tying bikes down



37 replies to this topic
  • John_Lorenz

Posted May 22, 2002 - 05:23 PM

#21

Shawn Me and You Bud !

Ok so what about the tire, ya squish it real flat using a 2x4. and talk about the possible splinters and flats you will get if a nail is in the 2x4.

I have no issues if you want to waist ten bucks to I hear 60 bucks on a useless peiec of garbage.

Shawn points out real clear, Sinch it tight while driving, Loosen up while parked.
Sinch = Drive
Loose = park
Sinch = Drive
Loose = Park

  • CAL

Posted May 23, 2002 - 02:41 AM

#22

Read this. It's from Jeremy Wilkey at MX-Tech suspension, posted on DRN.

"Seal care Guide.. version 1.o
MX-Tech Seal care guide:

What makes seals fail, and how can you improve their life? I’ve found the main culprit to seal life has always been dirt. So the real question is how does one prevent dirt from entering the seal.

At the track:
After your ride take a towel and wipe down the exterior of chrome leg. Dirt and dirt film will dry on the tube while you have your break. The first time you compress the fork these small to large particles will be swept into the seal. This is the begging of the leak. If you take the time to keep grunge from drying on the tube, or getting it off before you ride you’ll double your seal life.

At the wash:
Avoid the power washer; in our day and age of instant gratification, I’m sure you will all ignore this rule. That being the case doesn’t point the hose at the seal, or at the chrome. The high pressure can deflect and ram dirt caught in the dust wipers groves right into the seal. After you’ve washed you bike take a towel and clean the forks. Those little water spots are dirt and mineral residue. Mineral residue is sharp and seals don’t like sharp things adhered to the chrome.

At the shop:
Invest in a good seal driver; the home made one is going to cause problems. Use a seal bullet or bag when installing new seals. Always lube the seal with good seal grease. Replace the dirt scrapper and wiper as a set and don’t reuse worn bushings. Follow these steps and you’ll find that every will have a longer seal life.

URBAN fork lore:
Tying you bike down over night or all week does not cause seal problems. The pressure inside a fork actually increases its tendency to seal. If you have a leak after doing this it’s from an imperfection (damage already done) and the extra internal pressure is just helping push oil out.
Bleeding your forks is a good idea for good performance, but has little to do with the seal’s life. If you fail to do this and notice a leak, it’s from the same root cause as the bike being tided down myth of above."

Here's a link to the original thread.


Seal Care Guide

  • John_Lorenz

Posted May 23, 2002 - 02:51 AM

#23

Thats why I am the EGOAHOLE
I am simply "RIGHT" all the time

URBAN fork lore:
Tying you bike down over night or all week does not cause seal problems. The pressure inside a fork actually increases its tendency to seal. If you have a leak after doing this it’s from an imperfection (damage already done) and the extra internal pressure is just helping push oil out.
Bleeding your forks is a good idea for good performance, but has little to do with the seal’s life. If you fail to do this and notice a leak, it’s from the same root cause as the bike being tided down myth of above."


[ May 23, 2002: Message edited by: EgoAhole ]

  • sirthumpalot

Posted May 23, 2002 - 04:12 AM

#24

Seal discussion aside, springs do loose their "springiness" after being compressed for long periods of time. That's why your torque wrench tells you to set it back to 0 when you're done. That's also why you have to check the valve spring free length to see if it's in spec when you work on the head. I don't have the manual in front of me but I'll bet that the suspension springs have free length values too. There are piles of examples... Is keeping the forks compressed in the truck for a few hours at a time enough to make a noticeable difference? I honestly don't know, but while we're trying to figure it out I'm going to use a 2x4. :)

  • z4me

Posted May 23, 2002 - 04:39 AM

#25

Using a prroperly sized 2x4 you can really get the bike solidly in the back of the truck.

On another note, I connect the tiedown hooks together with bunjee cords. That way, if slack ocurrs in the tie down from a bump in the road, the hooks stay in place due to the tension on them from the bunjee cords.

  • John_Lorenz

Posted May 23, 2002 - 04:40 AM

#26

SirThumpy

You are comparing apples to oranges here. There is a major differance in the make up and compound of the springs that are used in your senarios.

A torque wrench, the primary reason for setting the torque value back to 0 is to maintain its calibration just like dial calipers and such like scales for example same principle. In these cases springs are used to calibrate or adjust.


Valve Springs, Like any other engine or heat generating component aka clutch springs, piston return springs or Irish Spings, the metals and forging of these items are at a higher tinsil strenght. These also get a far harsher beating then Fork Springs.


Fork Springs / Shock Spring, Yes they do have a free lenght spec as well as a compression spec. and with timne they wear out or go Limp (Viager Time), that is the evolution of it all, everything wears out in time.

