2014 yz450f aftermarket shock linkage


21 replies to this topic
  • yzUSMCf

Posted December 16, 2015 - 02:42 PM

#1

Having some trouble keeping my bike in a rut suspension is stock. Was thinking about adding a longer linkage. Anyone have experience/ success with this? Thanks.

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  • GHILL28

Posted December 16, 2015 - 03:05 PM

#2

Which end?  What sag/springs/rider weight?



  • Phil Hannah

Posted December 16, 2015 - 03:11 PM

#3

Having some trouble keeping my bike in a rut suspension is stock. Was thinking about adding a longer linkage. Anyone have experience/ success with this? Thanks.

Had a link on my 15. Felt it helped most in braking bumps,accel chop and lean in and front end traction when you got the chassis balance right . Myself didn't like raising forks more than 2-3mm. Felt 5 was to much. Typically ran sag 106-108 even with link. It was a good mod!

  • yzUSMCf

Posted December 16, 2015 - 03:15 PM

#4

110 sag, stock springs im around 200 in gear.

  • yzUSMCf

Posted December 16, 2015 - 03:16 PM

#5

I feel like its hard to keep it leaned over like it wants to straighten out and climb out my forks are at about 3mm up im the clamps.

  • GHILL28

Posted December 16, 2015 - 03:49 PM

#6

Where's the rear axle in the slot?  I had the "hard to lean" feeling when it was set back to take up some chain stretch.  New chain went on, axle adjusted back forwards to the stock position and the light, easy to drop over feeling came right back.  Surprising how little it took.


Edited by GHILL28, December 16, 2015 - 03:50 PM.


  • yzUSMCf

Posted December 16, 2015 - 08:55 PM

#7

I just put a new chain on its about in the center of adjustment.

  • GHILL28

Posted December 16, 2015 - 09:18 PM

#8

Stock valving?



  • Monk

Posted December 16, 2015 - 09:28 PM

#9

A linkage isn't going to help if you don't start learning to spin clickers, play with sag, fork oil height, axel position, handlebar position, tire selection, gearing, spring rates etc etc...

  • yzUSMCf

Posted December 17, 2015 - 07:45 AM

#10

I agree. Ive had the bike since june 2014 ive messed with quite diverse clicker settings, sag, oil height and all that . my next step would be revalve but i can not afford that at the moment. So i figured id look into a linkage..

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  • Monk

Posted December 17, 2015 - 07:58 AM

#11

A linkage is $300...

  • yzUSMCf

Posted December 17, 2015 - 09:59 AM

#12

A linkage is $300...

devol has one for 160

  • grayracer513

Posted December 17, 2015 - 10:23 AM

#13

What do you imagine it will do?



  • GHILL28

Posted December 17, 2015 - 10:41 AM

#14

If you want to lower the rear end, just use a spacer in the shock.  Cheaper and doesn't mess with the suspension dynamics as drastically.  Unless there's a really severe chassis imbalance issue that new springs can't solve, a linkage is usually a waste of money. 

 

Easiest thing you can do is slow the front rebound a couple of clicks or slightly drag the front brake to keep it down in a rut.



  • grayracer513

Posted December 17, 2015 - 02:38 PM

#15

Lowering the rear is pretty much opposite what you'd want if you're trying to get it to turn in easier and step up out of ruts to the outside.  It will also screw with your rear spring, as it affects the rising compression rate.



  • yzUSMCf

Posted December 17, 2015 - 04:04 PM

#16

What causes the bike to want to stand up in a rut? I just figured lower center of gravity would be better. Mabe i just need to come in faster and lean over deeper.

  • wes513v

Posted December 17, 2015 - 04:41 PM

#17

What causes the bike to want to stand up in a rut? I just figured lower center of gravity would be better. Mabe i just need to come in faster and lean over deeper.

Inertia makes the bike want to stand up. You are changing the trajectory of the bike and it is fighting it. You lean the bike farther to counteract that. As you lean more you have to increase speed to maintain the proper attitude through the corner.

Go up a tooth on the rear sprocket, It'll smooth the throttle response.

It's better to come into the corner at a lower speed and hit the rut properly and accelerate smoothly through. Overcook it into the turn and you will lose more ground on the exit than you made up coming in hot. Use the clutch to control acceleration instead of the throttle and you will be smoother through the rut. If you start to climb out its because you are looking to the outside of the rut(where your eyes go, you go) and you are being too abrupt with the throttle. You can also drag the front brake slightly to get it to drop back in. And finally, loosen your arms. The tendency is to tense up as you hit the rut, but if you loosen up the wheel will follow the rut better.

Run your forks a little higher in the clamps. I run mine at 10mm above the clamp and use the adjustable JGR link. It's made a great deal of difference in the corners.

Edited by wes513v, December 17, 2015 - 04:51 PM.


  • grayracer513

Posted December 17, 2015 - 08:06 PM

#18

What causes the bike to want to stand up in a rut? I just figured lower center of gravity would be better. Mabe i just need to come in faster and lean over deeper.

 

The advice Wes gave on technique is a lot more important than a small change in chassis set up.  Just to underscore the point about entry speed, coming in a little slower makes it easier to enter the rut on center and on balance, which makes it easier to relax, as Wes said. 

 

A lower CG does help.  Helps a lot, in fact.  But that isn't the only thing that changes when you lower the rear.  Unless you also lower the front the same amount, dropping the rear makes the steering head angle shallower, which encourages understeer, which causes the bike to climb out.  If you make the head angle steeper by either lowering the front or raising the rear, that makes the angle steeper, which quickens the steering, and can actually make the front wheel dig at the inside of a rut ("tucking under", or "knifing").  Lowering both ends would keep your current steering behavior while making it feel more nimble.



  • adam8781

Posted December 17, 2015 - 08:42 PM

#19

110 sag, stock springs im around 200 in gear.

 

run 100-105 sag, slide the forks up in the clamps to the first line, snug up the headset bearings to keep shake in check.  might help slow down front end rebound to keep it squatted in the corner



  • Drenmaster

Posted December 18, 2015 - 04:47 AM

#20

I have the JGR on my 14. one setting lower than stock. maybe like 3mm? it just made the bike feel more stable on braking bumps. 







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