XR650R or WR450


59 replies to this topic
  • needsprayer

Posted April 16, 2004 - 07:27 PM

#21

Is that pressing up trying to get out of bed? J/K :) :D

Lifting is more a matter of proper technique. I got in a hurry once and muscled the BRP up in sand by gripping the handlebars (as if riding)and lifting straight up. I screwed up by bending my top arm at the elbow and not bringing the triceps into play. Caused a small bicep tear. Didn't stop me from riding the rest of the day, but it did take about 6 weeks to heal. :D

  • flyinW

Posted April 19, 2004 - 09:44 AM

#22

It lands like an airplane being shot down at times!



LMAO ...

Ya... they don't get heavy til the wheels quit rollin. :)

  • RidesRed

Posted April 19, 2004 - 10:30 PM

#23

In its element, the xr650r can not be beat. Out of its element however, it is a hard-to-ride, tiring-as-hell, why-did-I-take-this-bike-today BIG RED PIG! It is a very specialised bike. On big long hard fast dirt roads with sweeping curves, it is unbelievable. You will fall in love. Best damn bike ever, is what you'll think. On loamy soil with anything resembling tight turns(this is where its weight begins to show), it will make you wish you hadnt ridden that day. Lets just say if there are going to be obstacles to be avoided (as opposed to simply being ridden over) then the xr650r is not the bike for you. The WR is so much better as a general trail bike. The xr650 just wasnt meant to ride trails, and it shows. As far as dual-sporting, the WR is a viable candidate. Its quicker, its lighter, and its an all-around more versatile bike. Reliabilty HAS been an issue with the yamaha yzf/wr bikes though, and that is where the xr650r is simply without equal. It is an incredibly reliable machine. My xr650r has become an adventure-tourer, and in that role, I truly love the bike. :) go troops!

  • RingKingPin

Posted April 20, 2004 - 04:17 AM

#24

:naughty:On loamy soil with anything resembling tight turns(this is where its weight begins to show), it will make you wish you hadnt ridden that day

I beg to differ kind sir! I ride with many mx style bikes in tight woods in Michigan, Indiana and really never have a problem keeping up. Just last weekend we rode about 60 miles of woods it was myself on my 650r a 125 who suffered, a 250 and a crf450. I smoked the 250 and 125 all day and couldn't come close to the 450 simply because he is a VERY FAST rider. On any oppurtunity to go on a straight away, I'd spank them all with 13/48 gearing. If you aren't used to riding the 650r in tight stuff, I think it is just a matter of learning to use the weight it has to it's advantage. As soon as you start to fight the bike, the battle is over and you lose. Gas and weave! :)

  • qadsan

Posted April 20, 2004 - 05:16 AM

#25

As soon as you start to fight the bike, the battle is over and you lose. Gas and weave!



Learning to relax and shift my weight around more often has helped me greatly, but I have to conciously keep myself aware of this or else I find myself trying to whip my bike around like the two strokes I was so used to and then its game over before too long. A lighter bike is no doubt a better choice in the tight stuff, but staying relaxed and shifting my weight around more often has helped me to improve my pace for longer periods of time.

  • RidesRed

Posted April 20, 2004 - 06:11 PM

#26

:naughty:On loamy soil with anything resembling tight turns(this is where its weight begins to show), it will make you wish you hadnt ridden that day

I beg to differ kind sir! I ride with many mx style bikes in tight woods in Michigan, Indiana and really never have a problem keeping up. Just last weekend we rode about 60 miles of woods it was myself on my 650r a 125 who suffered, a 250 and a crf450. I smoked the 250 and 125 all day and couldn't come close to the 450 simply because he is a VERY FAST rider. On any oppurtunity to go on a straight away, I'd spank them all with 13/48 gearing. If you aren't used to riding the 650r in tight stuff, I think it is just a matter of learning to use the weight it has to it's advantage. As soon as you start to fight the bike, the battle is over and you lose. Gas and weave! :D



