BIG BRAKE KITS!



62 replies to this topic
  • yzUSMCf

Posted July 29, 2015 - 09:19 PM

#41

Alright so I've ridden with my oversized tusk rotor and sintered pads for about 3 hours now. And I like it!! Good quality and noticeable improvement in stopping power . the lever is still a squishy so I think a ss brake line will really complement the rotor . quality is top notch big bang for my buck!

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  • jcm3

Posted July 30, 2015 - 07:17 AM

#42

Hey Chad,

Just curious, how did you bleed it?  I'm using a little handheld vacuum bleeder, and also flushed the brake fluid at the same time by pulling it out of the reservoir first and then sucking it through while refilling it a few times.  I am not sure how that compares with the old brake lever method, but curious how you did it.

 

I'm hoping to try mine out at Pala next Saturday.  I decided to go with the Galfer non-floating setup, and it felt great in my little test ride around the block.  Can't wait to try it out.  I still have the stock line also.



  • yzUSMCf

Posted July 30, 2015 - 09:07 AM

#43

I didn't need to bleed my line I have never cracked the line. But when I do I will just do the old fashioned method of pumping and cracking the bleeder with the cap off and keeping the reservoir filled.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 30, 2015 - 09:41 AM

#44

Gravity bleeding works better than the mini vac does.  Sometimes a little tricky to get it flowing, but much more effective.  The pump, bleed, and release method just lets the bubble crawl back up the line between pumps.

 

Where most people end up in trouble is that the banjo fitting will capture a bubble and let the fluid flow under and around it.  Once you have a good clear flow at the bleeder, close it off.  Then, look in the master and depress the lever through only the first 3-4 mm of travel to "burp" the last bubble and you should be OK.  You could loosen the banjo slightly and push the air out at that point, but it usually isn't needed.



  • jcm3

Posted July 30, 2015 - 10:34 AM

#45

Gravity bleeding works better than the mini vac does.  Sometimes a little tricky to get it flowing, but much more effective.  The pump, bleed, and release method just lets the bubble crawl back up the line between pumps.

 

Where most people end up in trouble is that the banjo fitting will capture a bubble and let the fluid flow under and around it.  Once you have a good clear flow at the bleeder, close it off.  Then, look in the master and depress the lever through only the first 3-4 mm of travel to "burp" the last bubble and you should be OK.  You could loosen the banjo slightly and push the air out at that point, but it usually isn't needed.

 

I've done some searches (both on here and via Google) but am not finding a good how to for gravity feeding for mx bikes.  Do you have a link, or mind posting up a little bit on the process?

 

Is it like a car, just open up the nipple a tad and let it flow for a while?



  • grayracer513

Posted July 30, 2015 - 01:19 PM

#46

That's pretty much it, yes.  Obviously, you need to keep fluid in the master the whole time it's running out in order to avoid adding air at the top, and as I said, it can be a bit troublesome to get the flow going in the first place, but once it starts, you win.

 

I usually use the conventional pump and bleed thing to get hings rolling.  You know the drill: squeeze & hold, open, close, release, repeat.  After 3-4 of those, open the bleeder a good ways and wiggle the lever through the first 3-4 mm and watch for fluid to start running out.  Have your fluid at the ready.

 

Then as I said already, once you see no more air, close it, tickle the bubble out of the banjo, and top it off.



  • jcm3

Posted July 31, 2015 - 08:19 AM

#47

Never done it that way, thanks.  I'll try it.



  • rojapar

Posted August 04, 2015 - 06:22 AM

#48

I did the EBC big brake kit and rode it for the first time last night.  The brakes still aren't very good.  I'm not even so sure its a big improvement over stock.



  • Monk

Posted August 04, 2015 - 06:50 AM

#49

I did the EBC big brake kit and rode it for the first time last night. The brakes still aren't very good. I'm not even so sure its a big improvement over stock.


Pads need to be set into rotor...

  • rojapar

Posted August 04, 2015 - 06:54 AM

#50

Pads need to be set into rotor...

like...broke in with a little use?



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  • Monk

Posted August 04, 2015 - 09:12 AM

#51

like...broke in with a little use?


Maybe do a little research about breaking in pads and rotors before posting that you think they don't work...

Your experience at this point doesn't help anyone or yourself...

  • rojapar

Posted August 04, 2015 - 09:41 AM

#52

Maybe do a little research about breaking in pads and rotors before posting that you think they don't work...

Your experience at this point doesn't help anyone or yourself...

I compared riding around on a new bike off the showroom floor to a new big brake kit installed...the same amount of time on each.  I made a direct comparison between two brake systems with the same amount of time on each.  Like I said, I could tell very little, if any difference in stopping power.  If that isn't a relative comparison, then please excuse my two cents kind sir.



  • slotracer577

Posted August 04, 2015 - 10:02 AM

#53

Might be the pads. If you switched to organic pads from sintered, the braking may be no different. Hh rated sintered pads on a big rotor should be better.
Stock rotor with stock pads with dirt track wheels on pavement from 110+ was scary, lever to the bar and not stopping. Oversized rotor was still 4 fingers but stopped, 310mm was 2 fingers.

