What chain and sprocket should I buy



11 replies to this topic
  • tophermac412

Posted August 08, 2014 - 05:43 PM

#1

2013 yz450f.. I ride florida tracks.. not worried about light weight. I just want something that will last the longest..whats the best chain and sprocket?

  • torkd14

Posted August 08, 2014 - 06:03 PM

#2

I run a renthal 520 R-1 works gold o-ring chain with 13 tooth front renthal steel sprocket and I've used a mix of rears, always steel.

I like the supersprox rear steel sprocket because it's black and only $39.99 on rmatv.

Right now I have a sunstar 520 works-z rear steel and it is also working well but double the price. This sprocket is odd, wasn't expecting it to look like it does. Each tooth is staggered side to side for better mud clearing they say. I wouldn't be able to notice the difference.

  • Blazer85

Posted August 08, 2014 - 06:28 PM

#3

I've had good luck with my supersprox



  • Dragon67

Posted August 08, 2014 - 06:46 PM

#4

Honestly the best kit:  http://www.rockymoun...g-Chain?v=10891

 

Here is the description in case the link doesn't work:  It's out of stock for a reason.  

Primary Drive Alloy Kit & X-Ring Chain $104.99 

 

The key to sprocket life is the chain.  The reason for an alloy sprocket in the back is much less un-sprung weight, and you are going to replace it with the chain anyway. If you want different gearing (or if you want it now) you will have to buy the components separately.  The reason I recommend the Primary Drive stuff is because I use it, and I replace chains and sprockets a lot less than I used to.  That said I won't argue with torkd14's choice of a Renthal o-ring.  I am sure it is a very high quality chain.  The reason for the rings is to keep lube between the rollers and pins, and to keep grit out.  That's why they last so long.  The longer the chain lasts, the longer the sprockets will last.  I am sure horsepower losses are measurable, but my guess is they are fractional.  Probably in the .25 or lower range.  Cleaning an o-ring chain requires washing as normal and spraying with WD-40.  In other words, maintenance free in my experience.    



  • tophermac412

Posted August 09, 2014 - 04:40 AM

#5

The renthal r1 works is not an o-ring chain @torkd14...I was thinking about going with the supersprox front and rear and then going with DID 520 vx2 x-ring chain gold color. Has any ran an x-ring chain?

  • 717 MOTORSPORTS

Posted August 09, 2014 - 05:17 AM

#6

The DID X ring is a really good chain. Use that chain with steel sprockets, and you'll be good

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  • Katzat

Posted August 09, 2014 - 06:16 AM

#7

The reason for an alloy sprocket in the back is much less un-sprung weight


I understand and appreciate all of your points, except this. Please explain/elaborate on the unsprung weight thing and why it is more important than the other weight on the bike or rider.

Thanks.

  • dirteta

Posted August 09, 2014 - 01:48 PM

#8

Ironman sprockets and DID ERV3 chain. Not cheap but unbeatable for longevity IMO.

  • The_Vernsker

Posted August 09, 2014 - 08:28 PM

#9

Renthal steel or Supersprox steel spockets and the Renthal R1 chain.



  • jkylnhyde

Posted August 10, 2014 - 07:17 AM

#10

Ironman sprockets and DID ERV3 chain. Not cheap but unbeatable for longevity IMO.


Beautiful words spoken above

  • Jim813

Posted August 10, 2014 - 08:10 AM

#11

You can't beat ironman sprockets from dirt tricks. I used one set paired with a Regina z ring chain for over 200 hours. The front sprocket was toast but the chain and rear sprocket were still in excellent shape.

  • grayracer513

Posted August 10, 2014 - 09:20 AM

#12

I understand and appreciate all of your points, except this. Please explain/elaborate on the unsprung weight thing and why it is more important than the other weight on the bike or rider.

Thanks.

 

Ideally, the suspension would work so well that the wheels would follow the ground contour perfectly while the bike went along dead level without moving vertically at all.  As you visualize this happening, you see the wheels moving vertically up over obstacles and down again.  As the wheel runs up a rise, it will have inertia that will try to make it keep moving upward when it gets to the top instead of dropping down the slope on the other side, and that inertia is a direct product of the wheel's weight.  It's simple, the heavier the wheel assembly is, the harder it is for the suspension to control well.

 

Two things wear a sprocket: dirt between the sprocket and chain, and a chain that's worn out of spec.  You can avoid the dirt thing to a great extent by using a good, low tack chain lube, like Maxima's Synthetic Chain Guard.  Lube the chain at least 8 hours before you ride, and it will collect very little trail junk.  Review the procedure in your service manual for measuring chain wear and ditch the chain before it goes over 2% longer than new, and you can make most aluminum sprockets last for over a year. 

 

I use Regina ORN-6 chains with Tag Metals hard anodized rear sprockets and medium priced fronts (currently a Pro-Circuit).  This setup lasts me nearly two years of desert racing.  The chain just doesn't wear much at all, and by the time it is stretched enough to replace, the chain guides have worn the top and bottom edges of the plates nearly down to the rollers.







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