'12+ WR450F Sprocket Replacement Tips 'n Tricks Request


9 replies to this topic
  • mebgardner

Posted October 28, 2014 - 08:50 AM

#1

I'm getting set to replace the front and rear sprockets for the first time. I've done this on other cycles before, but not this one.

 

So, could I get the "short list" of R+R Tips 'n Tricks?

 

Is the front sprocket a reverse thread? Is there any locker compound used by the OEM, or do I put any on during the replacement?

 

I usually stand on the rear brake and use a breaker bar with a 1/2 in drive to break the CS nut loose. Good enough?

 

I know to inspect the oil seal behind the front sprocket, and look for wear on the steel cylinder that the oil seal presses against.

 

I know not to re-seat the oil seal too deep, that there is no "bottom" depth to re-seating it. It seats to "not past flush" depth.

 

I think I inspect the rear wheel bearings while I'm at it, and re-grease them?

 

Do I need any consumables? A new locking tab ring for the CS nut?

 

Anything else I should know before I get in there?



  • grayracer513

Posted October 28, 2014 - 11:28 AM

#2


Is the front sprocket a reverse thread?

No. Right hand threads.

 

Is there any locker compound used by the OEM, or do I put any on during the replacement?

No. There is a locking tab washer, however.  Thread locker is not required if properly installed

 

I usually stand on the rear brake and use a breaker bar with a 1/2 in drive to break the CS nut loose. Good enough?

Usually.  if it's exceptionally stubborn, you can run a bar through one of the holes in the rear sprocket and the spokes so it lays atop the swing arm to positively lock the wheel.

 

I know to inspect the oil seal behind the front sprocket, and look for wear on the steel cylinder that the oil seal presses against.

I know not to re-seat the oil seal too deep, that there is no "bottom" depth to re-seating it. It seats to "not past flush" depth.

Both good things.  If you remove or replace the collar, be sure you replace the O-ring underneath it on the output shaft

 

I think I inspect the rear wheel bearings while I'm at it, and re-grease them?

Some rear wheel bearings are sealed bearings.  The seals can be carefully picked out for such service

 

Do I need any consumables? A new locking tab ring for the CS nut?

Replacement of the tab washer is not usually needed, but they're cheap.  Get one and keep one or the other for next time.



  • mebgardner

Posted October 28, 2014 - 12:21 PM

#3

Is there a way I can tell if I'm looking at a sealed bearing or not?

 

I've seen them while working on cars / trucks, but never cycles.



  • Krannie McKranface

Posted October 28, 2014 - 01:05 PM

#4

If you can't see the bearing, only the bearing housing, they are sealed.



  • mebgardner

Posted October 28, 2014 - 02:01 PM

#5

 

 

I know to inspect the oil seal behind the front sprocket, and look for wear on the steel cylinder that the oil seal presses against.

I know not to re-seat the oil seal too deep, that there is no "bottom" depth to re-seating it. It seats to "not past flush" depth.

Both good things.  If you remove or replace the collar, be sure you replace the O-ring underneath it on the output shaft

 

This statement.  Does this include a collar removal to just inspect the O-Ring?

 

That is, if I remove the collar to inspect the O-ring underneath it (and the collar for indented wear mark), then I "need to be sure to replace the O-ring..."

 

I think what I'm asking is, if I go in there, I'll need to replace the O-ring in any case?

 

Do I understand that right?


If you can't see the bearing, only the bearing housing, they are sealed.

 

Thank you.


 


Is the front sprocket a reverse thread?

No. Right hand threads.

 

Is there any locker compound used by the OEM, or do I put any on during the replacement?

No. There is a locking tab washer, however.  Thread locker is not required if properly installed

 

I usually stand on the rear brake and use a breaker bar with a 1/2 in drive to break the CS nut loose. Good enough?

Usually.  if it's exceptionally stubborn, you can run a bar through one of the holes in the rear sprocket and the spokes so it lays atop the swing arm to positively lock the wheel.

 

I know to inspect the oil seal behind the front sprocket, and look for wear on the steel cylinder that the oil seal presses against.

I know not to re-seat the oil seal too deep, that there is no "bottom" depth to re-seating it. It seats to "not past flush" depth.

Both good things.  If you remove or replace the collar, be sure you replace the O-ring underneath it on the output shaft

 

I think I inspect the rear wheel bearings while I'm at it, and re-grease them?

Some rear wheel bearings are sealed bearings.  The seals can be carefully picked out for such service

 

Do I need any consumables? A new locking tab ring for the CS nut?

Replacement of the tab washer is not usually needed, but they're cheap.  Get one and keep one or the other for next time.

 

 

... and thank you, sir, for your help.



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  • grayracer513

Posted October 28, 2014 - 02:02 PM

#6

Open bearing:

 

Deep_Groove_Ball_Bearing.jpg

Sealed bearing:

 

51IRGhxnoML._SX342_.jpg



  • mebgardner

Posted October 28, 2014 - 02:04 PM

#7

Open bearing:

 

Deep_Groove_Ball_Bearing.jpg

Sealed bearing:

 

51IRGhxnoML._SX342_.jpg

 

Beauty. Very nice.  Thanks so much. Really, I mean it (no sarcasam).



  • grayracer513

Posted October 28, 2014 - 02:06 PM

#8


...if I remove the collar to inspect the O-ring underneath it (and the collar for indented wear mark), then I "need to be sure to replace the O-ring..."

 

I think what I'm asking is, if I go in there, I'll need to replace the O-ring in any case?

 

Do I understand that right?

 

If the collar remains in place, and there's no evidence of a leak, the O-ring can be left alone.  As I understand it, you don't have a leak now, so although you could simply replace the O-ring anyway, there's no indicated need to unless you disturb it.  Even then, you'd likely be able to reuse the ring.  It's just so cheap that there's no reason not to if it's out.

 

Regarding bearing seals as shown above, should you try to remove them, do so from the outside edge.  Don't pick or pry at the inner diameter, as that is the sealing lip.



  • mebgardner

Posted October 28, 2014 - 03:19 PM

#9

 

Regarding bearing seals as shown above, should you try to remove them, do so from the outside edge.  Don't pick or pry at the inner diameter, as that is the sealing lip.

 

Do you have a gut feel about whether or not this should be done? Or, how often?

 

...and , correct: I do not have any evidence of an oil leak from the CS seal (or any leak for that matter).



  • grayracer513

Posted October 29, 2014 - 06:09 AM

#10

Once a year,  ...ish.  More often if you're in mud all the time and wash the bike with pressure.






 
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