Help me optimize my 450's suspension for woods...


9 replies to this topic
  • rojapar

Posted January 18, 2015 - 06:24 PM

#1

I don't have the money to have my suspension professionally set up for woods riding, but what adjustments can I make at home to help it the most.

 

The front forks, is there only two adjustments I can make...the rebound and compression? 

 

And on the rear shock...there is high speed compression, low speed compression, and rebound, correct?

 

What are some good starting points for adjustments for woods type riding?

 

Also, I was looking at some Motion Pro speed bleeders for the front forks.  These look handy, but how often are you supposed to let air out of your forks.  One other thing, is the air valve at the bottom of the shock reservoir for bleeding out air also?

 

Thanks



  • grayracer513

Posted January 18, 2015 - 09:00 PM

#2

Year?



  • rojapar

Posted January 19, 2015 - 11:27 AM

#3

Year?

its a 2014.  im a little unsure how to use the adjusters.  do you screw them all the way in and then count the rotations of how many times you screw them out?  if you unscrew them to far, will they fall out, or hit a stopping point.

 

also, on further inspection last night, the adjustments on the top of my forks are not lined up nor are the symmetrical to each other.  it looks like that just mounted the forks in the triples wherever they pleased.

 

is it ok to line the tops of the forks up and then twist the bottom axle holding part of the fork back strait to line up the axle?



  • grayracer513

Posted January 19, 2015 - 05:16 PM

#4

Your last question first, yes.  The best functional position is when the bleeders are at 12:00 o'clock.  They spit less that way.  Otherwise they can go anyplace.

 

I have a set of the MP bleeders, they work OK.  You should relieve the air pressure after each day's use.  With some oils, more often.  Only with the bike on the stand though.

 

The adjusters will not fall out.  Except for the HS shock adjustment, they "click" (they have spring loaded indexing).  The proper procedure is to run them all the way in, then count the clicks out.  Count as you turn in, and you'll know where you started. 

 

For woods, which usually means to me, "lower speeds and trails littered with big obstacles" like rocks, roots, etc., the main difference in setup is that the compression needs to be backed off, especially the high speed.  Set the rebound in about the middle of the range (10-12 out, roughly), and fiddle with it 'til you like it.  Run the fork compression out to around 18-20 on the fork, and about 15 on the shock low speed (the screw).  The high speed adjuster (the 17mm blue nut) doesn't click.  Start with it backed all the way out. 

 

This will give you the most compliant setup you can run without modifying the valving.  If you have bottoming issues, you can tighten the comp up a bit more.  Not really ideal, but it's somewhere to start.



  • rojapar

Posted January 19, 2015 - 06:05 PM

#5

Your last question first, yes.  The best functional position is when the bleeders are at 12:00 o'clock.  They spit less that way.  Otherwise they can go anyplace.

 

I have a set of the MP bleeders, they work OK.  You should relieve the air pressure after each day's use.  With some oils, more often.  Only with the bike on the stand though.

 

The adjusters will not fall out.  Except for the HS shock adjustment, they "click" (they have spring loaded indexing).  The proper procedure is to run them all the way in, then count the clicks out.  Count as you turn in, and you'll know where you started. 

 

For woods, which usually means to me, "lower speeds and trails littered with big obstacles" like rocks, roots, etc., the main difference in setup is that the compression needs to be backed off, especially the high speed.  Set the rebound in about the middle of the range (10-12 out, roughly), and fiddle with it 'til you like it.  Run the fork compression out to around 18-20 on the fork, and about 15 on the shock low speed (the screw).  The high speed adjuster (the 17mm blue nut) doesn't click.  Start with it backed all the way out. 

 

This will give you the most compliant setup you can run without modifying the valving.  If you have bottoming issues, you can tighten the comp up a bit more.  Not really ideal, but it's somewhere to start

edit...

 

ok forks:

rebound is 8 clicks out standard.  20 clicks out in minimum

compression 9 clicks out is standard. 20 clicks out is minimum

 

shock:

rebound is 14 clicks out standard. 30 clicks out is minumum

HS compression nut is 1 1/2 turns out standard. 2 turns out is minimum

LS compression is 12 clicks out standard. 30 clicks out is minimum


Edited by rojapar, January 19, 2015 - 06:26 PM.


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  • rojapar

Posted January 19, 2015 - 06:32 PM

#6

so, the starting points would roughly be:

 

forks:

rebound 12 clicks out

compression 20 clicks out (this in the very minimum compression)

 

shock:

rebound (what do i set the shock rebound to?)

HS compression 2 turns out (this is minimum high speed compression)

LS compression 15 clicks out

 

*what did you suggest for the shock rebound?



  • drtrcr400

Posted January 19, 2015 - 06:36 PM

#7

If you haven't already done it, make sure you set your sag first. Most of us on here with the same bike like 105-110mm. Some swear by even higher numbers.
Edit: I just noticed your last question about the air valve on the shock. It is NOT for bleeding air during normal maintenance like the bleeders on your forks. It's used to charge the shock with nitrogen.

Edited by drtrcr400, January 19, 2015 - 06:45 PM.


  • rojapar

Posted January 19, 2015 - 06:49 PM

#8

If you haven't already done it, make sure you set your sag first. Most of us on here with the same bike like 105-110mm. Some swear by even higher numbers.
Edit: I just noticed your last question about the air valve on the shock. It is NOT for bleeding air during normal maintenance like the bleeders on your forks. It's used to charge the shock with nitrogen.

im kind of afraid to touch the preload collar after seeing the guy stip his out the first day trying to turn it.  im prob about 250 lbs so im hoping it will actually be set a little on the soft side for me with the factory settings.

 

and thank you about the shock tip!  i was going to "let some air" out of the shock when i got home tonight.



  • drtrcr400

Posted January 19, 2015 - 06:59 PM

#9

Don't be afraid to adjust your sag. Use a penetrating lube, knock loose the lock collar and turn the spring by hand with the back wheel off the ground. It's virtually impossible to do any damage that way.
All that being said, at your weight you REALLY need springs. It's counter intuitive at first but stiffer springs will actually make the bike ride softer as you won't be so low in the stroke.

  • grayracer513

Posted January 19, 2015 - 09:11 PM

#10

All that being said, at your weight you REALLY need springs.

 

Really.  Until you get them, you have no chance of making the suspension work right.







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