Add a neutral light to your WR


18 replies to this topic
  • wizbangdoodle

Posted July 13, 2015 - 08:01 PM

#1

So I've been thinking about adding a neutral light to my bike for quite some time now. I had looked at the schematics and knew it was possible, so I finally got off my butt and did it.

 

The following is my write-up on doing this. My bike is a 2012 WR450, but I think they are all very similar and as long as you have a neutral switch on your bike it can be done.

 

I started by removing the front headlight. I knew I wanted it mounted somewhere around the mph display and was delighted to find this.

 

IMG_20150713_160741794_HDR.jpg

 

IMG_20150713_160753580.jpg

 

That small hole on the right side of the bracket will be perfect for mounting the LED. I then removed the plug connector near it to give me room to cut.

 

IMG_20150713_160957526.jpg

 

I got out my Dremel and made a slice so that I could then bend up the bracket.

 

IMG_20150713_161346560.jpg

 

Here it is bent up into position.

 

IMG_20150713_161555518.jpg

 

I then mounted the LED into the bracket. I got this LED from a local electronics shop. It is a blue 12vdc LED with an 8mm body and will work great for this application.

 

IMG_20150713_163403876.jpg

 

Then added heatshrink to the individual wires

 

IMG_20150713_165544250.jpg

 

and to the whole thing

 

IMG_20150713_165606990.jpg

 

The trick here is to find a 12vdc source that is switched so your light does not stay on even when the bike is off. After poking around a bit, I found a spare plug that was hanging from the double bracket you see in the background.

 

IMG_20150713_181446577_HDR.jpg

 

After measuring, I found that 2 of the 4 pins were switched and gave me 11vdc. I made a quick test to see if there were any problems using this source. Everything worked great and I was able to run a small drill bit through the rubber plug on the connector so that it is sealed.

 

IMG_20150713_182228393.jpg

 

I am fortunate that I work with electrical and electronic equipment every day, so I had a crimp on connector that I could terminate the wire with and fit it within the plug itself. I guess I forgot to take a picture of that before I buttoned it all up, but you get the idea.

 

I then got under the gas tank and found this plug.

 

IMG_20150713_184721792_HDR.jpg

 

As you can see, I have already removed the diode from the plug and removed the spade connector from the body of the connector. I ran my other wire from the LED to this plug and soldered it to the light blue (schematics call it Sky blue). To get this out of the connector, you have to use a very small screwdriver or pick to push the tab down on it to get it out of the connector housing.

 

Once that is all done, redress all your wires to their proper locations and reassemble everything. Here is the finished result.

 

IMG_20150713_170257409.jpg

 

IMG_20150713_190840597.jpg

 

What do you think?

 



  • torkd14

Posted July 13, 2015 - 08:16 PM

#2

I missed the part to how you were able to make the light work while only in neutral.

  • wizbangdoodle

Posted July 13, 2015 - 08:27 PM

#3

I missed the part to how you were able to make the light work while only in neutral.

 

The plug under the gas tank goes to the neutral switch that is mounted on the left side of the engine just beside the shifter shaft. When you put it in neutral, the switch completes the circuit and the light goes on. When you shift into any gear, the switch opens and the light is off.



  • bobpara

Posted July 14, 2015 - 10:28 AM

#4

Why does a bike like this have a neutral switch on the shift lever to begin with?

Is it part of a 'nanny' to make sure that you can only operate the e-start with clutch in and/or in neutral?

I dumped a bike miles from the road once and I believe it was that or the clutch switch that got boogered

Aced by a useless switch

 

I disabled both of mine in the name of reliability



  • wizbangdoodle

Posted July 14, 2015 - 11:29 AM

#5

Yes.

The WR's have a clutch switch and a neutral switch. Disabling them is an option, but I chose to put in a light.

BTW, I've never heard of these switches failing on these bikes. I'm sure they have, but I haven't heard about it.

  • taddow

Posted July 29, 2015 - 03:52 PM

#6

Hey Wizbangdoodle, 

Thanks for posting this. I'm looking to add a neutral light on my '13 WR450F. I know jack squat about wiring so hoping to follow your instructions. I'll most likely be back with questions. 

Thanks again,

-T. Wolf

 

So I've been thinking about adding a neutral light to my bike for quite some time now. I had looked at the schematics and knew it was possible, so I finally got off my butt and did it.

 

The following is my write-up on doing this. My bike is a 2012 WR450, but I think they are all very similar and as long as you have a neutral switch on your bike it can be done.

 

I started by removing the front headlight. I knew I wanted it mounted somewhere around the mph display and was delighted to find this.

 

 

 

That small hole on the right side of the bracket will be perfect for mounting the LED. I then removed the plug connector near it to give me room to cut.

 

 

I got out my Dremel and made a slice so that I could then bend up the bracket.