  • Dexter42

Posted August 04, 2015 - 10:17 AM

#54

Looks like you figured it out op. I guess I got lucky with my tusk and stock pads cause if you grab just a little to much it will put you on your back real quick haha.. I like the slight soft feel of the brake lever witch I use almost as a safe zone when pulling in the brakes before it really starts to bite, almost like play on the throttle. You know what you can get away with before you grab a hand full!

  • jcm3

Posted August 04, 2015 - 12:42 PM

#55

I compared riding around on a new bike off the showroom floor to a new big brake kit installed...the same amount of time on each.  I made a direct comparison between two brake systems with the same amount of time on each.  Like I said, I could tell very little, if any difference in stopping power.  If that isn't a relative comparison, then please excuse my two cents kind sir.

 

Really?  I'm surprised.

 

I did an EBC oversized rotor on my KX500 along with a Ride Engineering CR-style line and race sintered pads.  The braking felt better than a new bike, although it probably wasn't.

 

Just did a Galfer solid 270mm oversized rotor on my 2014, but haven't taken it to the track yet. Hopefully Saturday.  It took a few minutes around the block and a few stops with some cooling in between, and it felt better than stock.  I had stock pads in it at the time, but have some Galfer sintered pads that just came in.

 

I need to track test it, but would be surprised if it didn't feel better.  What is the issue?  Is it spongy, or feels solid but just doesn't stop?



  • rojapar

Posted August 04, 2015 - 12:56 PM

#56

Really?  I'm surprised.

 

I did an EBC oversized rotor on my KX500 along with a Ride Engineering CR-style line and race sintered pads.  The braking felt better than a new bike, although it probably wasn't.

 

Just did a Galfer solid 270mm oversized rotor on my 2014, but haven't taken it to the track yet. Hopefully Saturday.  It took a few minutes around the block and a few stops with some cooling in between, and it felt better than stock.  I had stock pads in it at the time, but have some Galfer sintered pads that just came in.

 

I need to track test it, but would be surprised if it didn't feel better.  What is the issue?  Is it spongy, or feels solid but just doesn't stop?

Its solid feeling as I put some stainless lines on it.  I just used the stock pads.  Probably some new pads would help out.  It just didn't have the KTM bite I was hoping for..  I'm going to degrease the rotor and pads before my ride this weekend to make sure I didn't get any oil on them and then re-evaluate.  I'll post back up my thoughts next week if interested.



  • jcm3

Posted August 04, 2015 - 01:00 PM

#57

Its solid feeling as I put some stainless lines on it.  I just used the stock pads.  Probably some new pads would help out.  It just didn't have the KTM bite I was hoping for..  I'm going to degrease the rotor and pads before my ride this weekend to make sure I didn't get any oil on them and then re-evaluate.  I'll post back up my thoughts next week if interested.

 

I'd be interested.

 

I'm going to try mine out this weekend at Pala and see how it feels.  I still have the stock brake line, so it will be just an oversized rotor, new pads front and rear, and new brake fluid.  I may try the line if I don't like the feel, but I'm an older weekend guy so I'm sure the bottleneck will be me and not the bike.  :lol:



  • slotracer577

Posted August 04, 2015 - 01:41 PM

#58

Its solid feeling as I put some stainless lines on it. I just used the stock pads. Probably some new pads would help out. It just didn't have the KTM bite I was hoping for.. I'm going to degrease the rotor and pads before my ride this weekend to make sure I didn't get any oil on them and then re-evaluate. I'll post back up my thoughts next week if interested.


Most brake cleaners leave a residue and may glass the pads/rotor. To really clean the rotors back to new sand blast them.

  • grayracer513

Posted August 05, 2015 - 06:44 AM

#59

 I just used the stock pads. 

 

This is probably where your trouble lies.  OEM rotors are stainless, while most aftermarket OS kits are carbon steel.  CS produces more braking friction, but the composition of the pads needs to be different to match up. 

 

Apart from that, you have brake pads that have been heated, glazed over, and worn to match a surface that they no longer run on.  If you reuse a set of pads on a replacement rotor of whatever kind, you should sand the pads on a piece of 180 grit laid on a flat plate or a sheet of glass to restore then to a new, flat, raw surface so they will "break in" to the new rotor.



  • rojapar

Posted August 05, 2015 - 08:29 AM

#60

This is probably where your trouble lies.  OEM rotors are stainless, while most aftermarket OS kits are carbon steel.  CS produces more braking friction, but the composition of the pads needs to be different to match up. 

 

Apart from that, you have brake pads that have been heated, glazed over, and worn to match a surface that they no longer run on.  If you reuse a set of pads on a replacement rotor of whatever kind, you should sand the pads on a piece of 180 grit laid on a flat plate or a sheet of glass to restore then to a new, flat, raw surface so they will "break in" to the new rotor.

That makes sense.  I'll have to get some new pads ordered.  What do you recommend with my set up?

 

As far as the pads surface being worn to the old rotor, you could not tell visually.  I didn't ride it long enough with the stock rotor to case any visible wear.  I'm sure scuffing them on some sand paper would have been a good idea, but  didn't think about that at the time.  As for as them being glazed over, I am not sure.  They look basically new, so I am not sure. 

 

PS Slotracer, taking the rotor off and sandblasting it is not an option since it I brand new.  After all that work, I may touch it with an oily hand installing it and be back to square one.  Also, I had no idea brake cleaner would glass the rotor.







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