOT rubber being a lot harder right? Seems obvious but thought I would ask.


Yeah, that's pretty much it. I've changed knobbie tires front and rear. Usually about a 1/2 hour job per tire. When I tried to put a Kenda 761 (dual purpose DOT tire) I couldn't for the life of me get it to fit. In fact, I took it to the shop and it took the guy there over a half hour to put it on (rim locks were being a [@#$%&*!]).

  • KentuckyWR

Posted July 27, 2004 - 06:23 AM

#16

I've been changing my own tires since I was 14!!!
I can swap front and rear tires on my WR450 in less than 30 minutes.
I do it after and before every race.
I may not be as quick as an ISDE rider, but I've never paid a dealer to do it and it is very rare that I pinch a tube . . . I mean very rare!
Done it on the trail many times for friends as needed!

I'm currently coaching my 13 year old son on the process!

Not a big deal at all!

Have someone that is skilled show you how and you'll never pay a dealer to do it again.

I have an old wooden wire spool that is about 20 in across and a couple feet tall. I use that, a tire tool my dad made about 25 years ago, a big flat screwdriver, and a little WD40 to help the bead set when inflating!

Persistance coupled with a bit of an attack mode and you can knock it out in no time!!

Any true off road rider should be able to perform this task!!

Ride on! :thumbsup:

  • R_Little

Posted July 27, 2004 - 07:40 AM

#17

If the tire seems too stiff, leave it out in the sun or heat it with a hairdryer.

The most important thing to remember is that the tire MUST be in the drop center of the rim opposite the side you are working on. If your tire iron is pending or the bead is ripping the tire in not in the drop center. Reach over and push it in.

If you trail ride you MUST be able to do this.
With practice, tire changes that used to take hours can be done in 15 minutes.

I pitted for an ISDE guy last year who changed his tire in a couple of minutes. It all comes from practice.

  • ddialogue

Posted July 27, 2004 - 07:41 AM

#18

Any true off road rider should be able to perform this task!!


Well said!

  • kywr450r

Posted July 27, 2004 - 09:59 AM

#19

I have to agree with Indy on this one!!!!

I also grew up on a farm and can change bike tires myself. However, out of the 500 other things I could be doing on a weekend (riding with my son, having a beer, tweaking on our family's motorcycles, etc.) changing tires on a WR isn't worth $20 bucks... it is about as pleasurable as having sex with a rabid porcupine!! :devil:

I do agree that it is a good idea to have the basic mechanical skills and tools so you can do it while on the trail (had my nine year old son change his tire), but he too agrees...he'd rather mow a 1/2 acre yard with a push mower than change another tire. :thumbsup:

  • JVP

Posted July 27, 2004 - 12:08 PM

#20

I can change any tire in less than 15 minutes. :thumbsup: I have a good set of large spoons, a valve remover, a 12mm wrench, a 5 gallon bucket, some baby powder, and can of WD-40. It takes a little practice at first, but once you get a system down it is no big deal. :devil: There have been many good suggestions on how to do it on this and other threads. Putting the tire in the sun before you start is one of the best. Saving $20 per tire change can add up. Also, I do end up changing tires for friends, but the beer they supply is well worth the effort. I think it is a good thing to known, because there is no bike shop the middle of nowhere during a weekend trip. :awww:




 
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