CDR Yamaha - Highly modded WR450F Race bike


11 replies to this topic
  • Navaho6

Posted May 08, 2014 - 05:53 PM

#1

I'd love to get my hands on this one - http://transmoto.com...-yamaha-wr450f/

 

From the article:

 

Recently, technicians from Yamaha’s Japanese HQ have been out to Australia to test with CDR. It’s rumoured that season 2014 will see the same model of WR-F being campaigned, with an all-new reverse-cylinder enduro bike due in 2015. With the factory actively taking feedback from testing on Australian soil, expect the production version of the next-generation WR450F to handle the rocky terrain and fine dust of our country even better.


Edited by Navaho6, May 08, 2014 - 06:04 PM.


  • Krannie McKranface

Posted May 08, 2014 - 08:15 PM

#2

It's all off the shelf stuff

The WR motor responds very well to a better breathing head.



  • Alstar450

Posted May 08, 2014 - 09:53 PM

#3

Definitely not excited about a reverse cylinder WR... Not until these 2014+ YZ's have been proven to work right, and that's several years down the road, not next year in 2015.

  • Navaho6

Posted May 09, 2014 - 04:12 AM

#4

It's all off the shelf stuff

The WR motor responds very well to a better breathing head.

 

Most of it, ,maybe.  They will not elaborate as stated in the first paragraph.  They did admit that the cams were custom-built.

 

Looks like, as you would expect, that Chris Hollis is also riding a similar bike.  YZ450 forks and swingarm/linkage.

 

If Yamaha would shave a good bit of weight off the current model, I would sell my '13 and get the newer one.


Edited by Navaho6, May 09, 2014 - 04:20 AM.


  • Krannie McKranface

Posted May 09, 2014 - 05:08 AM

#5

Most of it, ,maybe.  They will not elaborate as stated in the first paragraph.  They did admit that the cams were custom-built.

 

Looks like, as you would expect, that Chris Hollis is also riding a similar bike.  YZ450 forks and swingarm/linkage.

 

If Yamaha would shave a good bit of weight off the current model, I would sell my '13 and get the newer one.

 It's only 14lbs heavier than a KTM450EXC....and the frames and tripleclamps don't break, they have real torque and real suspension, etc etc. 



  • Navaho6

Posted May 09, 2014 - 05:41 PM

#6

Love the '13 motor and suspension but Yamaha could at least try to lighten the bike up a little, not just mask the weight.  Give me the YZ swing arm and linkage, please. 



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  • mc1hd

Posted May 09, 2014 - 06:48 PM

#7

+Subframe, anyone here tried a 250yz subframe on the wr450?  Bike has alway's been a little tall for me plus it would plug up that ugly left hand side hole. 



  • MidlifeCrisisGuy

Posted May 13, 2014 - 09:33 AM

#8

Love the '13 motor and suspension but Yamaha could at least try to lighten the bike up a little, not just mask the weight.  Give me the YZ swing arm and linkage, please. 

 

The same generation YZ swing arm and linkage is the same as the 2011-2013 WR's.  

 

The newer generation YZ swingarm and linkage is only about 8 oz lighter.  Source: I had them weighed. 

 

I was all set to do the swap myself until we weighed them.  The dirt bike mags that claim the new parts are so much lighter are wrong.

 

See my thread on how to drop 20+ pounds from a WR450F.  Its not very hard.  Stock weight is 260 dry.  Mine is at about 241 dry.

 

FYI, that article says his bike is running a stock WR450F rear shock.  I'm not sure about that, because it appears to me that the shock for the next generation swing arms is slightly longer than the current shocks.   I haven't verified this yet though.

 

FYI, you can tell what generation the rear swing arm is by looking for the cross pin.  The 2011-2014 WR450F have the previous generation arm with the cross pin going through the arm.   You can see this by looking for the round covers that cover the pin.   The next generation arm doesn't have the covers because the pin doesn't go through the arm.

 

The arms are not a total swap because I believe the axle size changed from year to year.   Some fiddling with the axle retainers will probably be necessary.


Edited by MidlifeCrisisGuy, May 13, 2014 - 10:12 AM.


  • Navaho6

Posted May 13, 2014 - 10:40 AM

#9

When they came out with the new gen. YZ swingarm in 2009, the selling point was that is was lighter and that it allowed for more flex, supposedly making the YZ better in the corners.  I really expected the newer WR to come with that swingarm since it inherited the YZ250 frame.



  • 270winchester

Posted May 13, 2014 - 04:28 PM

#10

I compared the swingarm on my yz250 zinger to that on my wr and they looked identical.  I did not measure or weigh anything, but they looked to be the same part.  If so, they are a very old design.  Sure wish the wr was as light as the yz...  



  • mc1hd

Posted May 13, 2014 - 08:03 PM

#11

So Midlife did you ever get around or want to change the sub frame out, still think if everything else on the bike will suppot it this is something I would want to try.  My bike has been on a weight loss from day two and no where near where I would like.



  • MidlifeCrisisGuy

Posted May 14, 2014 - 06:31 AM

#12

So Midlife did you ever get around or want to change the sub frame out, still think if everything else on the bike will suppot it this is something I would want to try.  My bike has been on a weight loss from day two and no where near where I would like.

 

I don't see any reason to change the sub frame.   

 

My next move is to improve my riding position.   The cockpit is too small for me.  I'm 6'1".

 

My bike presently weighs 240 pounds dry (calculated).  Some of that weight was rotating and a lot of it was high up on the bike.  Its way lighter and way more flickable than it was stock.  Combine that with better throttle response from the pipe and it feels like an entirely new bike.

 

At this point its 15 pounds heavier than my friend's purpose built YZ250F woods racer.  I can live with that.  If 160 pound riders can ride 225 pound bikes, I can certainly ride a 240 pound bike.






 
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