Towing a broken down bike



19 replies to this topic
  • bobpara

Posted September 02, 2014 - 05:00 AM

#1

Does anyone have any experience with towing a broken down bike with another bike? My friend's bike threw the chain the other day and the first few tries made him fall. after a while it got better, but it want pretty

 

On the first try I tried using the footpeg as the anchor point. I seemed to remember reading this somewhere because its close to the CG. Problem was that being down low the knobbies sanded the rope in half very quick.

The guy on the broken down bike had both ends of the rope in his hands. I tied loops in each end for him to hold on to. He could not do it with one hand

 

Next effort was to put the rope around my forks and run the rope straight back. I kind of basically sat on the rope to hold it down (under tension it wanted to rise up). Same scenario with the guy on the broken bike.

 

Luckily the terrain didnt get real rough. I was thinking of both of us getting off and walking the bikes under power.

 

Is there a better way to do this? Better yet a you tube video or something?

 



  • YamaLink

Posted September 02, 2014 - 05:37 AM

#2

My riding group has a "bit" of experience being towed at one point or another. Just part of the beast when trailing riding so much. The long tow strap is hooked around the center crossbar pad on older bikes and on newer bikes they hook it around the handlebar mounts. Of course it's a bit of hilarity no matter the experience level of tower or towee. And that is indeed when you want the GoPro turned on!



  • motoben508

Posted September 02, 2014 - 05:53 AM

#3

For the rider being towed, loop the rope around the cross bar a couple of times and have him hold it. Loop it around just enough so that it isn't too hard to hold but will release if he let's go. I have had success with this before.

  • stevethe

Posted September 02, 2014 - 05:59 AM

#4

Take out any slack in the tow strap prior to taking off. The towed bike is responsible to keep slack out of the tow strap by using a little rear brake. The bike doing the towing has to be smooth no throttle jerks.



  • GP1K

Posted September 02, 2014 - 07:49 AM

#5

Ironically, we just did this exact thing this weekend, as one of our buddy's brand new Husky 310 died and flatly refused to restart via button, kick or bump.

 

On the towed bike, we tied off on the forks just above the fender. On the towing bike, we tried the footpeg at first, but sharp corners to the left were problematic (hook on right foot peg) and it just so happened one bike had a rear tugger strap so we used that instead and it worked pretty good. We were lucky that we didn't have to tow too far back to a where the trail crossed a fire road, and was mostly downhill. It could have been a lot worse.



  • Just_a_trail_rider

Posted September 02, 2014 - 12:36 PM

#6

Take out any slack in the tow strap prior to taking off. The towed bike is responsible to keep slack out of the tow strap by using a little rear brake. The bike doing the towing has to be smooth no throttle jerks.

This is the only way to not end up dragging your buddy behind you.  I have towed and been towed for many miles like this.   I always try to keep the tow line straight, even if it does pull hard to one side.    



  • DrFeelGood

Posted September 03, 2014 - 07:47 AM

#7

Ironically, we just did this exact thing this weekend, as one of our buddy's brand new Husky 310 died and flatly refused to restart via button, kick or bump.

 

On the towed bike, we tied off on the forks just above the fender. On the towing bike, we tried the footpeg at first, but sharp corners to the left were problematic (hook on right foot peg) and it just so happened one bike had a rear tugger strap so we used that instead and it worked pretty good. We were lucky that we didn't have to tow too far back to a where the trail crossed a fire road, and was mostly downhill. It could have been a lot worse.

 

HA!  We also had a buddy... with a Husky 310..  towed via tugger strap this weekend... for the second weekend in a row.  They must make Husky 310 flywheel keys out of butter or jello.



  • GP1K

Posted September 03, 2014 - 07:53 AM

#8

HA!  We also had a buddy... with a Husky 310..  towed via tugger strap this weekend... for the second weekend in a row.  They must make Husky 310 flywheel keys out of butter or jello.

 

Oh wow. This was the second weekend my buddy's 310 conked out on him too. First time it never really got out of the staging area. Not a good sign for the 310!



