16 YZ450F Steering Stabilizer Set Up


16 replies to this topic
  • CSAR FE

Posted February 15, 2016 - 08:34 AM

#1

Are any of you guys running a damper on your 16 YZ450Fs yet? What setup are you running?  I use my bike primarily for desert riding so a damper is a must. I had a Scotts damper mounted on a BRP SUB mount kit, sitting on a set of Ride Eng triple clamps on my old CRF450R and really liked the setup, except that it raised the bars about an inch. I can't figure out for the life of me why I sold the bike with the damper on it but that's neither here nor there. Anyways, heres the few setups I'm looking at:

 

- Scotts Damper w/ BRP SUB mount and 22mm Ride Eng triple clamps (to help with the steering issues). This Setup is around $1000 and I am unsure of the compatibility between the BRP kit and the Ride Clamps. I would also need bars with a lower bend to offset the raise in bar height.

 

- Scotts -or- BRP SUB mount kit for OEM clamps. This setup runs around $500. For the steering issues, I could either raise the forks or install the DrD Engine Relocation Kit and leave the forks at factory height. It would still require a different set of bars for comfort.

 

- GPR V4 Fat Bar Stabilizer Kit. I am leaning more towards this setup at the moment because the damper profile is slimmer, and the kit only raises the bar an average of 3/8". Additionally, its the cheapest of the bunch at $480 shipped. The only issue is that Rocky Mountain shows the latest application is for the 15 YZ450F and I'm concerned about the compatibility with the 16 due to the change in triple clamp offset between the two years.

 

If anyone has any insight, please let me know. Pictures are also welcome.


Edited by CSAR FE, February 15, 2016 - 09:40 AM.


  • grayracer513

Posted February 15, 2016 - 09:00 AM

#2

You seem focused on the sub mount type mounting.  I prefer the bars in their normal position with the Scotts damper mounted to the bar clamp.  A hazard? Maybe, but that's why I wear a helmet and chest protection.  I've been hurt a lot worse by my thigh ramming into the hand guard mounts than by the damper.



  • Monk

Posted February 15, 2016 - 09:11 AM

#3

I don't understand the question. Yes, I run a stabilizer, yes it works great. I run a over the top mount for convenience. I can pull it off and switch to another bike in minutes. I also don't have to sacrifice and bar height with it being an over the bar mount...

  • Monk

Posted February 15, 2016 - 09:14 AM

#4

Also, I don't understand the "steering issues" you are referring to. You ride in the desert. The 2016 model was even more refined to make it better in fast stuff without sacrificing handling...

  • CSAR FE

Posted February 15, 2016 - 09:32 AM

#5

Also, I don't understand the "steering issues" you are referring to. You ride in the desert. The 2016 model was even more refined to make it better in fast stuff without sacrificing handling...

 

We have a little bit of everything here where I ride; not just long, straight washes and fire roads. Things get kind of tight and twisty in some areas as well. Honestly, I think a big part of the steering issues I'm having is really just getting used to the bike. It seems like getting the front tire to bite and not hop out of ruts and very dependent on your body position; much more so than any other bike I've ridden. 

 

At any rate, I appreciate your inputs. I never considered the top mounted damper for safety reasons. Grayracer, I understand your logic.

 

As far as being able to move the damper from bike to bike, I'm not concerned about that as I'm too poor to own multiple bikes at once.


Edited by CSAR FE, February 15, 2016 - 09:33 AM.


  • CSAR FE

Posted February 15, 2016 - 09:39 AM

#6

I don't understand the question. Yes, I run a stabilizer, yes it works great. I run a over the top mount for convenience. I can pull it off and switch to another bike in minutes. I also don't have to sacrifice and bar height with it being an over the bar mount...

My apologies for being unclear. The question is really, what steering damper setups are you guys running on your newer YZ450Fs? OP edited for clarity.



  • ckny

Posted February 15, 2016 - 09:43 AM

#7

I've only run a sub mount on a KTM, every Yamaha ive owned has had a top mount including my 15 FX.
From someone who has run a Scotts and a GPR, I would never go back to a GPR if I was paying for it.
I have had some big crashes and never had an issue with a top mount.

  • CSAR FE

Posted February 15, 2016 - 09:45 AM

#8

I've only run a sub mount on a KTM, every Yamaha ive owned has had a top mount including my 15 FX.
From someone who has run a Scotts and a GPR, I would never go back to a GPR if I was paying for it.
I have had some big crashes and never had an issue with a top mount.

 

What didn't you like about the GPR?



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  • Monk

Posted February 15, 2016 - 10:03 AM

#9

What didn't you like about the GPR?


Lack of adjustable features on the GPR vs the Scotts. No high-speed adjustment, no sweep, full resistance both directions...

And you just can't be Scotts customer service...

20150320_160005_zpslsac7p1v.jpg

  • CSAR FE

Posted February 15, 2016 - 10:13 AM

#10

Lack of adjustable features on the GPR vs the Scotts. No high-speed adjustment, no sweep, full resistance both directions...

And you just can't be Scotts customer service...

 

 

Thanks Monk. I think I'll go with the top mount. 

 

You're bike looks nice, BTW.



