How do you remove bladder from 2012 WR450F shock, no schrader valve


29 replies to this topic
  • mch

Posted January 03, 2015 - 08:58 AM

#21

I recommend you get a 14mm Cone Wrench for taking apart the internals inside the twin chamber.  It's much easier than trying to squeeze a fat wrench between the little spring.  Maybe the auto part stores have it, I forgot what they call them there (basically a skinny wrench).  The bicycle shops should have the cone wrench... guess cone is part of a bicycle.  I got one from Park Tools that is real nice.

 

I have a Nitrogen tank setup I built for around $300.  It's convenient, but kind of a luxury item.

 

http://s222.photobuc...ogen Tool/story


Edited by mch, January 03, 2015 - 08:58 AM.


  • woods-rider

Posted January 03, 2015 - 09:03 AM

#22

I recommend you get a 14mm Cone Wrench for taking apart the internals inside the twin chamber.  It's much easier than trying to squeeze a fat wrench between the little spring.  Maybe the auto part stores have it, I forgot what they call them there (basically a skinny wrench).  The bicycle shops should have the cone wrench... guess cone is part of a bicycle.  I got one from Park Tools that is real nice.

 

I have a Nitrogen tank setup I built for around $300.  It's convenient, but kind of a luxury item.

 

http://s222.photobuc...ogen Tool/story

 

Nice Nitrogen set up. It would be nice to have my own setup, but for something I will only use once every other year or so, I can't justify the price tag.

 

As far as tools for the forks go, here's what I have on order from RMATV that should be here any day now. I also have all the standard type tools a regular guy should have and then some. I already have the fork seal driver.

 

tus_08_kyb_dua_cha_for_cap_wre.jpg

https://www.rockymou...=tusk fork tool


Edited by woods-rider, January 03, 2015 - 09:04 AM.


  • mch

Posted January 03, 2015 - 03:00 PM

#23

Nice Nitrogen set up. It would be nice to have my own setup, but for something I will only use once every other year or so, I can't justify the price tag.

 

As far as tools for the forks go, here's what I have on order from RMATV that should be here any day now. I also have all the standard type tools a regular guy should have and then some. I already have the fork seal driver.

 

tus_08_kyb_dua_cha_for_cap_wre.jpg

https://www.rockymou...=tusk fork tool

 

That will do it, but having a cone wrench works great when getting into hard to reach places (very useful on suspensions parts).  I had some old ones from when I was a kid.. no idea where they came from (Grandpa's old tools, etc.), but they are really convenient suspension.  For your application, it would only be used when messing with your valving.  There is a small spring in there by the valve stack that is a little hard to get a normal size wrench on.

 

After riding today, I just pulled my forks to service them.  They are all apart, I just need to inspect everything and get them back together before Super-X tonight.

 

Here's a link to the tool I'm talking about.  Park sells a nicer blue one that is just the 14mm, but can't hurt to have more sizes around:

 

http://www.bicyclehe...ml#.VKh0QCvF98E

 

PS: The 1st time taking apart the inner chamber is kind of a pain.  You have to use both those tusk tools you have pictured along with a ratchet and socket (to go over that inner tool).  It loosens in the normal direction (I was wondering if it went the other way at 1st because it was so tight).  I laid the who inner assembly on my work bench and put that big wrench where it goes on the fork and then kind of hold the fork straight with the wrench being braced on the table.  I then used the ratchet to get the inner part to turn.  I'll try take a picture when I get it back together.   


Edited by mch, January 03, 2015 - 03:07 PM.


  • woods-rider

Posted January 03, 2015 - 03:08 PM

#24

That will do it, but having a cone wrench works great when getting into hard to reach places (very useful on suspensions parts).  I had some old ones from when I was a kid.. no idea where they came from (Grandpa's old tools, etc.), but they are really convenient suspension.  For your application, it would only be used when messing with your valving.  There is a small spring in there by the valve stack that is a little hard to get a normal size wrench on.

 

After riding today, I just pulled my forks to service them.  They are all apart, I just need to inspect everything and get them back together before Super-X tonight.