  • stevethe

Posted September 03, 2014 - 07:58 AM

#9

We had a Husky towed out about a year ago, ignition problems he said. My son got slack in the tow rope and broke my rope. :cry: :rant:



  • beezer

Posted September 03, 2014 - 08:18 AM

#10

What were the issues with them?



Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • avlisj

Posted September 03, 2014 - 08:18 AM

#11

Watch your plastics. Don't be the only 450 in the group cause you will become the tractor. My buddy tied the strap to his sub frame but it somehow looped under his left side numberplate and ripped it off. It's still in the trees at stonyford. Man he was mad. No one ever asks someone on a two stroke to tow. Hint

  • DrFeelGood

Posted September 03, 2014 - 08:58 AM

#12

What were the issues with them?

 

My friends bike is sheering flywheel keys.  It ran great for over a year, then sheered a key.  Went to the shop for repair and then within an hour of seat time, sheered another one.



  • MidlifeCrisisGuy

Posted September 03, 2014 - 09:21 AM

#13

Interesting topic.  Deathly afraid of this happening in our group. 

 

How do you go up big hills ?

 

I had to double my (big) buddy on my WR when his bike quit.  It was terrifying and we were close to the trail head on pretty good trail.  I can't imagine doing it on gnarly singletrack.  But sooner or later one of our bikes is going to quit in the middle of nowhere.


Edited by MidlifeCrisisGuy, September 03, 2014 - 09:23 AM.


  • borgwarner

Posted September 03, 2014 - 10:33 AM

#14

Just remember to never ever fix the rope to the towed bike. The rider of the towed bike must be able to let go.
We once had a situation like this and the rear wheel caught the rope and if the ride would not have realized it, this would have been a bloody mess.

  • GP1K

Posted September 03, 2014 - 10:42 AM

#15

Just remember to never ever fix the rope to the towed bike. The rider of the towed bike must be able to let go.
We once had a situation like this and the rear wheel caught the rope and if the ride would not have realized it, this would have been a bloody mess.

 

How would you attach the towed bike then? It's not like the rider can hold the rope and his bike at the same time.

 

What we did was tie the tow strap off on the forks of the towed bike. The other end of the strap had a hook like a tie-down, we put that in the tugger strap on the rear of the towing bike. When they came to a downhill section, the tower would unhook and toss the strap to the towee, who would take the slack up out of the way until they needed to hook up again.



  • Bryan Bosch

Posted September 03, 2014 - 10:44 AM

#16

http://www.thumperta...-motorcycle-r47



  • GP1K

Posted September 03, 2014 - 10:48 AM

#17

So that's how... thanks!



  • avlisj

Posted September 03, 2014 - 10:52 AM

#18

Interesting topic. Deathly afraid of this happening in our group.

How do you go up big hills ?

I had to double my (big) buddy on my WR when his bike quit. It was terrifying and we were close to the trail head on pretty good trail. I can't imagine doing it on gnarly singletrack. But sooner or later one of our bikes is going to quit in the middle of nowhere.


All hands on the bike, pushing up while someone up top pulls with webbing or rope. Could try towing up hill with everybody else pushing if not to gnarly for pull bike. Careful of clutch and overheat on pull bike ( don't want 2 DNF's)Always carry as much webbing/rope as your comfortable with. Know where the fire roads are. (GPS).
Had a buddy hide is bike in the scrub, come back a couple days later with fix and ride out.
Again never fix rope to pulled bike. Need to be able to disconnect. Especially on fire road.

  • Sidewinder1970

Posted September 04, 2014 - 10:01 AM

#19

Just hold on....

Attached Thumbnails

  • image.jpg


  • redhurricane

Posted September 04, 2014 - 10:04 AM

#20

For the rider being towed, loop the rope around the cross bar a couple of times and have him hold it. Loop it around just enough so that it isn't too hard to hold but will release if he let's go. I have had success with this before.


this when "towing" is the last alternative to pushing. I prefer to have a boot pushing on the exhaust of the dead bike. way more control and less fatigue on arms and hands.




 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.