09 YZ450 clutch


27 replies to this topic
  • Yzflier977

Posted October 05, 2015 - 10:32 AM

#21

Paul Thede with Race Tech had a saying years ago that is applicable here.  You only know as good as you've ridden.  Meaning if Tusk is as good as you know then that's the limit of your experience.  So you really can't compare anything else until you've run it.  I am in the category of anti Tusk.  Yes I've run a complete Tusk clutch pack in my 09 YZ450.  Initially it seem to shift fine, but then as time (and not a lot of time either, maybe 10 hours) wore on I started noticing notchy shifts and not full engagement and disengagement when the lever was pulled.  After some TT research I decide I would try a full OEM setup.  Poof, perfectly smooth shifting.  I understand the cost difference with OEM clutch packs versus something like Tusk, but as stated before, you do get what you pay for.  Just my 2 cents for what that's worth as someone who has run both Yamaha and Tusk clutch components.



  • emexcee380

Posted October 07, 2015 - 03:42 AM

#22

Paul Thede with Race Tech had a saying years ago that is applicable here.  You only know as good as you've ridden.  Meaning if Tusk is as good as you know then that's the limit of your experience.  So you really can't compare anything else until you've run it.  I am in the category of anti Tusk.  Yes I've run a complete Tusk clutch pack in my 09 YZ450.  Initially it seem to shift fine, but then as time (and not a lot of time either, maybe 10 hours) wore on I started noticing notchy shifts and not full engagement and disengagement when the lever was pulled.  After some TT research I decide I would try a full OEM setup.  Poof, perfectly smooth shifting.  I understand the cost difference with OEM clutch packs versus something like Tusk, but as stated before, you do get what you pay for.  Just my 2 cents for what that's worth as someone who has run both Yamaha and Tusk clutch components.

 

A well-reasoned argument supported with empirical data.  Thanks.



  • emexcee380

Posted October 13, 2015 - 10:57 AM

#23

Thanks for all the responses !

 

Grayracer513 your idea that the problem might be caused by a rich idle mixture seemed intriguing.

Especially in light of all the clutch components being replaced.  I forgot to mention it's got new springs

(TUSK !!!) as well.  (Sorry, I've had too much good luck with Tusk products to be able to wrap my

mind around them being the problem. Especially since the problem existed with OEM stuff initially.)

 

So last night we tweaked on the (Tusk) fuel screw to lean out the idle mixture.  It was set at 2.5 turns

out and idled okay at that setting.  We warmed the bike up and found the effective range where the

idle changed to be from 1.5 to 3 turns out.  We set it at the leaner setting (1.5) and did some initial

slam-on-the-rear-brake-with-clutch-in  stops and the stalling seemed to be improved.  More testing 

will be needed to confirm, but this could be the solution.

 

More info as it develops.....

 

(Sorry about the Tusk jabs....it's all in good humor !)

 

emexcee380

Hey Grayracer,  the fuel screw adjustment you recommended seems to have (almost) eliminated my son's stalling problem. Guess it wasn't clutch after all.  Thanks for your advice !   emexcee380



  • MotoFixation

Posted October 13, 2015 - 11:38 AM

#24

Is the clutch basket grooved? My buddy had the same problem with his 06 yz450 and his basket was grooved so what he did was took a file to the grooves and now it works great. Not only does it work but it is free! Good luck



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  • LongLiveTwoStrokes222

Posted October 13, 2015 - 11:48 AM

#25

Clutch Springs are my guess they're probably too short from being compressed and so the length isn't as long as it used to be, not allowing the clutch to fully disengage because it can't compress them as far.



  • grayracer513

Posted October 14, 2015 - 06:35 AM

#26

Hey Grayracer,  the fuel screw adjustment you recommended seems to have (almost) eliminated my son's stalling problem. Guess it wasn't clutch after all.  Thanks for your advice !   emexcee380

 

Yup.  You're welcome.

 

 

Is the clutch basket grooved? 

 

Clutch Springs are my guess they're probably too short from being compressed and so the length isn't as long as it used to be, not allowing the clutch to fully disengage because it can't compress them as far.

 

You two miss where he said it's fixed?  It might be fun to hear you elaborate on the theory that the springs can't compress far enough because they're too short, but you're not supposed to be on TT there at school in the first place. 



  • LongLiveTwoStrokes222

Posted October 14, 2015 - 06:58 AM

#27

Yup. You're welcome.




You two miss where he said it's fixed? It might be fun to hear you elaborate on the theory that the springs can't compress far enough because they're too short, but you're not supposed to be on TT there at school in the first place.

I guess we did haha. I read the thing about the clutch springs in a book by Eric Gorr it's called Four Stroke Motocross and Off Road Performance. Plus I had a KX250F that didn't have a notched basket and I put a brand new clutch pack in it cuz the clutch was slipping. Didn't help so I got a clutch cable thinking maybe it was stretched and that didn't help and I tried adjusting it all over the place. The only thing I didn't replace was the springs. So I think that might of been it. But in the book Eric says that's why in the service manuals it says to check how long the clutch springs are and if they are too short replace them. But I think thats what goes on when they're too short I could very well be wrong just from what I know how they work. And how did you know I was at school? When I'm on here at school it's because sometimes teachers will give us time if we finish early or they just feel nice and give us some free time. BTW you're super helpful on here and I appreciate you taking the time to help people like me. it means a lot to me cuz I'm going to make a job out of this stuff.

  • grayracer513

Posted October 14, 2015 - 05:47 PM

#28

If you're going to make a job of it, you need to start by being able to completely understand how a thing works when works the way it's supposed to work.  Not just how, but why.   That's the only way you'll ever be able to diagnose why it doesn't work.  If you don't understand the principles, and it's not in the book (happens daily), you won't be able to figure it out on your own when you have to.

 

Look at the conclusion you drew from what you read.  Your statement of the facts was that since the springs were no longer as long as they should have been, they couldn't be compressed to as short a length as they had been previously.  Why would having the spring take a set that results in it being 10% shorter than it originally was make it impossible for the spring to compress to the same minimum as it had before?  Are you aware of the fact that what typically limits the compression of a cylindrically wound coil spring is "coil binding", the point at which the coils lay hard against each other in a solid stack?  The wire doesn't get fatter with age, and the number of coils in the stack doesn't increase, so the spring can always compress to that same minimum.

 

Here's what Mr. Gorr actually said: Springs "sag" with age.  Individual springs may sag at differing rates. Sometimes they stiffen, sometimes they get mushy.  The result then can be uneven pressure applied across the pressure plate, causing the plate to tilt, causing the clutch to fail to release completely.  

 

Think more about what you read.  Understand how the thing works.  







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