2014 YZ450F Cooling fan?


22 replies to this topic
  • yamie

Posted June 10, 2015 - 09:59 PM

#1

Hey guys, I searched and read a lot of topics but couldn't find anything. I am trying to find a cooling fan to add  to my 2014 YZ450F as I do a lot of trail ridding with my kids and the bike gets hot. Does anyone know where I can get an easy set up to mount one and wire it in? The closest I could find is

 

http://www.ebay.com/...6a3b254&vxp=mtr

 

but this doesn't fit the YZ450F. Something along this design, but instead of a thermostat having an on/off switch would be ideal.

 

Just seeing if anyone knows something out there. Thanks



  • Gunner354

Posted June 11, 2015 - 04:38 AM

#2

Hey guys, I searched and read a lot of topics but couldn't find anything. I am trying to find a cooling fan to add to my 2014 YZ450F as I do a lot of trail ridding with my kids and the bike gets hot. Does anyone know where I can get an easy set up to mount one and wire it in? The closest I could find is
Just install Evans coolant and forget about it.
http://www.ebay.com/...6a3b254&vxp=mtr

but this doesn't fit the YZ450F. Something along this design, but instead of a thermostat having an on/off switch would be ideal.

Just seeing if anyone knows something out there. Thanks



  • grayracer513

Posted June 11, 2015 - 06:26 AM

#3

No one makes a kit for the particular bike, but small DC computer chassis fans and the like can be adapted tot he purpose fairly easily.  You can run them from the red power lead on the system side of the rectifier on the EFI bikes.  You can connect them with a switch and manage it manually.



  • GHILL28

Posted June 11, 2015 - 07:27 AM

#4

Done some longer slow trail rides with Engine Ice and a high pressure radiator cap on my '14 and haven't heard it burble once yet.  But that's not really what I have this bike for primarily.



  • yamie

Posted June 11, 2015 - 11:16 PM

#5

I tried almost every coolant out there, and water wetter, almost everything. My 2014 dont' boil over like my 08 did (that think was puking on the track as well). But it gets really hot, hard to start. Would just be nice to mount a fan to help keep it a little cooler when I'm riding with my kids (who are only 5 and 6).

I will look into a PC fan and see what I can come up with.

 

Wouldn't happen to have a picture of where I would tie it into would you gray?



  • grayracer513

Posted June 12, 2015 - 07:49 AM

#6

The neatest thing I've seen is a guy who took the louvers off and cut out the radiator side of them to clear the fan, then mounted the fan to the louvers and back on.  You can also simply zip-tie the fan directly to the radiator on the backside, but you need to use some foam tape or something to keep the fan from chafing the radiator.

 

I don't have a picture, but if you look in your manual, you will see that there is a red lead that runs out from the rectifier and branches to provide power to a number of components around the bike.  You can pick up fan power from any of them.



  • n16ht5

Posted June 12, 2015 - 08:30 AM

#7

High pressure rad cap was all I needed to keep from boiling FYI



  • WouldsAssassin

Posted June 13, 2015 - 10:53 AM

#8

I installed a PC fan to my 2011. To mount the fan I used some sheet metal pieces from my local Ace Hardware that I attached to my radiator guards. My custom kit used a surface mount thermostat but I would've preferred the cut and splice radiator hose style from a KTM kit. I couldn't find one when I needed it so made do with what was available.

If I can find a photo I'll post it for you.

  • yamie

Posted February 23, 2016 - 11:29 AM

#9

So trail tech has the following kit

 

http://www.trailtech...fankit/732-fna1

 

I emailed them and they responded saying that it won't work on my bike because it draws too much power and as soon as the fan kicks on it will shut of the bike because there won't be any power to run the fuel pump, etc...

 

specs say a draw of 3 amps and 30 watts. 

 

Anyone know how much power the stock stator will have once the bike is running?



  • grayracer513

Posted February 23, 2016 - 11:42 AM

#10

Monk is running a 40 watt light on his.  Frankly, 3 amps for a fan seems a little silly.  You can find all sorts of 12V DC fans on the market that draw half an amp or so (6w at 12v). 



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  • Monk

Posted February 23, 2016 - 11:49 AM

#11

So trail tech has the following kit

http://www.trailtech...fankit/732-fna1

I emailed them and they responded saying that it won't work on my bike because it draws too much power and as soon as the fan kicks on it will shut of the bike because there won't be any power to run the fuel pump, etc...

specs say a draw of 3 amps and 30 watts.

