riding stabalizers



21 replies to this topic
  • amerrill130

Posted January 11, 2004 - 11:49 AM

#1

Does anyone know about the stabalizers that you mount to the handle bars, what do they do, are they worth the money to invest in it? I have seen a lot and read a lot about them. :)

  • Indy_WR450

Posted January 11, 2004 - 12:38 PM

#2

Unless you have real fast reaction skills any stabilizer will save your ass in many near crash situations. If you like to ride hard and have slower than average reactions get one. I recommend Scotts if you can afford it. :)

  • desertfoxx

Posted January 11, 2004 - 02:04 PM

#3

Stabilizers help in all riding conditions. Since my emergency room insurance copay went up this year to 100$, the stabilizer pays for itself in short order! :)

  • gfergtr74

Posted January 11, 2004 - 02:12 PM

#4

Nice bit of justification there. :)

  • tp3dxf

Posted January 11, 2004 - 07:54 PM

#5

My GPR saved my arse about a half dozen times today. I raced the Jackrabbist Hare and Hound. It was a blast. I have had my GPR for about 6 months and I will never not have one on any bike I own. I recommend it as a first upgrade. Get one GPR, Scotts, Rtt, just try one they really work.

  • SoCA_DRZ

Posted January 12, 2004 - 02:28 PM

#6

Hey, I know I am in the wrong forum, I ride a DRZ. I was looking up a few things for a buddy who rides a WR. I can't recommend my GPR stabilizer enough. This is the first bike that I have had one on, and I would not want to ride without it again! Specially in the CA desert, where thinks can pop out of the brush very quickly.

  • Ronnie Mac

Posted January 12, 2004 - 08:51 PM

#7

How hard is it to instale? Could a more-on with half a brain make it work? No just kidding, I have pannorama comp, will this cause a problem.

  • Hick

Posted January 12, 2004 - 09:11 PM

#8

How hard is it to instale? Could a more-on with half a brain make it work? No just kidding, I have pannorama comp, will this cause a problem.


Very simple to install.

If your comp. is mounted to the bar clamp you'll have to move it...

  • gimprvr

Posted January 12, 2004 - 09:48 PM

#9

has anyone tried the RTT Stabilizer yet? It looks like great new technology but.... it's kind of hard to go away from what works, Scotts, GPR..., any comments?

  • Indy_WR450

Posted January 13, 2004 - 04:18 AM

#10

The which is best argument has been kicked around these forums for a while now. I have not heard anything bad about any of them. Recent dirt bike mag article tested all the brands and all worked very well. Scotts was the winner due to the design features and adjustments. In reality they all work better than without. :)

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  • renegade

Posted January 13, 2004 - 11:17 AM

#11

has anyone tried the RTT Stabilizer yet? It looks like great new technology but.... it's kind of hard to go away from what works, Scotts, GPR..., any comments?


I've had one for several months. here's the pro's and con's:
Pro: Very nice machining, the tripleclamp is a piece of art. The thumb operated switch is oh so very slick, the damper is on or off with a flick of a switch without your hands leaving the bars.. No damper to try and fit on top of or under your bars. The mounts give you 4 different front/back mounting positions.
Cons: it's harder to take with you to another bike. If you switch to a bike that has a different triple clamp combination, you either send it back to RTT for a "replacement", which costs money, or sell it.

  • Disco

Posted January 13, 2004 - 11:38 AM

#12

Good tips Renny-

I've been thinking about doing a triple clamp / stabilizer upgrade myself but the cost/benefit thing you know...I look at it as an expensive upgrade that I wont see much results from until at the point when I am about to wipe out.

But from the posts here and from the people I've talked to, it sounds like a "must do". Would you have any recommendations for a medium quality (not top dollar) setup? I guess I'd need a triple clamp that will fit pro-tapers, (and whats this I hear about a bottom triple clamp?) the stabilizer itself, and the mounting kit? And if I can squeeze ONE more question in...what is the scoop on rubber mounted pro taper mounts?

Thanks !!

Dan

  • Hick

Posted January 13, 2004 - 02:29 PM

#13

...that I wont see much results from until at the point when I am about to wipe out.




Not necessarily. This will vary across bikes, styles, skill level and terrain, but my damper comes into play everywhere, all the time. Recently a riding buddy turned my low-speed damping down a half turn when I wasn't looking. I noticed immediately.

Would you have any recommendations for a medium quality (not top dollar) setup? I guess I'd need a triple clamp that will fit pro-tapers, (and whats this I hear about a bottom triple clamp?) the stabilizer itself, and the mounting kit? And if I can squeeze ONE more question in...what is the scoop on rubber mounted pro taper mounts?





I think stock clamps are fine, unfortunately the one-piece Yamaha design means you are stuck w/ 7/8" bars. But is this really that unfortunate?? If you buy some Renthals and mount a Scotts backwards you will have some padding/protection, unlike w/ Pro Tapers (or Fat Bars). A damper is a much more rational use of your $$ than new clamps ($$$). Having said that, Scotts normally has a special on their top clamp, damper kit, damper, and a pair of Pro Tapers for $600.

You can probably save on the order of $50 by going w/ a GPR, but I hesitate to recommend them, although I like them fine. The problem they may pose for the damper neophyte is lack of low-speed adjustability. On the Scotts you can limit the sweep (amount of steering travel over which the damper operates) and low-speed damping to the point that you don't see any results until you are about to eat it. The GPR is much stiffer, this is probably why it is popular out west (I run heavier oil in my Scott's and have the low-speed set only a few clicks from full damping).


