Best Traction for Dirt Road?



18 replies to this topic
  • dirtpaw12

Posted April 06, 2016 - 06:39 PM

#1

I have a 01 YZ426F and I'm having trouble getting traction on my dirt road that I ride on. I don't know if it's the tires that I'm riding on or my driving or just the bike in general, anyway what is the best way to get traction on my dirt road? Any specific technique that I could follow? P.S. I have a 52 tooth rear sprocket if that makes a difference.



  • mlatour

Posted April 06, 2016 - 07:47 PM

#2

Need more infos,

 

-make/model or rear tire, what psi do you run, how worn is it

 

-have you set the proper rear suspension sag

-what do you weight ?

-stock shock spring ?

 

-older bike, has the shock been serviced lately, if not the nitrogen pressure is likely low



  • ass

Posted April 07, 2016 - 02:35 AM

#3

I have a 01 YZ426F and I'm having trouble getting traction on my dirt road that I ride on. I don't know if it's the tires that I'm riding on or my driving or just the bike in general, anyway what is the best way to get traction on my dirt road? Any specific technique that I could follow? P.S. I have a 52 tooth rear sprocket if that makes a difference.



I have noticed a lack of traction on extremely hard packed dirt farmroads as well. Im no expert so feel free to ignore me. I get good traction in most places but a hardpacked road just wont let the tire dig in. There is likely a setup to get better grip on a hard surface but thats not my only terain, I get soft ground alot too so I just go with the slippery feel. When you pin it and the rear tire starts spinning just lean on it a little harder. In fact on hardpack like that I use the rear wheel as a clutch kinda, lean up go wide open and then weight the rear tire just enough to make the front want to come up but not quite. Works good for me but I eat a tire every 10 hours or so.

  • dirtpaw12

Posted April 07, 2016 - 05:01 AM

#4

The tire that I run is basically brand new only a few weekends on it and it is a regular Dunlop MX tires not sure of the specific model, not near the bike right now and I run the tire with pretty solid PSI because part of the small figure 8 track at my house includes a trail with a few roots and some hardpacked dirt and then some dirt with small roots. The guy that we bought the bike from had the bike set up for his weight and he was about 240 and I'm right around 255 now. The shock has not been service recently either. 


Need more infos,

 

-make/model or rear tire, what psi do you run, how worn is it

 

-have you set the proper rear suspension sag

-what do you weight ?

-stock shock spring ?

 

-older bike, has the shock been serviced lately, if not the nitrogen pressure is likely low

The tire that I run is basically brand new only a few weekends on it and are regular Dunlop MX tires not sure of the specific model, not near the bike right now and I run the tire with pretty solid PSI because part of the small figure 8 track at my house includes a trail with a few roots and some hard packed dirt and then some dirt with small roots. The guy that we bought the bike from had the bike set up for his weight and he was about 240 and I'm right around 255 now. The shock has not been service recently either. 


Edited by dirtpaw12, April 07, 2016 - 05:02 AM.


  • SenorThumpy

Posted April 07, 2016 - 05:10 AM

#5

Can you elaborate more about how you're riding and what the bike does when you can't get traction? Need some more info, its a rather vague statement. 

 

"pretty solid PSI" makes me think you're just running way too much air. What psi are you running? Should be around 12PSI. Air pressure makes a huge difference in traction. I wouldn't go below 10psi unless you run HD tubes. 



  • dirtpaw12

Posted April 07, 2016 - 05:13 AM

#6

Can you elaborate more about how you're riding and what the bike does when you can't get traction? Need some more info, its a rather vague statement. 

 

"pretty solid PSI" makes me think you're just running way too much air. What psi are you running? Should be around 12PSI. Air pressure makes a huge difference in traction. I wouldn't go below 10psi unless you run HD tubes. 

By pretty solid I mean that the rear tire is hard enough that I can't push it in with my thumbs, I'll make sure to check when I get home but I assume around 15 PSI but its just my guess. 



  • SenorThumpy

Posted April 07, 2016 - 05:19 AM

#7

Yea double check your air pressure and see if that makes a diff. 

 

Are you loosing traction when you crack the throttle in a straight line, when you're coming out of a corner, going up hill..? Is "loosing traction" the ass end just spinning and sliding around a little, are you digging a hole...? What kind of soil are you in? Clay, loam, sand, sandy loam, processed stone, gravel... 



