my new (to m) 2002 YZ426F


13 replies to this topic
  • Holgrinator

Posted June 25, 2015 - 09:39 AM

#1

Hey all, my name is Jason and I just picked up a YZ426f.  It's my first bike in about 10 years.  My last bike was an 86 yz250 and I've been riding a Raptor 660 and then a 700 for the last 3 years.  I joined for those times I'll need some good info on how to work on or fix items on the bike.

Attached Thumbnails

  • my bike 1.png
  • my bike.png
  • bike and raptor.png


  • Yz400Flyer

Posted June 27, 2015 - 06:18 AM

#2

Looks clean and not that used either I would say (judging by the rather small amount of paint rubbed off on the frame for that age of bike).

Did you take this picture on the mountain range just east of Salt Lake/Ogden? Isn't that the Wasatch?

  • cadesdad

Posted June 28, 2015 - 11:00 AM

#3

Yeah, it looks like it's above Bountiful.

  • cadesdad

Posted June 28, 2015 - 11:02 AM

#4

Bike does look nice too! I had a 01 426, loved that bike!

  • harmetp

Posted June 30, 2015 - 03:33 AM

#5

I'm in about the same boat, but 20 years ago I did road racing as a hobby (you know those 'ninja bikes') so I'm about lost when it comes to the dynamics of a dirt bike.  So the natural choice is to shop price and buy a bike way too powerful for me - a yz426 (mines an 01).  You are likely a much better rider than me, but that won't stop me from stating the obvious.  (people call me captain obvious because I say obvious things...)

 

Here is my list so far:

 

1. if the 2002 doesn't have the autodecompression cam, it needs one.  Makes starts much much much easier especially after you get tired (well I get tired pretty easy).  The hotcam exhaust cam changed the power delivery a little, but I'm not wringing it out much so it's not super noticeable.  In other words it doesn't make a high rpm, narrow power band bike any more than it was. 

 

2. I need to work on suspension setup.  the street based bikes we raced were quite good all stock and only needed minor modification or adjustment (the idiot riding it is what needed modification most of the time).  The YZ seems to have nice components and even set up for the wrong guy still goes over jumps like they are not there.  Going into turns has been a different story for me and I'll be looking at setting some of the basics right next time we go riding.

 

3. It's not a WR so first gear is tall.  I've been thinking about sprocket changes, but I did come across a cheap rekluse clutch that I plan to install.  It's an old guy thing for me, but I've been staying off tight trails because I assumed I'd be stalling it at every tight turn. The rekluse should make it like my first go cart with the centrificle clutch.  

 

4. Again, it's not a WR, it's a motorcross racing bike, so no nice ratio gear box, no electric start.  However, I think the YZ is a little lighter, tuned for a bit more fun (maybe too much at times) and most importantly seems to be half the price of a wr426.

 

Kirk out  



  • grayracer513

Posted June 30, 2015 - 07:09 AM

#6


1. if the 2002 doesn't have the autodecompression cam, it needs one.  Makes starts much much much easier especially after you get tired (well I get tired pretty easy).  The hotcam exhaust cam changed the power delivery a little, but I'm not wringing it out much so it's not super noticeable.  In other words it doesn't make a high rpm, narrow power band bike any more than it was. 

 

3. It's not a WR so first gear is tall.  I've been thinking about sprocket changes, but I did come across a cheap rekluse clutch that I plan to install.  It's an old guy thing for me, but I've been staying off tight trails because I assumed I'd be stalling it at every tight turn. The rekluse should make it like my first go cart with the centrificle clutch.  

 

If the correct procedure is followed with manual decompression, it's not really any harder to start than auto decompression, but it is more complicated.  AD just takes away all the time and guesswork of pre-positioning the crank for a shortened compression stroke.  It also lets you bump start it like it was a 250.

 

If you install the Rekluse and get it working as it should, you won't need to lower your gearing for trail riding.  The clutch will take care of it.  It's like having a torque converter, once you get used to it.  Forget clutch control, refine your throttle control, you won't believe the difference.

 

Which Rekluse model?



  • harmetp

Posted June 30, 2015 - 07:19 AM

#7

Everyone says that about using the decompression lever right and I did it for a while, but it's not a small motor and generally needs technique that I find leaves me as a wear out during the day.  Perhaps it's just a 54 year old perspective. I don't want to pay more for an electric start, but I like easy when it comes to starting.  Besides the cam is super easy to drop in.  The only thing I've noticed is that I have a little more ticking from the head so I'll have to recheck valve clearance again (and get a spacer kit and drop the one I want in the grass somehow.....).  

 

I agree completely on the rekluse eliminating the need for different gearing.  While I'm figuring things out it's nice to have that tall 1st gear so I don't shift going around a tight track (old road racing thing - keep the variables to a minimum at first).  Since it was used I can't be sure of the exact kit but it appears to be the z-start since it has the steel balls.  Looks like the exp would be the easiest, but I bought this for $75 so I'm going to try it out.  



