Blew a fork seal on my 2012....argggg. Good brand?


30 replies to this topic
  • Ride-n-Hard

Posted November 09, 2013 - 05:52 PM

#1

So my low hour trail riding 2012 wr has a leaking front fork seal. I'm out camping and riding as I type this. I made a seal clean out tool out of a plastic cup. I was able to clean a lot of dirt out but it still leaks. So I guess I get to replace both seals as well as dust seals.

So what's a good brand of parts? I guess I don't need to get into the inner cartridge on the SSS type forks so hopefully changing seals won't be too hard.

  • Bandit9

Posted November 09, 2013 - 06:49 PM

#2

Stock is good. On a side note, Don't matter what brand you buy, if you don't clean them, they will leak.

Risk Racing sells an awesome fork seal cleaning tool.

  • mch

Posted November 09, 2013 - 07:38 PM

#3

I had one go out on me pretty quick on my 12 WR.  It seems I didn't have the axle all lined up and a small portion of the left side (if you are looking at it / the speedometer cable is on) wasn't flush with the bottom fork clam housing.  For some reason, getting the axle in is just a major pain in the ass on my WR.  I end up unbolting the brake assembly to keep it out of the way when putting the wheel back on.

 

I took my whole forks apart (not the inner chamber) to do them, but there is a pretty fast way my friends described and turns it into a 15 minute job.  In the efvent yu haven't done one of these before or other readers are interested, here's how to do fork seals (I was trying to find a good you tube video, but no luck).

 

Get a  Home Depot type 5 gallon bucket with a lid.  Cut some slices in the center of the lid so when you push the top of the fork down into it, it supports the fork.  The bucket should be on the ground, and the bottom of the fork pointing up.

 

Loosen the bottom fork nut until it just spins (it won't come out).  I use the handle of a ratchet or the axle (sticking it into the axle hole) to push down on the outter assembly.  You then need to lock the inner assembly (picture below).  Once locked, put a wrench on the middle portion of what is sticking out (there is a flat spot for a wrench - In the picture it's where the dull piece meets the shiny bottom piece) and then get a sockt or wrench on the very bottom piece and loosen the piece on the very bottom, not moving the part you have wrenched.

ForkHoldingTool.jpg

Once you remove that lower piece and the retaining spring that holds the fork seal, you can just pull the lower fork leg housing off and replace the seals as normal.  Guestimate how much the fork seals leaked and add a little bit of fork oil or dump it out and measure the listed amount.  I'm sure some people think it's real important to be exact, but it looks like the oil in that portion is just general lubrication and won't affect valving performance like with the older style (non-twin chamber) forks.  The picture I used was a standard holder tool; I like the motion-pro tool that is the wrench for the top (even though you do not need to remove it using this method) and includes the slot to lock the assembly.  Make sure there are no burs on the portion of the fork that slides on the seals, and I'd recommend using something like a sandwhich bag on the sharp portion of the lower fork tube to slide the seals over (Help prevent cutting the seals on the forks).

 

ForkCapWrench.jpg

Also, a seal installer makes your job way easier.

 

ForkSealDriver.jpg


Edited by mch, November 09, 2013 - 07:46 PM.


  • Krannie McKranface

Posted November 09, 2013 - 08:19 PM

#4

SKF fork seals are the ones you want.

 

I'll bet it was the seal on the right fork.....



  • Monk

Posted November 09, 2013 - 08:29 PM

#5

Krannie is right....SKF make the best in the business, pay a little more up front now, save a lot down the road later!



  • Ride-n-Hard

Posted November 09, 2013 - 11:34 PM

#6

Mines on the brake side. I'm sure the pads are now shot as well from the oil soaking in. There was no front braking action by the time I got back from a ride. I doubt sanding the pads will help.

Thanks for the great tips all.

  • GuyGraham

Posted November 10, 2013 - 12:43 AM

#7

you need this

 

 

It really does work - I replaced 3 seals in a matter months coz of leaks, but this tool has 're-sealed' leaky seals about 5 times since

Your seals very very very rarely wear out - more likely a bit of dirt trapped between seal lip and fork stanchion



  • JDLowrance

Posted November 10, 2013 - 01:02 PM

#8

Actually these work waaayyyy better.

 

http://www.riskracin...octor_Page.html



  • JDLowrance

Posted November 10, 2013 - 01:03 PM

#9

  • If your brake pads got contaminated with oil you need to replace them...don't try to clean them with brake cleaner. And obviously goes without saying....clean rotor thouroughly.


