Tightening headset to mimic effect of steering damping


21 replies to this topic
  • Bark3rd

Posted July 05, 2004 - 03:14 PM

#1

I read in a recent MX mag about some pro who tightens the crap out of his headset instead of running a steering dampner. Would this actually work for the average Joe? Would it cause premature wear? Exactly how would you go about it? I ride in nothing but grapefruit sized rocks, would like more stability.

  • Nate_R

Posted July 05, 2004 - 03:43 PM

#2

I don't think it would be a good idea. I'm no engineer but i'm pretty sure you'll get premature wear. Tightening it too much is kinda like when you sand something with sand paper. The more pressure you put while sanding, the more material you sand off. Just my 2 shilings.

  • Indy_WR450

Posted July 05, 2004 - 07:52 PM

#3

Ditto. A very bad idea! :thumbsup:

  • Hamish

Posted July 05, 2004 - 08:54 PM

#4

:( :thumbsup: :devil: :awww: :lol: :D :lol: :lol: :lol: :D :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :snore: :lol:
Pro's can afford to fit new stem bearing every few races if required. Can you? In my opinion it's also a dangerous thing to do. Overloading the bearing could cause it to lock up. I'd rather have a bit of tankslap than bars that wont turn. Anyway, headshake is fun, gets the adrenalin pumping :D

  • The_Missile

Posted July 05, 2004 - 10:13 PM

#5

sounds dangerous. dont do it.

  • PumpkinHumper

Posted July 06, 2004 - 02:51 AM

#6

I have heard of Pro's doing this also. I think MC used to do that.

But yea unless you can afford to replace steering bearings and races every few weeks I wouldn't recomend it.

  • Rich_in_Orlando

Posted July 06, 2004 - 05:17 AM

#7

Seems to me that a pro would be able to afford a steering damper. :thumbsup:

  • Bark3rd

Posted July 06, 2004 - 08:06 AM

#8

Maybe if I know Im going to do a rocky loop I could tighten her up then loosen later!

  • Nate_R

Posted July 06, 2004 - 09:06 AM

#9

Maybe a pro would do it cause it would be lighter than adding a steering damper......?

  • Rich_in_Orlando

Posted July 06, 2004 - 09:42 AM

#10

Yeah, those 8 ounces would be the difference between winning and losing.

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  • blue_beast_wins

Posted July 06, 2004 - 10:34 AM

#11

I'll give it a go and come back with the results, riding rocks this weekend, cant see it doing any damage considering those bearings cant possibly generate much heat.

  • Hamish

Posted July 06, 2004 - 11:24 PM

#12

I'll give it a go and come back with the results,



No offence intended, but why ask the question in the first place if you go against all the good advise you recieve?

  • R_Little

Posted July 07, 2004 - 05:43 AM

#13

Many years ago, bikes came with knobs on the steering stem to keep the bike from tank slapping at speed.

I don't think tight a steering stem will harm the bearngs at all. It's loose bearings that get divots in the races.
Tight bearings will just make the bike unable to correct at speed and the bike will weave. Try it, tighten the bearings and then ride on the road at 40mph or so. The bike will start to weave because it can't overcome the bearing friction to correct for the small left to right leaning of the bike as you ride.

I think it have to be very tight to mimic a steering damper though. A real steering damper should only cut in on hard hits, and cause no friction when the going is smooth.

That being said. I run my steering beairngs a little tight for a little more stability in the woods and I can feel it's a little too tight on the road. I don't know if it helps for sure as the bars still get blasted out of my hands on offset rock hits!!

  • Oasis_Flame

Posted July 07, 2004 - 10:06 AM

#14

Thats been a trick of mine for years. I do inspect the bearings first and use a good marine grease, because it sheds water very well, I then pre-load the bearings to a light snug. I do feel a differance when hitting rocks or wash outs in the desert. IMO the bars seem alittle more stable at high speed and no harm yet to the stem or bearings on this bike nor the last five I've owned. I've done the same for friends and they seemed to like the differance.

  • blue_beast_wins

Posted July 07, 2004 - 09:52 PM

#15

I'll give it a go and come back with the results,



No offence intended, but why ask the question in the first place if you go against all the good advise you recieve?


Hamish,

I think you may be a little confused as to who asked questions and who replied :devil:,

I dont ask questions i just try stuff and see if it makes me crash more :thumbsup:

  • Hamish

Posted July 07, 2004 - 10:24 PM

#16

I think you may be a little confused as to who asked questions and who replied ,



Oops... :thumbsup: sorry 'bout that Steve. Maybe next time I'll look to the top of the forum before I open my big mouth.

  • J_DOGG

Posted July 08, 2004 - 06:41 AM

#17

What steering dampener would you guys recommend for a guy that still rides his WR 50% street and 50% trail??

  • beezer

Posted July 08, 2004 - 07:05 AM

#18

I know people who have been doing it for years. The bearings are carrying very little load. They are about the size of pickup truck wheel bearings. Most bearings go bad from lack of grease or corrosion.

We used to do this on early 90's CR250 Hondas that had lots of headshake. I have never heard of any problems but I doubt it works as well as a steering dampner.

  • Indy_WR450

Posted July 08, 2004 - 12:07 PM

#19

Scotts! I use them om my WR450 and My R1! :thumbsup:

  • RichBaker

Posted July 08, 2004 - 02:26 PM

#20

What steering dampener would you guys recommend for a guy that still rides his WR 50% street and 50% trail??


Scotts....the 1st and still the best! :thumbsup: I've run one for 5 years now and love it....




 
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