The xr650r SUCKS in soft, loamy soil where tight turns are required! Thats my story, and I am stickin to it!!! All that mass just doesnt like stickin..the front wants to push-out like a prom queen during un-protected sex. The wr450f is much better for any type of riding where TURNS are required. But dont take my word for it, just look at how many GNCC riders choose xr650r's. And there is this other guy...Johnny Cambell, who doesnt like the xr650r for twisty courses either..he rides a crf450r for those. Just food for thought... :)

  • RingKingPin

Posted April 22, 2004 - 09:39 AM

#27

just look at how many GNCC riders choose xr650r's

wasn't that an xr650r that S. Summers was racing on last year? :)

  • RidesRed

Posted April 22, 2004 - 09:32 PM

#28

just look at how many GNCC riders choose xr650r's

wasn't that an xr650r that S. Summers was racing on last year? :)


Guess again. Scot rode an XR600R. But that was year-before-last. Secondly, Scot no longer rides an XR600R...care to guess what bike he rides this year? I hate to break the news, but its a CRF450R :D

Okay, now after hearing about what a great GNCC bike the XR650R is...I am just waiting to hear from some guy who claims Ricky Carmichael won back-to-back supercross championships on an XR650R :D

  • cat0020

Posted April 23, 2004 - 03:01 AM

#29

I'm 5'10", 145 lb. with riding gear on me, very much a beginner to off-road riding. Most of the off-road riding I've done is in the Pine Barrons in NJ, Jim Thrope, PA. or the trails in my backyard. Back in 2002, I rode my KTM LC4 Adventure strapped with 90+ lb. of camping gear on the Contenental Trail for 200 some miles in Colorado.
I currently have a XR650R and a WR250F. Comparing to my experience of riding the KTM LC4 Adventure, the XR650R is a very powerful machine with much less weight.
I'm still trying to get used to reving the engine on the WR250F to get the power out of that tiny 250 engine.
Most of the time, I like the XR650R better than the WR250F, only after a good 90 minutes of riding that I wish the XR was lighter.

  • qadsan

Posted April 23, 2004 - 06:00 AM

#30

Scott Summers rode some races on a 650R. I'm sure he would have raced more on a 650R if he hadn't been injured, but most serious racers will always transition to the newer bike for several reasons. It's also in Honda's best interest to have their riders on their newest bikes.

Here's some quick clips where Summers is mentioned on a 650R.
http://www.motorcycl...9/day0910b.html
"Honda will support Scott Summers in the AMA Grand National Cross Country series and Johnny Campbell in the Baja 1000 and 500. Both will ride the new XR650R."

http://www.racerxill...rs_comeback.cfm
"But Summers has been riding very well, and according to his agent Fred Bramblett, his oft-injured leg is totally pain free. Over the weekend, at a SETRA Hare Scramble in Abbeville, South Carolina, Summers romped home with a win in front of a stacked lineup of GNCC talent, including Hawk in Second, Kawasaki's Chuck Woodford in third and Jason Raines in fourth. All three of these riders had won GNCCs in 2002, and yet Summers was able to best them all on a 2000 Honda XR650."

http://www.motoworld...988764000.jhtml
"Retired five-time GNCC Champion Scott Summers surprised everyone when he entered the Vet A class on a Honda XR650."

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  • RidesRed

Posted April 23, 2004 - 11:45 AM

#31

Thanks for straightening me out on that qadsan. I had no idea Scot had actually ridden a xr650r in competition. I was wrong to say he hadn't. My being wrong about that, however, doesnt change the fact that Scot did not return to racing on an xr650r. And not returning on an XR650R after having actually competed on it (briefly) PROVES that it wasnt his #1 choice for woods work. It isnt my #1 choice for woods work either. And that is the only point I ever made. The XR650R is not idealised for tight, twisty, soft soil riding. It is idealised for high-speed desert racing. Of course it can be ridden in virtually any condition. I ride mine in every imaginable condition. But when I take my XR650R up my local 17 mile-long, dry, sandy, twisty, rock-strewn creek bed(its not the riding area per se, its part of the route back home) it really makes me wish I had taken another bike. It really does SUCK in those conditions. On the contrary, when I take the bike out on our miles-long dirt roads (hard-to intermediate soil, with long, sweeping curves), I fall in love with my XR650R all over again. This is where the XR650R is truly at home, and where no other bike on earth compares.

