Yz450 or wr450? Pros and cons.

Yamaha YZ450F Yamaha WR450F

54 replies to this topic
  • KuilaWR450f

Posted November 26, 2013 - 10:19 PM

#1

Tossing up which one to purchase. I'm not a motor cross rider just enjoy a nice quick trail. What suits me? And which bike has more maintenance?

  • Monk

Posted November 26, 2013 - 10:31 PM

#2

The WR is a awesome bike. It will be better platform to start with for offroad riding. The electric start is a added bonus as is the wide-ratio transmission....

Maintenance wise they will be about the same. But Yamaha is famous for their reliability, so as long as you keep fresh gas in it, clean air filters, change the oil frequently and get the valves inspected and adjusted when needed, you will be fine....

  • Navaho6

Posted November 27, 2013 - 04:41 AM

#3

I thought about this last year.  Rode a YZ450 (2009) for 15 miles on our woods loop.  In the tighter sections I wanted my WR back.  1st gear just isn't low enough.  Lots of clutch work needed in tght sections.  In the really fast open sections, I wanted to be on the YZ for the suspension.  YZ was in need of a revalve badly.  Too harsh over the roots but great on jumps.  Power really was not an issue. Both bikes have plenty.  Now that the new WR's have modified YZ suspension, there is no reason to not to go with the WR.  It is a more versatile bike.  It will do mx and woods.  I am getting the WR.  Looking for '12 or '13 right now. 



  • 080

Posted November 27, 2013 - 05:36 AM

#4

For just trail riding the WR will be all around easier, from the saddle to the starting to the suspension.



  • grayracer513

Posted November 27, 2013 - 07:55 AM

#5

The '12 model tweaked everything more toward the WR, in my opinion, but there are still things to think about.

 

http://www.thumperta...0/#entry6964372



  • Navaho6

Posted November 27, 2013 - 11:55 AM

#6

If you wanted to, you could shave 20 lbs off the WR by removing a lot of unecessary parts, including the battery and starter.  My friend has a 2012 WR that is hard to start with the e-start button.  Usually takes 2 or 3 tries with the starter but with the kick starter it fires up on the first kick every time.  Starting issues can be resolved but I would prefer the weight reduction.  With the YZ, you'll be kicking, like it or not.

 

Consider that the WR has larger radiators so it may run cooler.

 

I am leary of the new YZ's.  A lot of reviewers say that the front end is very light until you start picking up a lot speed and riding harder.  Not sure how that would work out on slower trails.  Don't think that the YZ would have as good a resale either. 



  • cowboyona426

Posted November 27, 2013 - 12:07 PM

#7

If you wanted to, you could shave 20 lbs off the WR by removing a lot of unecessary parts, including the battery and starter.  My friend has a 2012 WR that is hard to start with the e-start button.  Usually takes 2 or 3 tries with the starter but with the kick starter it fires up on the first kick every time.  Starting issues can be resolved but I would prefer the weight reduction.  With the YZ, you'll be kicking, like it or not.

 

Consider that the WR has larger radiators so it may run cooler.

 

I am leary of the new YZ's.  A lot of reviewers say that the front end is very light until you start picking up a lot speed and riding harder.  Not sure how that would work out on slower trails.  Don't think that the YZ would have as good a resale either. 

 

I've talked to a few different dealers and they have all said "The new YZ isn't a good candidate for a trail bike conversion."  Of course... that's what Yamaha WANTS them to say but I tend to believe it.  The new WR is a pretty potent trail bike anyway, it's not like the WR's of old that were significantly heavier and corked up compared to the YZ.  With the GYT-R exhaust and computer the EFI WR is a pretty dang capable off-road bike.  I think some YZ cams would get the power delivery more to my liking and would make me one happy dude.  But... I still don't want e-start or the weight penalty it brings (even though you don't feel that weight when riding the new WR), so I'm kind of looking at going green for my next bike.



  • woods-rider

Posted November 27, 2013 - 12:12 PM

#8

it's not like the WR's of old that were significantly heavier and corked up compared to the YZ.

 

The 12+ WR450s weight virtually the same as the previous two generations of WR450s (it actually gained 6 lbs in 2012 coming in at 273 lbs).

 

http://www.yamahamot...10/0/specs.aspx


Edited by woods-rider, November 27, 2013 - 12:17 PM.


  • cowboyona426

Posted November 27, 2013 - 09:39 PM

#9

The 12+ WR450s weight virtually the same as the previous two generations of WR450s (it actually gained 6 lbs in 2012 coming in at 273 lbs).

 

http://www.yamahamot...10/0/specs.aspx

 

Yeah I didn't say that right at all... yes the 12+ WR is still heavy compared to a YZ but they uncork easy, then the performance is pretty close to that of the YZ.  The older bikes were heavy AND more difficult to open up.  The nice thing about the 12+ WR is  you don't feel the weight when you're riding it. 



  • MidlifeCrisisGuy

Posted November 28, 2013 - 11:53 AM

#10

But... I still don't want e-start or the weight penalty it brings (even though you don't feel that weight when riding the new WR), so I'm kind of looking at going green for my next bike.


Its very easy (and cheap) to drop 20 pounds off the WR. In its lightened form, its an awesome bike.