 

Here's a link to the tool I'm talking about.  Park sells a nicer blue one that is just the 14mm, but can't hurt to have more sizes around:

 

http://www.bicyclehe...ml#.VKh0QCvF98E

 

PS: The 1st time taking apart the inner chamber is kind of a pain.  You have to use both those tusk tools you have pictured along with a ratchet and socket (to go over that inner tool).  It loosens in the normal direction (I was wondering if it went the other way at 1st because it was so tight).  I laid the who inner assembly on my work bench and put that big wrench where it goes on the fork and then kind of hold the fork straight with the wrench being braced on the table.  I then used the ratchet to get the inner part to turn.  I'll try take a picture when I get it back together.   

 

 

I have a LOT of duplicate size wrenches. If I need a skinny 14mm I can just use my angle grinder and slim one down.

 

This is my first time working on these type of forks (closed cartridge) so I am giving myself a few days time once I get the tools. Hopefully, after this I can be quick like you and service them in an afternoon.



  • mch

Posted January 03, 2015 - 06:17 PM

#25

Here's what I was talking about: https://drive.google...iew?usp=sharing

 

When you finally get the internal assembly loosed (using that small tool that fits in the top of the fork) all the way, it's under vacuum pressure.  You just have to pull real hard, but steady (like get ready when it breaks loose).  Pour out the oil from the inner chamber (& don"t move / slide that rod sticking into the inner chamber).  It will get real messy if you start going through the stroke with that rod and it's not pointed into a drain pain, etc.  While pointing it into a drain pan, move the rod SLOWLY through the stroke.  The pressure and resulting stream of oil is something else.



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  • woods-rider

Posted January 03, 2015 - 08:14 PM

#26

Here's what I was talking about: https://drive.google...iew?usp=sharing

 

When you finally get the internal assembly loosed (using that small tool that fits in the top of the fork) all the way, it's under vacuum pressure.  You just have to pull real hard, but steady (like get ready when it breaks loose).  Pour out the oil from the inner chamber (& don"t move / slide that rod sticking into the inner chamber).  It will get real messy if you start going through the stroke with that rod and it's not pointed into a drain pain, etc.  While pointing it into a drain pan, move the rod SLOWLY through the stroke.  The pressure and resulting stream of oil is something else.

 

Good to know, thanks for the tip. I should have those two tools soon, thought they would come today actually.



  • mch

Posted January 04, 2015 - 08:29 AM

#27

Here's another nice thing to have for suspension: http://www.amazon.co...ED CYLINDER 500

 

It makes measuring and pouring into forks real easy.  mL and cc are the same, so no conversions required.



  • woods-rider

Posted January 04, 2015 - 10:28 AM

#28

Here's another nice thing to have for suspension: http://www.amazon.co...ED CYLINDER 500

 

It makes measuring and pouring into forks real easy.  mL and cc are the same, so no conversions required.

 

OK, Just ordered one for $5, should be here Wednesday.



  • mch

Posted February 11, 2015 - 09:41 AM

#29

OK, Just ordered one for $5, should be here Wednesday.

 

So how'd it go with your forks?



  • woods-rider

Posted February 11, 2015 - 06:25 PM

#30

So how'd it go with your forks?

 

They are SOO much better than the first go around, in fact, now the shock is the weak link in the suspension (and I thought it was good before just becasue the forks hogged all the negative attention). I rode 47 miles of single track, some fairly rocke and some with a lot of braking bumps. I need to go softer on the shock high speed compression, but I was an idiot and didn't bring a wrench large enough with me. I think I will back it off half a turn and test again, but it won't be this weekend unfortunately.

 

For the first half of the ride I was thinking that the forks may still be a bit harsh on the jarring rocks, roots, etc. Then I hopped on my buddies brand new 2015 YZ250 smoker with nothing done to the suspension except for clicker changes. It made my bike feel like a cow, but a plush cow. I don't know how he rides that MX bike so fast in the woods with how stiff his suspension is, but I did not like it. After getting back on mine for the second half of the day, the suspension seemed awesome. It's probably just by comparison, but it made me love the suspension and loath the weight.






 
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