Engineers factor in these things including compression and usage and tie down and many other components when they design these thigs.

Here is the bototm line:
1: Do the springs benifit from the Placibo effect called Fork Savers (Probably Not)
2: Does the Placibo Effect called Fork Savers give peace of mind to the user (Probably So)
3: How many times will the user replace Fork Springs in his or Her or Its live time, becouse of tie downs (Never)
4: Do the Placibo Effect Called Fork Savers Save Seals (Debatable)
5: Does the Placibo Effect Called Fork Savers make mega dollors for the Manufacturer (Definetly)

Just my $4.26 worth I will not say anything more
:) Oh ego say it aint so

  • freestyle111

Posted May 23, 2002 - 04:44 AM

#27

i use the seal saver and bikes never come loose.i dont use it because im worried about saving fork seals.i use it because if im transporting more than 1 bike i dont have to worry about handlebars hitting against bike next to it.i fit 3 bikes in back of chevy longbed no problem i just put sealsaver on bike in center.

  • BigDesto

Posted May 23, 2002 - 05:32 AM

#28

If you use any type of support, you should take a bungee cord to make sure it stays in place! If it comes undone you will lose your bike! :) I've seen it happen. The stress of tying your bike down really should'nt have any effect on the seals,But i do think that over time your springs will suffer. My heavy ass street bike ALWAYS goes on its center stand! This is to take the load off the springs! Same for my dirtbike it gets placed on the stand when it's in the garage. Springs will loose there free length measurement, if you have a constant load on them over time..My 2 cents!

  • MXOldtimer

Posted May 23, 2002 - 05:48 AM

#29

Years ago I almost lost a bike when hitting a bump and the tie down unhooked, it caught on the side of the trailer before going all the way to the pavement. Every since that day I've used carabiners (and soft ties) and I don't have to cinch the front end down very tight at all.

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • John_Lorenz

Posted May 23, 2002 - 06:45 AM

#30

Oldtimer

I saw a trailer disconnect on a downhill heading towards Reno for a short track.

Man oh Man it was so funning to see the guy's face when he realized his bikes just passed him..... :)
Shhhhhaaaaaawwwiiiiiiiiiiiinnnnnnnggggggg

[ May 23, 2002: Message edited by: EgoAhole ]

  • beezer

Posted May 23, 2002 - 09:57 PM

#31

I welded my bike to the bed of my truck. That way it can't fall out, be stolen or try and smash me like a bug when I do something stupid on it. I also put jack stands under my trucks frame so the springs don't sag. I also make my wife wear support bras so she won't get droopy. So there!!!

  • Fastest1

Posted May 23, 2002 - 10:39 AM

#32

BASSR! Pull the dust seals down and wipe out the grease! I did this on the reccommendation of some people here at this site. It was a mistake. I have never had problems with fork seals on any of my bikes. I thought this would be a good idea so I tried it. ONE ride and my fork seals were toast! I believe the grease trapped and held contaminants to the leg just long enough for them to pass the seal and tear them up. Also after talking to John @ JM Racing he did not recommend it. Keep the fork legs spotless and you will not have any problems. Cya

  • Shawn_Mc

Posted May 23, 2002 - 11:12 AM

#33

Ill never forget this, I was just a kid, about half asleep in the campershelled bed of my buddies dads truck. He had a shelf for the lack of a better term, in the bed that myself and my two friends were concking out on, when my friends brand new 1974 MX125 fell off the trailer, stayed hooked by one tiedown and dragged down the highway for a good half mile, all the while, the dads were driving home, bullcrapping and finishing the day with some well earned beers. It only had about 2 1/2 hours on it, and it was trashed.

  • Hick

Posted May 23, 2002 - 11:16 AM

#34

Originally posted by Fastest1:
BASSR! Pull the dust seals down and wipe out the grease! I did this on the reccommendation of some people here at this site. It was a mistake.


I have to chime in here and say I’ve had the same experience. This trick may work in some conditions, but if you ride in sand it definitely does not.

  • newto2wheels

Posted May 23, 2002 - 02:02 PM

#35

Just buy the $60 ATK bike shoe that locks the bike in place for your $6000 bike!

  • yznvegas

Posted May 23, 2002 - 03:01 PM

#36

new to wheels, does that work in the back of a pickup truck?

  • Scarpasl7

Posted May 23, 2002 - 03:31 PM

#37

Better than a 2 x 4 is an old rear shock spring.

It holds in place better than either the shock support or a 2 x 4 because it provides its own kinetic resistance. Oh yea, and it does not have splinters or nails in it - give me a break.

  • yznvegas

Posted May 23, 2002 - 03:59 PM

#38

Damn scarpals, that makes A LOT OF SENSE. Now I just need to wear my rear spring out so I can use it.... :) :D





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