Slippin


13 replies to this topic
  • Kritter

Posted March 10, 2004 - 01:43 PM

#1

I was out markign the loop for this weekends coming race and in some sections it was quite fast and some was quite sandy... when I would click a gear up and get on it, it felt like it had a 5 second delay before it got up and going...I couldnt pin point if it was slipping or if it was delayed shifting. It also sometimes goes to neutral when shifting downwards towards first and I am hard on the lever so I know it is going down all the way, for example some tight 2nd gear trail comes to a base of a hillclimb and I jam it in 1st and the thing goes to neutral and pisses me off!

Any ideas? The bike has under 1000 miles on it but that is a lot of slow speed,over revving, coolant spitting, technical nasty stuff.

Oil has been changed twice since new...15-50 mobil 1.

  • irondude

Posted March 10, 2004 - 01:48 PM

#2

try adjusting the clutch ? Thats the first thing i would look at...

Mine jumps out of second into neutral some time as well- i split the cases and everything was perfect--so i stopped sweating it...

What race?!

  • SaltyWalrus

Posted March 11, 2004 - 01:23 AM

#3

When you shift up a gear and get on it...during the 5 second delay, is the motor reving, but the bike not accelerating? If so, clutch slippage. Could it be the synthetic oil? I haven't heard of anyone having a problem with synthetic, but clutch slippage is the theoretical concern. If it is clutch slippage, you could try conventional oil (mobile delvac 15-40 for example), stiffer clutch springs, adding a steel clutch plate (p/n: 22321-KA4-710) to take up space as clutch wears (see: http://xr650r.us/clutch/). Seems like low miles to be having clutch problems though. :)

  • Kritter

Posted March 11, 2004 - 09:33 AM

#4

What race?!


D37 race this weekend...gonna be a fast course.

  • Rockjockey

Posted March 11, 2004 - 04:51 PM

#5

If your synthetic oil is not motorcycle specific,the friction reducers in the automotive oil can play hell on your clutches. :)

  • Kritter

Posted March 11, 2004 - 08:20 PM

#6

no reducers in 15w50...its non energy conserving.

  • Beserker

Posted April 02, 2010 - 09:43 AM

#7

Hey guys ... quick question about the stiffer clutch spring. Why? and what advantages/disadvantages.

My bike has about 10k mi on it, and rolling on hard in 3/4/5, feels like the clutch is slipping. At first I thought it was slight wheelspin, but at a recent open dyno day, the dyno guy said he picked up clutch slip (without me prompting him)

Any toughts..thanks!

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  • Bbasso

Posted April 02, 2010 - 01:07 PM

#8

sounds like you have your questioned answered... time to order a clutch and install.

but if you need to test it further, ride about 25mph toss it in 5th gear and hold it open. if it revs without accelerating then deff clutch.

  • Beserker

Posted April 02, 2010 - 01:34 PM

#9

sounds like you have your questioned answered... time to order a clutch and install.


Thanks Bbasso..I realise that, my question is more about stiffer clutch springs. I notice hop-up kits has it as part of the kit, or the guys do it at the same time when they go searching for some elusive HP.

My bike is bog standard, but with an Akropovic slip on and K&N Filter (makes about 49 on the dyno) and I was wondering why one would go the stiffer clutch spring route.

If it plays a role, we tend to ride a lot of sand (beach as well as river/canyon "ball bearing" sand, and when it gets tight, the engine lugs a bit)

  • HeadTrauma

Posted April 02, 2010 - 01:55 PM

#10

and I was wondering why one would go the stiffer clutch spring route.


Stiffer springs increase clamping force on the plates so the clutch can hold more torque before slipping. The disadvantage is that it requires more force from your hand to operate it. That said, these engines seldom make more torque than the stock clutch components can cope with, even with builds making a lot more power than stock. If your clutch is slipping and it is adjusted properly, it's time for replacement.

  • Beserker

Posted April 02, 2010 - 03:25 PM

#11

That said, these engines seldom make more torque than the stock clutch components can cope with, even with builds making a lot more power than stock.


HeadTrauma...I'm about to replace the clutch, and 'cos I order my stuff from the States, and postage is considerable, I was investigating the springs, if worthwile, getting all in one go.

From your response I believe it is not necessary...I hoped it would increase clutch lifespan in the areas where I ride most. I tend to do a lot of desert type riding, form photo's I've seen here on TT, I would liken it to Arizona or your Copper Canyon, but next to the sea. Obviously the bike shines in the wide open areas, but the place is interspersed with mountainous areas as well...slow 1st and 2nd gear stuff that can take an hour or so to cross, and the clutch takes a beating there.

Thank you for the reply though...and yes I did search (but the force has left me on this). The reason I posted to the old threats (like you pointed out...9 yrs..wow!) was because I could see some of the original contributers are on-line..it is like 3 am over here, right now. Cheers!

  • BRP Chaos

Posted April 02, 2010 - 09:23 PM

#12

If I need it right now I don't even use the clutch, just jam it in the gear I want. Saves on the clutch and the gear case seems to take it. A throw back from the moto days. Clutch was only for the start. Then again maybe my tranny days are limited. Something to think about. How tough are the XR gearboxes???

  • Beserker

Posted April 03, 2010 - 12:38 AM

#13

How tough are the XR gearboxes???


:thumbsup: Tuff enough..I do the clutchless shifts as well...but...rocky, slippery ascents can be tough on clutch (not that I had problems)

I was wondering if stiffer springs has a positive contribution to above, also if there were negatives from the harder pull on clutch. I can live with it being harder on your hands, but does it place undue stress on the clutch arm, bearings etc.

It seems though the OEM is fine, and unless I come across a compelling reason to go stiffer, I'll stick to the standard ones.

  • BRP Chaos

Posted April 04, 2010 - 08:40 AM

#14

:thumbsup: Tuff enough..I do the clutchless shifts as well...but...rocky, slippery ascents can be tough on clutch (not that I had problems)

I was wondering if stiffer springs has a positive contribution to above, also if there were negatives from the harder pull on clutch. I can live with it being harder on your hands, but does it place undue stress on the clutch arm, bearings etc.

It seems though the OEM is fine, and unless I come across a compelling reason to go stiffer, I'll stick to the standard ones.


Yup Berserk, I guess if the tranny can't take it I'll find out the hard way on the trail one day! Till then It seems to be handling the limited clutchless shifting fine!





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