Dang those Yamaha engineers


12 replies to this topic
  • TN Dirt Rider

Posted January 17, 2016 - 07:03 AM

#1

So I got my new shock spring in for the '14 450F I recently purchased.  Was looking through the manual for any surprises before I go to change it later today....and I have to drain and remove the fuel tank!!!!  Seriously, that is a pain in the butt.

 

Has anybody been able to just drop the shock far enough down through the swing arm to change a spring without having to remove the fuel tank??  I'm hoping that will work, as I don't have a new fuel pump gasket which the manual says needs to be replaced after you pull the tank off.


Edited by TN Dirt Rider, January 17, 2016 - 07:03 AM.


  • GHILL28

Posted January 17, 2016 - 09:16 AM

#2

2 ways to do it w/o messing with the fuel:

 

Just remove the seat and the shock will come up behind the tank.  If you have an IMS tank, it becomes more of a PITA, but you still don't have to mess with the fuel.  You just remove the seat, silencer, tank bolts, and all subframe bolts except lower left, and then rotate the tank and subframe back a bit.

 

Or, loosen preload, remove lower shock bolt, remove linkage bolt from swingarm, then prop the rear wheel up in the air 6" or so, and the spring is easily accessed from the bottom of the bike.  This is what I do if I'm only changing the spring.



  • TN Dirt Rider

Posted January 17, 2016 - 10:40 AM

#3

Or, loosen preload, remove lower shock bolt, remove linkage bolt from swingarm, then prop the rear wheel up in the air 6" or so, and the spring is easily accessed from the bottom of the bike. This is what I do if I'm only changing the spring.


Yeah, that is what I ended up doing once my caffeine kicked in and my brain started working.

Thanks!

  • Darvo

Posted January 18, 2016 - 02:20 PM

#4

Is there not a quick release in the fuel line?  Removing the tank should only be a few minute job, and should not require draining the tank or a new fuel pump gasket.



  • GHILL28

Posted January 18, 2016 - 02:37 PM

#5

I haven't messed with the fuel line much, but I've been wondering the same thing.  For example, if I need to drain some gas into a water bottle for a buddies tank out on the trail, how do I do that easily?  Can that be done without making a huge mess?



  • TN Dirt Rider

Posted January 18, 2016 - 03:41 PM

#6

The instructions in the manual say to remove the tank you pump the gas out, then when you take off the tank there is a gasket between the bottom of the tank and the fuel pump, which then needs to be replaced.

I'm going to do everything I can to leave the tank on unless absolutely necessary.

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  • drtrcr400

Posted January 18, 2016 - 06:05 PM

#7

The instructions in the manual say to remove the tank you pump the gas out, then when you take off the tank there is a gasket between the bottom of the tank and the fuel pump, which then needs to be replaced.

I'm going to do everything I can to leave the tank on unless absolutely necessary.

You do realize you can remove the tank while leaving the pump attached and the fuel in right? Just unclip the fuel line at the tank and remove the harness.

  • TN Dirt Rider

Posted January 18, 2016 - 06:28 PM

#8

You do realize you can remove the tank while leaving the pump attached and the fuel in right? Just unclip the fuel line at the tank and remove the harness.


No I didn't, just read the manual for taking off the shock and that's what it said. Haven't had the bike long so I haven't done much work on it yet.

  • MxSkater86

Posted January 18, 2016 - 09:40 PM

#9

You don't even need to remove the tank. When I am servicing the shock I unbolt the tank and rotate it 180 degrees so it is sitting on the rear fender. Pull the shock out the top and then set the tank back in place without having to remove any fuel lines.



  • TN Dirt Rider

Posted January 18, 2016 - 09:55 PM

#10

You don't even need to remove the tank. When I am servicing the shock I unbolt the tank and rotate it 180 degrees so it is sitting on the rear fender. Pull the shock out the top and then set the tank back in place without having to remove any fuel lines.


Nice! Thanks for the tip. I was going to do everything in my power to keep the tank on and this should help.

  • GHILL28

Posted January 18, 2016 - 10:15 PM

#11

You do realize you can remove the tank while leaving the pump attached and the fuel in right? Just unclip the fuel line at the tank and remove the harness.

 

So if you unclip that fuel line, the line will drain backwards but the tank won't drain through it?

 

Is there an easy way to drain the tank from that point?



  • grayracer513

Posted January 19, 2016 - 07:22 AM

#12

Yeah.  Take the cap off and turn it upside down.

 

Seriously, though, the pump has a low pressure check, and while this may not seal off the fuel as effectively in every case as a petcock, it basically does keep the fuel from running out the line.  It has some potential to leak on the bench, though, which is likely why the risk abatement lawyers want the tank drained.  Removing the pump is written up as part of the tank procedure because that's how the manual is written; they have you take apart everything you take off.  If you want fuel out the line to say, fill a bottle, you would have to kick it to activate the pump.  Note that this will be fuel delivered under pressure, and not a graceful little stream, so all reasonable precaution should be taken to avoid fire, eye contact, etc. 



  • MidlifeCrisisGuy

Posted January 22, 2016 - 10:01 AM

#13

No fuel leaks out the fuel pump after you disconnect the line.  The connection fitting is tricky to understand, but once you do, it is simple.  Follow the instructions in the manual.   There is no need to drain the tank.  Not sure if you even need to disconnect the tank or just lift it up and slide it forward and prop it there, though that can be a hassle.

 

FWIW, I like changing the shock on the reverse engine bikes a lot better than removing the sub frame on the older bikes.  I hate fiddling with the carb-air box connection.

 

Caveat: I don't own a YZ450FX.  I'm speaking from my experience with my YZ250FX.







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