Anyone know how much power the stock stator will have once the bike is running?


Edit

Edited by Monk, February 23, 2016 - 11:50 AM.


  • Monk

Posted February 23, 2016 - 11:53 AM

#12

The problem won't be when the fan is running, it's getting it running that takes the watts. You could replace the stock capacitor with a small battery that would slowly discharge over the ride...

  • yamie

Posted February 23, 2016 - 12:03 PM

#13

The problem won't be when the fan is running, it's getting it running that takes the watts. You could replace the stock capacitor with a small battery that would slowly discharge over the ride...

 

Ok I see..  I think this would be a little over my head, so maybe I'll just keep her original lol. My next bike will be a full trail bike, electric start and fan haha.



  • NW Briff

Posted March 08, 2016 - 07:42 PM

#14

The problem won't be when the fan is running, it's getting it running that takes the watts. You could replace the stock capacitor with a small battery that would slowly discharge over the ride...

I am not super familiar with capicitors but Do you think it would be possible to add your own capacitor inline with the fan wiring to make it work? Or upgrade the factory one?

Ive often thought about this id like to put a 30 or 40w HID on the front of my bike.

Edited by NW Briff, March 08, 2016 - 07:51 PM.


  • Monk

Posted March 08, 2016 - 07:47 PM

#15

I am not too familiar with capicitors but Do you think it would be possible to add your own capacitor inline with the fan wiring to make it work? Or upgrade the factory one?

Ive often thought about this id like to put a 30 or 40w HID on the front of my bike.

No issues running a 40w light on the bike. I would look at LED as a better option... The big issue with the fan would be the initial startup draw. Could be 70w to start up and only 40w to run...

Edited by Monk, March 08, 2016 - 07:47 PM.


  • NW Briff

Posted March 08, 2016 - 07:54 PM

#16

No issues running a 40w light on the bike. I would look at LED as a better option... The big issue with the fan would be the initial startup draw. Could be 70w to start up and only 40w to run...


Are you running an HID bulb with a ballast? I was told that it takes extra power draw to fire the bulb off.

  • Monk

Posted March 08, 2016 - 08:01 PM

#17

Are you running an HID bulb with a ballast? I was told that it takes extra power draw to fire the bulb off.


I have 2 setups. Both LED. One is a LED bulb in a stock WR headlight mask. 3600 lumen, more then enough to get you out of the bush at a decent rate. Draws about 30w...

20160220_095442_zpsxnrffx3j.jpg
https://youtu.be/-e2v9BfmvxE

The other lighting setup I run is pure race. Baja Designs Squadron Dual XL Pro... Pure overkill! 4800 lumen per light. One runs off the bike at a 40w draw, the other runs off a large LiPo battery I have mounted on the airbox...
20160220_100630_zpsxpvnqbgp.jpg
https://youtu.be/koySHZue5Bs

  • NW Briff

Posted March 08, 2016 - 08:55 PM

#18

Leds would definately be more reliable. Nice lights.

Edited the rest out to keep the thread on topic

Edited by NW Briff, March 08, 2016 - 09:36 PM.


  • grayracer513

Posted March 09, 2016 - 07:39 AM

#19

HID's do require high startup current.  A 35w HID that draws just under 3 amps in use may take 10 or 12 to ignite.  You would definitely have to switch it off to start the bike absent a battery.

 

LED's have become the best choice with the recent advances in output. 



  • NW Briff

Posted March 09, 2016 - 06:59 PM

#20

HID's do require high startup current. A 35w HID that draws just under 3 amps in use may take 10 or 12 to ignite. You would definitely have to switch it off to start the bike absent a battery.

LED's have become the best choice with the recent advances in output.


So you dont think that would be enough draw to kill the bike while running?

I wouldnt mind having an on off switch to deal with. My origional thoughts were to try and get as much light as possible out of an h4. Either use a wr light or a round desert racing style light.

Reasons would be the benefit of high and low beam as well as attracting less attention from the police and forest rangers.
My bike is plated and i ride it after work on the street when its nice. (Adrenaline therapy is great for stress relief.) I really like monks race setup and would probly choose a single one of those if thought i could get away with it on the street and performance matched hid.

Edited by NW Briff, March 09, 2016 - 07:20 PM.






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