  • dirtpaw12

Posted April 07, 2016 - 05:24 AM

#8

Yea double check your air pressure and see if that makes a diff. 

 

Are you loosing traction when you crack the throttle in a straight line, when you're coming out of a corner, going up hill..? Is "loosing traction" the ass end just spinning and sliding around a little, are you digging a hole...? What kind of soil are you in? Clay, loam, sand, sandy loam, processed stone, gravel... 

The traction issue is on a dirt road, semi hard packed. I'm loosing traction when I'm gunning in going in a straight line and the rear tire is just spinning so fast that I could go through all 5 gears very fast and yes it trenches the whole time I'm gunning it. 



  • cr-dude3

Posted April 07, 2016 - 05:26 AM

#9

Tires and technique make a difference. Remember the soil changes all during your ride, you have to adapt to the changing environment to enjoy the effect of your experience.



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  • dirtpaw12

Posted April 07, 2016 - 05:32 AM

#10

Tires and technique make a difference. Remember the soil changes all during your ride, you have to adapt to the changing environment to enjoy the effect of your experience.

So my best bet (on the dirt road) would be to put more weight on the rear tire? And would adjusting the sag for for my weight help with my traction issue?



  • HappyAndy

Posted April 07, 2016 - 05:36 AM

#11

It sounds like the loose nut behind the handlebar needs adjusting, and probably the tire pressure too.

  • used2Bfast

Posted April 07, 2016 - 05:36 AM

#12

Sounds like some good ol throttle control combined with a bit of rider weight transfer is needed, then. Just about any good dirt bike, and if the rider is so inclined...can over power the avail traction on a dirt road at Will. You've typically got loose over hardpack, thats going to move and slide across the harder under surface. Kinda like tiny ball bearings over a hard surface (over simplified). Just the way it is. 



  • SenorThumpy

Posted April 07, 2016 - 05:37 AM

#13

Ok, now we have something to work with. 

Your bike makes power and youre going to need to "find" traction through throttle control, clutch control and body position. On hard pack you're not really going to be able to just pin it to win it. You need to roll on the throttle and feel what the tire is doing while adjusting body position and limit how much power is being put to the ground based on available traction. You gotta be your own dynamic traction control. 

Do you ride in the "attack position"? Knees bent, head over bars, ass sticking out over the seat, arms bent? That position allows you to quickly and easily adjust where you're weighting the bike. 

Suspension should be set up according to your weight and the type of terrain you ride. You don't want to change settings based on one little scenario, everything else will suffer. 



  • cr-dude3

Posted April 07, 2016 - 05:39 AM

#14

So my best bet (on the dirt road) would be to put more weight on the rear tire? And would adjusting the sag for for my weight help with my traction issue?

 

The sag should be adjusted to 4" aproximatly, with you in full gear and full fluids before you ride, any dirt bike you ride should always be set this way. When the dude rides I stand, always, I let the bike follow the terrain and adjust my weight accordingly, on soft soil and sand its a good idea to get the weight over the rear wheel. In Texas our soil is concrete covered with sand, at least in DFW.



  • stevethe

Posted April 07, 2016 - 06:02 AM

#15

You sure your using a rubber tire? If so let air out until it hooks up.


Edited by stevethe, April 07, 2016 - 06:03 AM.


  • grayracer513

Posted April 07, 2016 - 06:40 AM

#16

The proper tire selection would be a knobby billed as a "hard surface" tire.  Air pressure should be around 15 pounds.

 

However, Most dirt roads won't offer you much traction regardless of what you put down on it.  They usually become an impenetrably hard packed surface with a layer of gravel on top that serves as bearings.  "Marbles" is what we used to call them.  Nothing really works very well. 



  • grayracer513

Posted April 07, 2016 - 07:03 AM

#17

You're not going to get good hook up.  Not on a dirt road with a YZ426 at full throttle.  Better hook up than you have, maybe, but never really good.  Going to have to learn to manage the power.



  • YHGEORGE

Posted April 07, 2016 - 11:11 AM

#18

It sounds like the loose nut behind the handlebar needs adjusting, and probably the tire pressure too.

This. Why set up a dirt bike to ride a dirt road? That is not a D/S bike, don't use it as such.



  • dirtpaw12

Posted April 07, 2016 - 12:24 PM

#19

This. Why set up a dirt bike to ride a dirt road? That is not a D/S bike, don't use it as such.

My track INCLUDES a dirt road along with trails. 







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