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  • grayracer513

Posted June 30, 2015 - 09:24 AM

#8

Hopefully, it is the Z-Start Pro, and not the older Z-Start.  Do you have the documentation for it?

 

http://www.rekluse.c...t_Pro_cable.pdf

 

http://www.rekluse.c...z-Start_Pro.pdf

 

As a starting point, I set mine up "Mid/Soft", or middle range engagement point and "soft" engagement rate.   That will make sense once you read the manual and tuning guide. 

 

On the AD cam, I'm not saying not to.  It remains one of the best mods to do to the old bikes.  Just that the "old way" is really pretty easy if you do it the right way.  Just takes more time and detail.



  • Holgrinator

Posted July 08, 2015 - 10:32 AM

#9

Yeah, it looks like it's above Bountiful.

Yep, that's right above Bountiful.  We rode up Bountiful and over to the radar domes and back.  Did a little exploring by the bountiful peak campground while we were up there.  There was still a big snow bank by the radar domes that kept us from going further north.



  • Holgrinator

Posted July 08, 2015 - 10:41 AM

#10

I'm in about the same boat, but 20 years ago I did road racing as a hobby (you know those 'ninja bikes') so I'm about lost when it comes to the dynamics of a dirt bike.  So the natural choice is to shop price and buy a bike way too powerful for me - a yz426 (mines an 01).  You are likely a much better rider than me, but that won't stop me from stating the obvious.  (people call me captain obvious because I say obvious things...)

 

Here is my list so far:

 

1. if the 2002 doesn't have the autodecompression cam, it needs one.  Makes starts much much much easier especially after you get tired (well I get tired pretty easy).  The hotcam exhaust cam changed the power delivery a little, but I'm not wringing it out much so it's not super noticeable.  In other words it doesn't make a high rpm, narrow power band bike any more than it was. 

 

2. I need to work on suspension setup.  the street based bikes we raced were quite good all stock and only needed minor modification or adjustment (the idiot riding it is what needed modification most of the time).  The YZ seems to have nice components and even set up for the wrong guy still goes over jumps like they are not there.  Going into turns has been a different story for me and I'll be looking at setting some of the basics right next time we go riding.

 

3. It's not a WR so first gear is tall.  I've been thinking about sprocket changes, but I did come across a cheap rekluse clutch that I plan to install.  It's an old guy thing for me, but I've been staying off tight trails because I assumed I'd be stalling it at every tight turn. The rekluse should make it like my first go cart with the centrificle clutch.  

 

4. Again, it's not a WR, it's a motorcross racing bike, so no nice ratio gear box, no electric start.  However, I think the YZ is a little lighter, tuned for a bit more fun (maybe too much at times) and most importantly seems to be half the price of a wr426.

 

Kirk out  

 

It does not have an auto decomp cam and it doesn't bother me the least bit.  Only one time have I ever had to kick it more than once to start it.  It did take a little time to learn the bikes personality and what it prefers for the starting procedure.  Cold: turn on the choke, find the sweet spot, pull the lever, kick 1 inch, let the lever out, let the kickstart to the top, and give her a swift kick.  Hot is the exact same only no choke needed.  No twist of the throttle needed either hot or cold.  Seems complicated but once you know what your bike likes it's not really any slower or more difficult than an auto decomp bike.  I geared it down by going up 2 teeth on the rear sprocket and it's been great even on rocky tight trails. 

 

I'm a big guy at 340lbs so I already had a custom Race Tech suspension (springs and valves) installed. Night and day difference.

 

So far I'm super happy.  I actually enjoy kicking it over so I don't really miss the electric start on the raptor... Something manly about kicking a bike. 


Edited by Holgrinator, July 08, 2015 - 10:42 AM.


  • 03yzf450-kuke

Posted July 10, 2015 - 02:50 PM

#11

It is definately slower since with AD u just jump on your bike and kick

  • Holgrinator

Posted July 15, 2015 - 10:36 AM

#12

It is definately slower since with AD u just jump on your bike and kick

I'm Sure you're right.  But I don't race so the extra 10-20 seconds to start it really doesn't matter.  I'm not in any contest to start my bike faster than anyone else.  As long as it only takes 1 or 2 kicks I'm happy.



  • cadesdad

Posted July 15, 2015 - 11:41 AM

#13

I agree, I learned how to start a difficult four stroke back with my 83 xr500. I always wanted to switch cams in my 98 yz400f and 01 426, but it wasn't worth the expense to me when I had no problems with the starting drill. There are some people, that no matter what, just can't figure it out. I know I tried to teach a few different guys how to do it, but they just kept breaking kickstarters. Those are the guys that really need AD cams.

  • grayracer513

Posted July 15, 2015 - 04:08 PM

#14

A lot of guys never do figure it out.  Part of the problem is the popular tendency to confuse the "hard spot", which is the start of the compression stroke, with TDC (top dead center), when the two are quite different locations within the engine operating cycle.  120 degrees apart, they are.   That, and some of the old guys who once rode British thumpers, which had a similar, but different drill in important ways.







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