 

 

 

Here it is bent up into position.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_20150713_161555518.jpg

 

I then mounted the LED into the bracket. I got this LED from a local electronics shop. It is a blue 12vdc LED with an 8mm body and will work great for this application.

 

 

Then added heatshrink to the individual wires

 

 

 

and to the whole thing

 

 

 

The trick here is to find a 12vdc source that is switched so your light does not stay on even when the bike is off. After poking around a bit, I found a spare plug that was hanging from the double bracket you see in the background.

 

 

 

After measuring, I found that 2 of the 4 pins were switched and gave me 11vdc. I made a quick test to see if there were any problems using this source. Everything worked great and I was able to run a small drill bit through the rubber plug on the connector so that it is sealed.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_20150713_182228393.jpg

 

I am fortunate that I work with electrical and electronic equipment every day, so I had a crimp on connector that I could terminate the wire with and fit it within the plug itself. I guess I forgot to take a picture of that before I buttoned it all up, but you get the idea.

 

I then got under the gas tank and found this plug.

 

 

 

As you can see, I have already removed the diode from the plug and removed the spade connector from the body of the connector. I ran my other wire from the LED to this plug and soldered it to the light blue (schematics call it Sky blue). To get this out of the connector, you have to use a very small screwdriver or pick to push the tab down on it to get it out of the connector housing.

 

Once that is all done, redress all your wires to their proper locations and reassemble everything. Here is the finished result.

 

 

What do you think?


Edited by taddow, July 29, 2015 - 03:52 PM.


  • toten

Posted July 31, 2015 - 07:50 AM

#7

Hmm, I might look into doing this to my 03. Might be nice to have a neutral light. 



  • Texas2Smoker

Posted July 31, 2015 - 08:37 AM

#8

This is cool. Thanks for posting it up man.

  • wizbangdoodle

Posted July 31, 2015 - 10:32 AM

#9

I may have to go to a tougher led. My light quit working last week half way through my ride.

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  • taddow

Posted September 23, 2015 - 07:34 AM

#10

Thx Wiz. Nailed it!
ImageUploadedByThumper Talk1443022513.774206.jpg

  • wizbangdoodle

Posted September 23, 2015 - 06:11 PM

#11

Glad you like it.

 

I put a new LED in mine and I'm back in business.



  • WillieV

Posted September 24, 2015 - 03:54 AM

#12

Wizbangdoodle

I dono if its necessary but normally its good practice to put like a 100 ohm resistor in sieries with your led that should keep it going!



  • wizbangdoodle

Posted September 24, 2015 - 06:59 AM

#13

Wizbangdoodle

I dono if its necessary but normally its good practice to put like a 100 ohm resistor in sieries with your led that should keep it going!

 

The led's I used already had a resistor built in, so I don't think another one was necessary. It all depends on what the led is rated for.



  • jimmym

Posted January 29, 2016 - 10:45 AM

#14

I am fortunate that I work with electrical and electronic equipment every day, so I had a crimp on connector that I could terminate the wire with and fit it within the plug itself. I guess I forgot to take a picture of that before I buttoned it all up, but you get the idea.

 

Great post, thanks for the write-up! 

 

I'm attempting to do the same thing, but can't figure out which wiring connector to use that will terminate and fit into the plug. Would anyone be willing to share a close-up picture or part number?



  • wizbangdoodle

Posted January 29, 2016 - 01:43 PM

#15

Great post, thanks for the write-up!

I'm attempting to do the same thing, but can't figure out which wiring connector to use that will terminate and fit into the plug. Would anyone be willing to share a close-up picture or part number?


Not sure exactly what you are asking, but I'll try to help. Are you asking about the wiring behind the light or under the tank?

  • jimmym

Posted January 29, 2016 - 02:12 PM

#16

I'm asking about the connections behind the light. I unplugged the connector, and am trying to understand how you terminated the connection so I can plug in and complete the circuit.

  • wizbangdoodle

Posted January 29, 2016 - 05:29 PM

#17

I had some crimp pins that I used. I'll see if I can get the manufacturer name and source for you.

  • jimmym

Posted February 07, 2016 - 08:22 PM

#18

I had some crimp pins that I used. I'll see if I can get the manufacturer name and source for you.

 

Looking at parts on the following site, does the female flat pin with part # 12-0121 look like the correct part for the connector in the attached image?

http://www.partsnmor...roduct-12-0121\

 

IMG_20160129_104502.jpg


  • wizbangdoodle

Posted February 07, 2016 - 08:36 PM

#19

Looking at parts on the following site, does the female flat pin with part # 12-0121 look like the correct part for the connector in the attached image?
http://www.partsnmor...product-12-0121

attachicon.gifIMG_20160129_104502.jpg


Yes, 12-0120 and 12-121 are the male and female pins for that connector.




 
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