YZ450 shock - worth it?


14 replies to this topic
  • RockerYZWR

Posted February 19, 2014 - 09:50 PM

#1

I have a line on a 2007 YZ450 shock already sprung for my weight (with a factory Ti spring) and as far as I know, stock valving.

My two questions are:
- Is the shock a direct swap with the '07-11 WR450 shock?

- Is this a worthwhile effort (in light of the fact that I could just revalve my stock shock for a little bit less)?

I know there's probably a pound or two to be lost with the Ti spring, but I'm wondering how different the stock YZ valving is from the WR's and if that combined with the weight loss would make this worthwhile.

Primary usage is (increasingly faster) dune and trail riding, eventually enduro and hare scramble racing, and one major goal is bottoming resistance off jumps.

I also just bought some SSS forks off an '06, so this would be paired up with that front end (which I will revalve and spring for me as well).

Thanks for any advice.

  • jjcoffman

Posted February 19, 2014 - 10:33 PM

#2

I'm interested in this as well. I have a yz450 with new seals and set to my weight I'm selling and I bought a wr450 and have read that people recommend the swap.

I just wonder how much of a difference if will make since I haven't had a chance to ride the wr off-road
Maybe I'll try to take both out before I sell the YZ and give you an answer jumping from bike to bike

  • Krannie McKranface

Posted February 20, 2014 - 08:24 AM

#3

IMHO, changing from a stock WR shock to the stock 2006 YZ 250/450 shock is an upgrade, in pretty much all respects.

 

However, having your stock shock re-sprung and re-valved for your weight and riding style is also much better than the stock shock, and unless you do a lot of stand-up aggressive riding, will work just fine. 

 

...and doing the same to the stock YZ suspension is even that much better. 

 

 

This issue with the stock suspension in general is that it is designed to work best from the lightest to medium impact and shaft speed only.

Even after rebuilding/re-valving, it will never 'keep up' with the YZ components under heavy/fast duress, without entirely loosing supple control.

 

So, if you throw your bike around, wheels off the ground a lot, need to traverse whoops at speed, prefer stand up riding, then you will greatly benefit from YZ suspension front and rear.

 

This applies to POST 2005 YZ suspension components only. 

Previous years are nearly identical or exactly identical to the WR componentry.


Edited by TheKoolAidMadeMeSick, February 20, 2014 - 08:25 AM.


  • RockerYZWR

Posted February 20, 2014 - 09:28 AM

#4

Thanks, Krannie.  I've got my stock WR shock sprung for me (RT 5.8 kg/mm), race sag set to about 109 mm right now, and clickers as close as I think I'm going to get them for where I spend most of my time.  I don't notice any real problems, but I fully realize I probably don't have the front and rear end balanced perfectly and I most likely deal with and try to make the best of a less than optimized set-up through increased riding effort, going slower, and tweaks to riding style because I simply don't know any better - in other words, I've never ridden a bike that was set up perfectly for me, so every improvement I've made so far has seemed really great.  But I know there has to be much more front and rear end traction to be had and a more confidence-inspiring front end feel out there.

 

So this (going to the SSS forks and either revalving or replacing the shock) is all an effort to find my best set-up.

 

BTW, I got the forks for $400 shipped, and they appear to have never been opened and are in like new condition.  Pretty happy with that find.



  • crb357

Posted February 20, 2014 - 03:25 PM

#5

The SSS forks yes, huge upgrade.

I always thought the shock was the same, just the valving and set up was for MX, not trails.

You should call a few Tuners and ask them this question. Save you from buying the same thing you already have.

  • RockerYZWR

Posted February 20, 2014 - 04:09 PM

#6

Good call - I'll ask around.  Thanks for the idea.



  • TX-SANDMAN

Posted February 22, 2014 - 07:34 AM

#7

Let us know how it works out ... I think the WR shock is damped so soft seems like the YZ would be good with just a few clicks out.

