Can you use gytr tuner with any year 450 that is fuel injected?!



16 replies to this topic
  • ttr230rider6

Posted June 12, 2014 - 03:27 PM

#1

Basically as the title says, can you use a gytr tuner with any year yz450 that is fuel injected? A guy locally is selling one that he had on his 2011 450. I will be using it on a 2014.

Are they model specific or am I good?

  • Goforaride

Posted June 12, 2014 - 04:02 PM

#2

Basically as the title says, can you use a gytr tuner with any year yz450 that is fuel injected? A guy locally is selling one that he had on his 2011 450. I will be using it on a 2014.
Are they model specific or am I good?

yes! Use it!

  • Gaz929

Posted June 14, 2014 - 02:44 PM

#3

While on this subject I was wondering if you can use the same device on different bikes to tune them? IE I tune my bike then my mate tunes his straight after or do they only hold one map?

Reason I ask is my friend said he will pay half towards the device so he can use it on his 13 YZ450f also.

  • drtrcr400

Posted June 14, 2014 - 03:32 PM

#4

Yes, you can.

  • Goforaride

Posted June 14, 2014 - 03:38 PM

#5

Yes, you can.

+1

  • zeuszuki

Posted June 14, 2014 - 08:26 PM

#6

While on this subject I was wondering if you can use the same device on different bikes to tune them? IE I tune my bike then my mate tunes his straight after or do they only hold one map?

Reason I ask is my friend said he will pay half towards the device so he can use it on his 13 YZ450f also.

 

Yep, and you can load 9 pre set maps to swap and choose. I still have the tuner for my '11 and use it on my '14.

Can also be used on the '14 YZ250f.

It is money well spent IMO



  • ttr230rider6

Posted June 17, 2014 - 05:31 PM

#7

Thanks for the help guys. I bought the tuner this evening. Just another quick question. In the map database sticky, most of the people posting maps are from 2010s or 2011s. Are these same maps applicable to my 2014?

  • drtrcr400

Posted June 17, 2014 - 06:16 PM

#8

Thanks for the help guys. I bought the tuner this evening. Just another quick question. In the map database sticky, most of the people posting maps are from 2010s or 2011s. Are these same maps applicable to my 2014?

You can find some maps for the '14 on Yamaha's website. Also check out the MXA test for their recommendations.

Edited by drtrcr400, June 17, 2014 - 06:17 PM.


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  • ttr230rider6

Posted June 18, 2014 - 01:22 PM

#9

Thanks for the help. I have another question tho. If the bike comes from the factory lean. Then using negative numbers on the fi side would make it even more lean, is that correct?

  • grayracer513

Posted June 18, 2014 - 01:45 PM

#10

 If the bike comes from the factory lean...

 

Who says it does?



  • ttr230rider6

Posted June 18, 2014 - 02:40 PM

#11

I just heard people say that here. On a related note. I just flashed my bike to a different map. Came back to put a different one on it. And if it's plugged in the tuner won't turn on but if it's not turned on and I try and plug it in. It turns off. Anyone else have this problem?

  • crf917rider

Posted June 18, 2014 - 03:05 PM

#12

My 14 was deff lean from the factory

  • grayracer513

Posted June 18, 2014 - 03:43 PM

#13

I just heard people say that here. On a related note. I just flashed my bike to a different map. Came back to put a different one on it. And if it's plugged in the tuner won't turn on but if it's not turned on and I try and plug it in. It turns off. Anyone else have this problem?

 

If it was lean, why would some maps run zeros or negative numbers for fuel at various spots on the map?

 

First thing when the tuner acts like that is to change the batteries.



  • zeuszuki

Posted June 18, 2014 - 11:23 PM

#14

I just heard people say that here. On a related note. I just flashed my bike to a different map. Came back to put a different one on it. And if it's plugged in the tuner won't turn on but if it's not turned on and I try and plug it in. It turns off. Anyone else have this problem?

 

Flat batteries - keep a spare set, the tuner loves them!

I don't run the back cover on my tuner any longer so I can swap them out quickly, make sure to keep the tuner dry if you do this.



  • sploon

Posted June 18, 2014 - 11:57 PM

#15

So i currently just ordered a 2015 yzf450. So i can only assume the GYTR tuner will work with the 15 model also? cause thats on order to.



  • ttr230rider6

Posted June 19, 2014 - 04:35 AM

#16

If it was lean, why would some maps run zeros or negative numbers for fuel at various spots on the map?

First thing when the tuner acts like that is to change the batteries.


Pretty much everything is always jetted lean from the factory. I have heard countless people say this on here and on car forums and everything. I dunno why they do it bit it seems to be the reality of it. And I guess you can use negative numbers in the maps if you are located in a region that would force you to lean it out to make it run properly. That seems to be my outlook on it. I dunno if it's right or not. Someone could shed some light to get another opinion.

  • grayracer513

Posted June 19, 2014 - 07:35 AM

#17

Four strokes have the ability to run well with air/fuel ratios that range well below or above the stoichiometric (chemically ideal balance) level. In particular, they're capable of producing fairly good performance when they're nearly drowning in fuel.  People will assume, "the bikes are built lean", add fuel or jet bigger and get away with it, and then think, "See? It must have been lean".  The fact is, that more than 99% of everybody has never had their bike on a dyno, or connected to a gas analyzer, so they really have no idea.  A lot of them think they do, of course, and every once in a while, they're right.  Then again, if you take any reasonably good running bike and went +1 on the fuel in every cell, and changed none of the timing, I'll bet it barely makes a difference.

 

The bikes come with timing curves and fuel maps intended to produce an overall power delivery that some committee of engineers at Yamaha decided they wanted the YZ to act like, and they are fine tuned to a baseline set of atmospheric conditions that are selected for being an average/midpoint of the whole normal range.  In the days of carburetors, this usually meant that if you lived and rode at sea level, you thought the bike was lean, but if you lived in Denver or Flagstaff, you thought it was too rich. 

 

The EFI bikes are self-correcting for altitude.  Fuel delivery as written in the map is modified by input from the atmospheric pressure sensor and the two temperature sensors, automatically taking the altitude into account. 

 

A lot of times, people will try to fuel map/jet their way out of a problem that is caused by the timing map.  The '05, '08, & '09 models were great examples of that.  All kinds of time got spent trying to clear up soft spots in the power curve with jetting, but they never really went away until the CDI was changed for a different year model.

 

Another aspect of the "they're all lean" concept is that sometimes the lean nature isn't the fault of the fuel system, and making it richer won't always fix it without causing a new problem.  The '10-'13 models make about 50-53 HP, variably.  The '14 makes 58 (fifty-eight, count 'em).  That's 129 HP/Liter.  That's a powerful single cylinder engine, and because of the valve timing that allows it to do that, it's not an engine that will idle well at less than 1500 RPM, or want to be very responsive at less than 2500 no matter what you do to help it.  The intake valves open earlier than the ones in a Camry by quite a bit, and the compression stroke will blow air backward in the throttle body if it runs too slowly.  With carbs, you can try to cover up this low speed "sogginess" with extra fuel, but you end up causing the bike to be prone to stalling when you chop the throttle suddenly at low speeds.  EFI is a little better at dealing with this, but even so an engine that snotty isn't going to like running below 3000, and you can't make it happy about it no matter what.

 

Regarding timing, a change in the timing map will at times require a change in fuel mapping to match it.  Look over the mappings for your year model and you can see where this has been done.







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