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  • waltersobchak

Posted November 28, 2013 - 08:24 PM

#11

The WR is what you are going to want. It is heavier than the YZ, but you gain so many convenience features: kick stand, o-ring chain, steel sprockets, electric start.

  • cowboyona426

Posted November 28, 2013 - 09:34 PM

#12

Its very easy (and cheap) to drop 20 pounds off the WR. In its lightened form, its an awesome bike.

 

I read your thread but it seems like an awful lot of effort for a lot of little gains.  Sure, they all add up but good grief.  Plus, I'm never going to want to cut my bars down or do some of the other things you did just to save a few ounces.

If I could get my hands on all the parts I want at the right prices I'd be looking at doing something totally different than just shaving weight off the EFI WR.



  • YamaLink

Posted November 29, 2013 - 05:10 AM

#13

The electric start is worth its weight in gold especially for your needs.



  • WR 911

Posted November 30, 2013 - 01:10 PM

#14

The YZ is a good track bike but not so good on the trail compared to the WR. The WR can do both if you set it up properly.

Attached Thumbnails

  • wr step up.jpg


  • Navaho6

Posted November 30, 2013 - 05:01 PM

#15

If you are riding wide open trails and are a very skilled rider, consider a YZ.  Dan Milner won the AORC on a '13 YZ250F,

 

http://www.enduro21....3-aorc-champion



  • Krannie McKranface

Posted November 30, 2013 - 05:18 PM

#16

One is made for riding as hard as you can, and the other one is not.

 

You pick.



  • WR 911

Posted November 30, 2013 - 09:48 PM

#17

I ride my WR just as hard as my KX but there is no way my KX can keep up with the WR in the desert. Track bikes are made for the track and trail bikes are made for the trail, just that simple, but the WR is more universal. Are you a pro and have thousands of dollars to set up a bike for off road that was originally built for the track?



  • 080

Posted December 01, 2013 - 08:36 AM

#18

IMO, the 12'+ Wr's are a better choice for offroad riding and racing. You can add to the bike for dual sporting purposes or subtract from the bike and have it every bit as race ready as the Yz.



  • MyersAvionics

Posted December 01, 2013 - 11:08 AM

#19

I have a 2013 WR450 and i raced it this year's Moose Run in IL. It was a last minute decision since my race bike (2-stroke) that i was going to use had some issues and wouldn't be ready. Had to break the new WR in in the mud and didn't get the suspension set up so i was a bit hesitant to even race it.

 

Decided to give it a  go and the WR is super easy to get used to (at race day it had 6miles on it : /). Only down side is i didn't get the GYTR exhaust and i used the stock (uncorked a bit) pipe, but the thing is SUPER quiet. When i had another bike near me i couldn't even hear mine. Then each time i saw my pit help i would set the suspension a bit more... also had to completely stop at one point and adjust the chain because it naturally stretched a bit : P. 

 

If you're going to mainly use it for trail riding, the thing is superb! It took a bit to get used to coming off a light 2-stroke, but the usable power on the thing is really nice. With the newer models it really feels nimble. I'm not sure of your riding style, but i really softened up the shock. With it stock if i was going over a larger log at speed the back end really liked to buck. 

 

Overall for riding it in a VERY tough year in the moose run (Jeff Fredette didn't even finish a lap) i was very surprised with it. 

 

I unfortunately ended up cracking a rib and then getting caught behind some riders so didn't fare too well either. I think i ended up just inside the top 10 in the open B class.... but i also didn't even finish a complete lap of the two lap race. I wish i had a camera on me while racing. I got to a very tough section just before checkpoint 3 (~half a lap in) and there were about 7-10 bikes BURIED and abandoned. The water and mud was about thigh height with a very steep hill on the other side of the creek. Most bikes were stuck beyond hope in the ruts on the other side. Some how I was able to wheelie through and up the hill and made it through without any issues. Offer me a billion dollars to do that again and i'd never be able to. 

 

Either way, i think you'd really be impressed with the newer WR's (After opening it up). 



  • MidlifeCrisisGuy

Posted December 02, 2013 - 08:46 AM

#20

I read your thread but it seems like an awful lot of effort for a lot of little gains.  Sure, they all add up but good grief.

Good grief ? It sure didn't take long to make those changes to my bike. I did a little bit the night before each ride and a month later it was done. Plus, I've outlined what to do, so there is very little guess work.

Furthermore, its way less work to lighten a WR than it is to get a YZ ready for woods. The YZ suspension is going to need a complete revalve and I'd need a WR transmission for sure.

If you do buy a YZ, be sure to reroute the valve cover breather into the air box so that if you ford a deep stream and stall it, it doesn't suck water into the engine.

 

Plus, I'm never going to want to cut my bars down or do some of the other things you did just to save a few ounces.

I didn't cut my bars to save weight. I cut my bars because we ride in TIGHT trees and there were lots of situations where the stock bars were too wide.
 

If I could get my hands on all the parts I want at the right prices I'd be looking at doing something totally different than just shaving weight off the EFI WR.


I'd love to hear what you would do. I'm always looking for ways to improve my WR.

Edited by MidlifeCrisisGuy, December 02, 2013 - 08:52 AM.






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