 

 

Primary usage is (increasingly faster) dune and trail riding, eventually enduro and hare scramble racing, and one major goal is bottoming resistance off jumps.

Sounds like YZ territory to me.



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  • RockerYZWR

Posted February 22, 2014 - 08:59 AM

#8

Sounds like YZ territory to me.

Yeah, I think you're right. Electric start definitely has its place at times and the kickstand is really nice to have, but I don't really ride at night or on the street (I have it plated but normally leave it and the blinkers off). I flip flop between making this a do everything bike, versus keeping this for on/off-road use and building a dedicated off-roader.

As far as the shock, I'm really thinking I will just revalve it and call it good.

  • grayracer513

Posted February 24, 2014 - 02:58 PM

#9

I would have to disagree with TKMMS's evaluation of the modified WR vs. the modified or stock YZ450 shock, having worked on and with both.  The only thing keeping the rear suspension of a WR form being every bit as good as a YZ450 is the weight of the bike and the heavier 18" rear tire.  There just isn't any particular difference in the shock internals, other than the valving and the shaft diameter.

 

In point of fact, some tuners prefer the smaller 16mm shock shaft to the later YZ 18mm shaft because of the increased load the larger shaft puts on the high speed circuit.  The smaller shaft is a bit easier to get better compliance out of in rocky sections. 

 

IMO, if you can get a revalve done by a competent shop for what you'd pay for the YZ shock, that would be your best bet.  The Ti spring (if it even is Ti) might be worth having, but I don't think any of them were ever issued in rates high enough for a WR unless the rider weight is pretty low.  A lot of the later YZ450 springs were steel.



  • RockerYZWR

Posted February 24, 2014 - 06:22 PM

#10

Thanks, grayracer.

My intent would be to revalve it myself with RT parts, in the spirit of doing as much as I can in my own garage, and then I'd have to find someplace to service the nitrogen. All said and done, the total job would likely be within around $30 of the cost of the used YZ shock - although that said, I should call a suspension place and see what they'd charge. If the included spring was inadequate (which claims to be a factory Yamaha 5.8 kg/mm Ti piece), I think the RT spring I'm currently using would swap in.

I'm not hung up on Ti or tiny amounts of weight reduction, just purely after a more tuneable, better dampened shock as I start to pick up speed and figure this out.

Thanks for the help.

  • KennyMc

Posted February 24, 2014 - 11:43 PM

#11

ENZO Racing said the same thing as Grayracer in reference to the back shock.  I have swapped out the front forks (absolutely worth it IMO) but ENZO said that there wasn't the difference in the shock as there was in the forks and said to save the $$.  That was there recommendation.



  • Krannie McKranface

Posted February 25, 2014 - 06:51 AM

#12

The YZ shock uses all metal parts (instead of plastic) and a shaft that is 30% larger in diameter.

...but it is the same shock design.



  • grayracer513

Posted February 25, 2014 - 09:42 AM

#13

What plastic part is there in the WR shock?  I must have missed that in the last one I did. 

 

As I said, a lot of tuners prefer the smaller shock shaft for off-road use.  BTW, the 18mm shaft is 12.5% larger than the 16mm shaft, not 30.  It does displace over 19% more oil per given amount of travel, however, which is fed through the exchange ("high speed") compression circuit.



  • Krannie McKranface

Posted February 25, 2014 - 10:59 AM

#14

What plastic part is there in the WR shock?  I must have missed that in the last one I did. 

 

As I said, a lot of tuners prefer the smaller shock shaft for off-road use.  BTW, the 18mm shaft is 12.5% larger than the 16mm shaft, not 30.  It does displace over 19% more oil per given amount of travel, however, which is fed through the exchange ("high speed") compression circuit.

I thought the piston was plastic in the WR shock??



  • grayracer513

Posted February 25, 2014 - 01:46 PM

#15

Not even.






 
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