  • qadsan

Posted April 23, 2004 - 01:50 PM

#32

I think he had is initial serious injury on the 650r as I recall shortly after the 650r came out (my memory is fuzzy on this and I could be very wrong). If he hadn't been injured and out of racing for so long, he probably would have racked up some victories on the 650r, but then the CRF450 came out. I watched him race the XR650R on TV a time or two (after the CRF450 was out) and heard from friends who said he initially used conventional forks from his 650R on the CRF450 until he figured out how to best setup his CRF450 USD forks. Racing the CRF450 with the 650r conventional forks certainly raised some eyebrows :)

If we could only trim another 50lbs or so from our 650r's, I'd be even happier :D

  • RidesRed

Posted April 23, 2004 - 06:31 PM

#33

I just took my KX125 out on my loop today..including that sandy, twisty, rock-strewn creek. The difference between the kx and the XR650 is unbelievable. Whats most interesting, is the 650 gives up its power advantage in roost, where as the 125 hooks up pretty well in the deep sand and just accelerates. My brother was with me, he riding the 650. On hard pack, where the 650 can hook up, he was pulling away in every gear. In the sand however, I was able to keep up in the straights, and literally ride circles around him in the corners. That KX wieghs 195 pounds soaking wet. The XR650 is a bit more than that, plus I have the six gallon tank (it had 4 gallons in it when we started our ride). Needless to say, when I finished the loop on the 125, i was pumped! Felt great, ready to ride some more. When I do that same loop on the xr650, I am done. Exhuasted. Too tired to do any more riding. I admit, I am talking about serious hardcore-technical terrain, but the difference in the amount of effort expended to get each of the bikes to do the same thing is enormous. Multiply the effort for each task over several hours of riding, and the 650 takes its toll. Conversely, when I take the 650 out on high-speed fire roads, after hours in the saddle I am pumped, feeling great, and ready to ride some more.

  • msm650

Posted April 23, 2004 - 10:22 PM

#34

If the BRP can't propel you through the "rock strewn creek" and other parts of your technical loop faster than the mini kx125, than you're too small and do not have the strength to ride the pig in anything but street like conditions. If I was faster on a 125, the XR would not be in my garage right now-plain and simple. It is a big/strong man's dirtbike. 125's and their weed-whacker like torque are best left to horse jockeys and pre-pubescent boys.

  • big t

Posted April 23, 2004 - 10:39 PM

#35

If the BRP can't propel you through the "rock strewn creek" and other parts of your technical loop faster than the mini kx125, than you're too small and do not have the strength to ride the pig in anything but street like conditions. If I was faster on a 125, the XR would not be in my garage right now-plain and simple. It is a big/strong man's dirtbike. 125's and their weed-whacker like torque are best left to horse jockeys and pre-pubescent boys.

Right on!

  • scorch

Posted April 24, 2004 - 03:13 PM

#36

If the BRP can't propel you through the "rock strewn creek" and other parts of your technical loop faster than the mini kx125, than you're too small and do not have the strength to ride the pig in anything but street like conditions. If I was faster on a 125, the XR would not be in my garage right now-plain and simple. It is a big/strong man's dirtbike. 125's and their weed-whacker like torque are best left to horse jockeys and pre-pubescent boys.