  • Monk

Posted February 15, 2016 - 10:20 AM

#11

Thanks Monk. I think I'll go with the top mount.

You're bike looks nice, BTW.


Looks rougher now.. Close to 200hrs on her now...

  • GHILL28

Posted February 15, 2016 - 10:46 AM

#12

'14 450F, I run a Scott's above the bar with a custom mount to allow for the different bar positions.  I've tried taller bar setups on this bike and hated the slow feel on initial lean-in.  I just run the lower FastWay pegs with the stock bars in the forward position (I'm 6'0).

 

I don't bother with the GPR's.  They are known for being unreliable around the SoCal desert races.  Seems like they're ALWAYS being serviced.  I hear they've gotten better, but Scott's got it right the first time and hasn't needed to change in 10 years or so.

 

No idea on the triple clamp offset.  Info from prior year bikes doesn't mean much either btw since they changed the front triangle geometry as well in 2016.  The offset got larger but other things changed as well.  In general Yamaha's have always done well with reduced offset though...



  • ckny

Posted February 15, 2016 - 11:01 AM

#13

What didn't you like about the GPR?


Pretty much what Monk said. I find them easy to service and I just love the people at Scott's, some of the best customer service in the industry. They take the time to answer any questions and work with you if you have a different set up. My last YZ250 had 22mm RG3's and they were happy to go over the measurements and find me the right post and clamp. At one time last year I had a Scotts on each of my 3 bikes.
I myself prefer to run a different HS and sweep setting than the stock setting so the adjustability works for me. Easy to adjust on the fly with a few clicks.

  • GHILL28

Posted February 15, 2016 - 11:03 AM

#14

That's the other thing - the people at Scott's are A+++.  I have no hesitations about giving them repeat business.  There are few brands in the recreational sports industry that earn that level of loyalty without discounts and blowout pricing, and they're one of them.



  • grayracer513

Posted February 15, 2016 - 12:06 PM

#15

As to why a damper would be necessary in the desert, it isn't a matter of the bike's inherent stability at speed as much as the fact that the desert is full of surprises.  Buried rocks or hard spots in soft surfaces can slap your front end nearly to the lock without warning.  Nice to have the front come right back to center and stay there, believe me.

 

And in well traveled sand, you'll find the bike pulling left and right because it's following what amounts to a buried rut.  The damper takes a lot of the work out

 

The Scotts' high speed circuit alone is worth any extra they charge for it.  GPR's don't have the feature, and as Monk said, they resist both swinging out and swinging back in, a functionality better suited to road bikes than dirt.  Scotts dirt bike dampers resist only swinging out, and the resistance to high and low speed maneuvers is independently adjustable, as is the "sweep" or range of motion damped, on both sides.  

 

It's also entirely user serviceable, and you can get any part you want for it. 

 

People who are new to the Scotts damper will often remark that it doesn't feel like it does anything.  I tell them that if it still feels like that after 3 weeks, take it off and take it for a ride (be sure you pull the pin out of the post).  They normally don't get very far before they come back to bolt it on again. 



  • CSAR FE

Posted February 15, 2016 - 02:26 PM

#16

As to why a damper would be necessary in the desert, it isn't a matter of the bike's inherent stability at speed as much as the fact that the desert is full of surprises.  Buried rocks or hard spots in soft surfaces can slap your front end nearly to the lock without warning.  Nice to have the front come right back to center and stay there, believe me.

 

And in well traveled sand, you'll find the bike pulling left and right because it's following what amounts to a buried rut.  The damper takes a lot of the work out

 

The Scotts' high speed circuit alone is worth any extra they charge for it.  GPR's don't have the feature, and as Monk said, they resist both swinging out and swinging back in, a functionality better suited to road bikes than dirt.  Scotts dirt bike dampers resist only swinging out, and the resistance to high and low speed maneuvers is independently adjustable, as is the "sweep" or range of motion damped, on both sides.  

 

It's also entirely user serviceable, and you can get any part you want for it. 

 

People who are new to the Scotts damper will often remark that it doesn't feel like it does anything.  I tell them that if it still feels like that after 3 weeks, take it off and take it for a ride (be sure you pull the pin out of the post).  They normally don't get very far before they come back to bolt it on again. 

I definitely agree with you. Besides hidden rocks out here, there are a lot of scumbags that think public land is also a place to dump trash, like old bricks and chunks of concrete. I have hit some of those things, both with and without a damper installed on my bikes in the past; they are the difference between a trip to the hospital and just a bent rim. 

 

Besides the safety aspect, I was able to ride my Scotts-equipped CRF all day as I spent less time fighting the bike, like you mentioned. They are worth every penny.



  • CSAR FE

Posted February 16, 2016 - 03:50 PM

#17

I called Scotts today and asked them if they had a setup for the 2016 yet and they weren't sure if the 2015 stuff would fit or not. They asked me to take measurements of the bar mounts and the distance from the steering stem and the front bolt holes on the bar clamps, per the instructions on their website. I called and gave them the measurements and he said "perfect", so I bought the bolt on kit. Hopefully it'll be here before the weekend! 

 

Thanks again for the help gents.







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