SteeringStabilizer.com has the best prices on dampers and kits ($570 for a clamp/bar/damper kit). They are spendy, there is no real way around that. Even used Scotts dampers will fetch at least $200 (and then you still need the mounting kit).

To mount a damper (Scotts or GPR) you need a top bar clamp and post, you don't need to replace either of the triple clamps. The RTT is a damper integrated into a top triple clamp.

As for rubber mounted bar clamps, Honda and Kawasaki use them, and you can get aftermarket retrofits for your bike. They do help with vibration a little bit, but are more prone to getting tweaked in a spill. Is that what you mean by "rubber mounted?"

Hope this helps.

  • renegade

Posted January 13, 2004 - 03:55 PM

#14

Het Dan. Hick covered it all real well there which is good, cause I'm all tuckered out from lot's of internet action today. I've got blisters on my fingertips, and my keyboard is smoking! Talk to you soon.

  • Lowedog

Posted January 13, 2004 - 07:09 PM

#15

Renegade,
Are you saying that the RTT can be turned on or off with the thumb adjuster? If so that may be the way to go.

I put a GPR on my WR450 last summer and was not happy with it at all. I felt like it made the bike handle way too slow. It seemed like to me it was like puting a fifty pound saddlebag over my tank. It made the reaction time for me way too slow. I liked it for the wide open straight stuff but it was too slow for the technical stuff. Fortunately for me GPR is a first class company and gave me a full refund. I would not be afraid to buy anything from them.

Sounds like the RTT may be the way to go with the on-off capability. Joey at GPR said that we may see one of theirs with an on-off switch in a year or so.

Later,
Lowedog

  • renegade

Posted January 14, 2004 - 07:11 AM

#16

Renegade,
Are you saying that the RTT can be turned on or off with the thumb adjuster? If so that may be the way to go.

I put a GPR on my WR450 last summer and was not happy with it at all. I felt like it made the bike handle way too slow. It seemed like to me it was like puting a fifty pound saddlebag over my tank. It made the reaction time for me way too slow. I liked it for the wide open straight stuff but it was too slow for the technical stuff. Fortunately for me GPR is a first class company and gave me a full refund. I would not be afraid to buy anything from them.

Sounds like the RTT may be the way to go with the on-off capability. Joey at GPR said that we may see one of theirs with an on-off switch in a year or so.

Later,
Lowedog

Lowedog, that is correct. A thumb operated lever mounts on the left side of your handlebar. With a flick of the thumb, and your hand still fully on the grip, you can switch from fully off, to half on, to fully on. On top of the triple clamp are the different damping settings, numbered one thru seven. So let's say you have that on number 4. When you flick the thumb lever to the halfway point, you get a damping value of two, and when you flick it all the way, you get a damping value of four. It is VERY SLICK.

  • renegade

Posted January 14, 2004 - 07:42 AM

#17

When you look at the cost of the RTT, it may seem very expensive at first. But when you consider that you are getting a real nice top triple clamp in the deal, and you look at the costs that may be involed with getting a scotts [ Posted Image triple clamp, adaptors, etc.], the RTT becomes competitive in price.
www.rttmotorsports.com

  • Greg_C

Posted January 14, 2004 - 08:40 AM

#18

Most of the guys I have seen run WER or Scotts on the bottom clamp above the fender. Can this setup be run with our headlights? I am thinking about a stabilizer but don’t want to go to a YZ # plate. I see the one built into the triple clamp will work but my buddy has a used Scotts that he will sell me for $200.

  • Disco

Posted January 14, 2004 - 09:55 AM

#19

Way to go Renny-

Good work on adding the pic in. I went to Rtt.com and from what I can tell, it's going to be about $600 for this deal. Can you tell me if there is a cheaper way to get one of these things??

I guess for me, it is hard to beleive that for that kind of money, I will be happy with the benefit this provides. But from what everyone in this thread has explained, sounds like I'll be sorry I didnt do it sooner rather than later.

One question though- you mentioned that this price actually begins to look better once you realize you are getting a real nice triple clamp along with the stabilizer. Again, I'm new to the stabilizer world, but what is the benefit to having an aftermarket triple clamp such as this one? Does the stock WR triple clamp leave something to be desired? And can you please help to understand why they sell bottom triple clamps? Why would I need to replace the stock?

Thanks again everyone, REALLY good info!!

DD

  • renegade

Posted January 14, 2004 - 10:17 AM

#20

A cheaper way to get one: I lucked out; a TT member was selling his DRZ and getting a two-smoker, so he put the RTT in the TT classifieds, where I picked it up for I believe $400.00. But I haven't seen many of these at all in the TT classifieds, so perhaps ebay would be the place to look.

Stock triple clamps are usually forgings/castings. Aftermarket clamps are usually machined from billet, which results in a stronger clamp. Many aftermarket clamps offer adjustable handlebar location, like the RTT does.
Rtt offers the lower triple clamp should someone want one to match the upper.
The first few rides with the RTT, I took by bike through some really rocky, rooted trails up in my neck of the woods. My immediate impression was " who took all the rocks out of the trail?" It was amazing how well it cleaned up all the deflections I normally would of been experiencing. I think that after riding a bike equiped with a stabilizer, you will appreciate it and thank yourself for making the investment.




 
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