:)

  • RidesRed

Posted April 24, 2004 - 03:19 PM

#37

If the BRP can't propel you through the "rock strewn creek" and other parts of your technical loop faster than the mini kx125, than you're too small and do not have the strength to ride the pig in anything but street like conditions. If I was faster on a 125, the XR would not be in my garage right now-plain and simple. It is a big/strong man's dirtbike. 125's and their weed-whacker like torque are best left to horse jockeys and pre-pubescent boys.


Put up or shut your hole. Come to Ely Nevada. Bring your XR650R, and lets race through the "rock-strewn creek". If your man enough to ride as well as you talk, PM me and I'll give you contact information to get a hold of me. I'll even put you up for the visit, in a local hotel. As for the KX125, it has LESS torque than a weed-whacker. I weigh 220 pounds, and I am 40 years old. So much for your horse-jockies and pre-pubescent boys. Your problem with 125's is you can't carry enough speed through turns or up hills to keep one "on-the-pipe" (in other words, you can't ride). Come on out. Be sure to bring a GPS, a lot of talent, and many changes of underwear. Be extra sure to leave the excuses at home. Before you accept, be sure to consider how you'll feel after getting spanked by a 40-year-old on a bike that has less-than-half the power of yours. If you are a big/strong enough man to risk, and handle, some embarassment, lets ride.

  • CRF450X

Posted April 24, 2004 - 06:52 PM

#38

Now THAT sounds like a challenge!! I happen to own a XR650R. I also own a new CRF250X. I have also been to Ely Nevada on a Dual Sport outing. I was the only guy with a XR650R. Everyone else had XR650(L)s those cheesy Kawasaki DLR(?) ect ect. Well let me tell you. I and everyone else were ok until we hit some harder trails up there in ELY! Talk about some serious terrain! Since I was the only one with a true Dirt Bike I was asked to bring up the rear (go figure). That was the longest day riding I have ever spent helping them poor guys pick up there TRULLLLLLLY HEAVY BIKES! I must say he is right. XR650R(s) have there place and trails like that are not IT! I love my XR650R but they are just to heavy for trails like that. Thats why I have a CRF250X now (will Dual Sport soon). And before someone questions my man hood I am 36 years old and weigh 217 lbs. 5'11" and consider my self a decent rider. Yes there are better riders than me but I can go every place they go just a little slower.

  • RidesRed

Posted April 24, 2004 - 06:57 PM

#39

If the BRP can't propel you through the "rock strewn creek" and other parts of your technical loop faster than the mini kx125, than you're too small and do not have the strength to ride the pig in anything but street like conditions. If I was faster on a 125, the XR would not be in my garage right now-plain and simple. It is a big/strong man's dirtbike. 125's and their weed-whacker like torque are best left to horse jockeys and pre-pubescent boys.

Right on!


This from a guy who rides a quad and a harley. By the way...how is that twin-cam 88 holding up? :)

  • CRF450X

Posted April 24, 2004 - 07:12 PM

#40

Do some of us XR650R owners trully believe that the XR650R is the end all bike. PLEASE! It was designed as a Desert Race bike! Not a trail bike! Yes I have taken it on some trails that would have some of you pissing your pants. But it sure was not what I would have picked if there had been anything lighter on top of that cliff/trail! I'm not a 2 stroke guy but I do know my son on his CR125R has to keep it (on the pipe) when he is trying to keep up with me on hilly terrain. I also know that If this Rides red or red rider what ever-is on a 125 and calls you out on your 650 then you need to either accept his challenge (like a BIG/STRONG man) or shut that, what did he call it OH YAH or shut that hole up! Either way you look like an idiot unless you go up there to Ely and (proove him wrong) and let me tell you, you will be in for one hell of a ride! Hell I'll even drive up there (from Las Vegas) and watch this! HELL if you live in the Las Vegas area I will trailer your XR650R and you up there (no charge). I gotta see this. I bet you' ll have some excuse as to why you cant go like I live in New York or something. Put up or SHUT UP my YOUNG friend! PM me if you need that ride!





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