Need a bit of front fork seal/leak/nick advice.


5 replies to this topic
  • Wristrockit

Posted August 03, 2015 - 03:22 PM

#1

I figured out why the right fork on my Wife's '14 WR450F is leaking. 

 

I already tried the business card under the seal trick once and it didn't work so I did it again and took a closer look at the offending fork tube.  I found a miniscule nick/burr/sliver kind of thing on the rear insideish area.  I didn't want to do anything stupid like take after it with steel wool or anything so I ever-so-carefully took my pocket knife and gradually moved it back and forth with it starting flat and slowly rotating the edge closer until it just caught the little burr.  It came right off but I'm afraid the damage is already done to the fork seal.  I'll see if it is still leaking this weekend and if it isn't, then no problem, if it does then I'll change the seals on that side.  Question; with the VERY small nick that was in there, that is now gone, you can't even feel it, is it even possible that it MIGHT not leak with a new seal in there?  Someone that has had something similar happen will have to answer 'cuz anyone else would only be guessing.  If that fork leg is trashed, can it be reconditioned?  Maybe some of that fancy pants stiction reducing coating stuff?  If not, are the stock units spendy enough to just skip to the top tier forks, Ohlins etc.?  The reason I ask is that I have been rather unpleasantly surprised with the price of stock replacement parts on my other bikes.



  • grayracer513

Posted August 03, 2015 - 04:17 PM

#2

You'll find Ohlins' prices even less pleasant.  If the fork tube can't be rehabilitated, it can be replated by a good suspension shop.  While you have the fork apart, take some wet/dry sandpaper (320-400), damp it with a bit of shop solvent or mineral spirits, and buff over the nicked spot in a cross-hatched pattern.  If you can't catch a fingernail in it, you should be OK.

 

The '03 I had had 2-3 of these little dings in both tubes, and those were rather notorious for not holding a seal very well anyway.  Cleaned up as described, I had no particular problem with them afterward.



  • Wristrockit

Posted August 03, 2015 - 07:13 PM

#3

You'll find Ohlins' prices even less pleasant.  If the fork tube can't be rehabilitated, it can be replated by a good suspension shop.  While you have the fork apart, take some wet/dry sandpaper (320-400), damp it with a bit of shop solvent or mineral spirits, and buff over the nicked spot in a cross-hatched pattern.  If you can't catch a fingernail in it, you should be OK.

 

The '03 I had had 2-3 of these little dings in both tubes, and those were rather notorious for not holding a seal very well anyway.  Cleaned up as described, I had no particular problem with them afterward.

After my hillbilly fix, the knife, I couldn't catch a fingernail on it so I'm hoping that's the end of it, unless, of course, the seal is already completely shot.  No biggie if it is, I'll just do seals this Winter using the wet-dry sandpaper trick.



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  • stk0308

Posted August 05, 2015 - 09:06 AM

#4

You'll find Ohlins' prices even less pleasant.  If the fork tube can't be rehabilitated, it can be replated by a good suspension shop.  While you have the fork apart, take some wet/dry sandpaper (320-400), damp it with a bit of shop solvent or mineral spirits, and buff over the nicked spot in a cross-hatched pattern.  If you can't catch a fingernail in it, you should be OK.

I did very much the same thing to reduce a nick on my '01 YZ426 fork tube.  I used a little bit of suspension fluid, but same deal.  Did a figure 8 kinda motion.  Did not scrub hard to make a low spot in the overall tube, just polish out the raised nick.  New seals in at the same time.  No leaks since.


Edited by stk0308, August 05, 2015 - 09:07 AM.


  • garce250sx

Posted August 07, 2015 - 09:27 AM

#5

I took some of my wife's clear nail polish and put it over a small nick to fill it in and then wet sanded with some 809 grit sand paper from advance auto parts after it dried. Seemed to work pretty good

  • Wristrockit

Posted September 13, 2015 - 04:49 PM

#6

Update; I finally got it fixed! I remembered having some valve lapping compound laying around so after I got it all apart I simply rubbed some around in the area in a figure 8 and circular motion with a shop rag until smooth. It's been sitting in the shop for two days now and hasn't leaked yet. We'll see after next weekend if it's really fixed, I'm going out to the dunes, the mud flats to be specific.





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