  • dirtracker

Posted November 10, 2013 - 01:18 PM

#10

Stock is good. On a side note, Don't matter what brand you buy, if you don't clean them, they will leak.

Risk Racing sells an awesome fork seal cleaning tool.

 

So my low hour trail riding 2012 wr has a leaking front fork seal. I'm out camping and riding as I type this. I made a seal clean out tool out of a plastic cup. I was able to clean a lot of dirt out but it still leaks. So I guess I get to replace both seals as well as dust seals.

So what's a good brand of parts? I guess I don't need to get into the inner cartridge on the SSS type forks so hopefully changing seals won't be too hard.

SKF seals are the best!!!!!



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  • YHGEORGE

Posted November 10, 2013 - 02:32 PM

#11

  • If your brake pads got contaminated with oil you need to replace them...don't try to clean them with brake cleaner. And obviously goes without saying....clean rotor thouroughly.
SOS soap on the rotor will make it like new. At your grocery store.

  • Ride-n-Hard

Posted November 10, 2013 - 03:01 PM

#12

Where's a good place to find skf seals for yami's?

Edited by Ride-n-Hard, November 10, 2013 - 03:36 PM.


  • DrFeelGood

Posted November 11, 2013 - 12:07 PM

#13

Once you get your seals clean, install a couple of these bad boys.  No more seal problems.

seal-savers.jpg



  • Ride-n-Hard

Posted November 11, 2013 - 03:45 PM

#14

I was thinking of trying those.

  • stevethe

Posted November 12, 2013 - 06:27 AM

#15

Once you get your seals clean, install a couple of these bad boys.  No more seal problems.

seal-savers.jpg

Seal savers yes. They will protect your new seals.

My problem has always been a scratch in the fork leg that ruined the seal. Be sure to sand out any scratches or your new seal won't last long.



  • Ride-n-Hard

Posted November 12, 2013 - 09:22 AM

#16

I did a lot of reading last night and not a lot of good things about seal savers out there. Some generic "ok" posts. Seems like they get holes and wear out fast.

 

I ordered skf seals and dust covers from mx-tech. The word is they have multiple wipers in them. I hope so for the cost.



  • redhurricane

Posted November 12, 2013 - 09:27 AM

#17

Long time seal saver user here. I've used SKF, MSR, Tusk, OEM, etc seals and have never noticed much of a difference in the durability of the seal one over the other. Proper cleaning and installation is key, as is fork/axle alignment.

  • grayracer513

Posted November 12, 2013 - 09:52 AM

#18

The current KYB seals are every bit as durable as SKF's.  The advantage of SKF seals is their very low drag on the fork tube (when the tubes are clean), which to the very discriminating rider (or one with a more vivid imagination) can be felt as smoother fork operation.  If you don't buy the KYB seals over the counter at a Yamaha shop, they are a lot cheaper.

 

The two biggest enemies of fork seals are dirt that actually intrudes under them, and anything that dries on the fork tube and is allowed to stay there.  Mud especially, but even water spots can cause enough abrasion to wear the edge on a seal lip.  Keep the fork tubes as clean as practicable during the ride day and you'll have less trouble with them.  Clean under them regularly, too, but I don't recommend hard devices like the tools shown.  I use an ordinary business card torn in half lengthwise, using the exposed fibers of the torn edge to clean out the seal. 



  • 080

Posted November 12, 2013 - 10:57 AM

#19

I did a lot of reading last night and not a lot of good things about seal savers out there. Some generic "ok" posts. Seems like they get holes and wear out fast.

 

They only wear out on the edge where they rub on the plastic fork protector or against stuff on the trail (cactus, tree branches, rocks etc). Our trick out here is to wrap the upper part of the seal saver with electrical tape as its easier/cheaper to replace than the seal saver each time. I'm a big fan of them just for the fact I don't ever have to mess with cleaning the dust covers. That said I haven't had to replace a fork seal since I started using them in 07'.



  • JDLowrance

Posted November 12, 2013 - 11:01 AM

#20

The risk racing tool I posted on is not meant as a maintenance measure....it is menat to clean out dirt from under the hydraulic seal in the event of a leak without time to remedy by disassembling the fork.

 

I've used the Risk Racing seal tool several times with excellent results.

 

And I agree the KYB seals are every bit as good as the SKFs.

 

Another thing, the seal savers are ok but you have to remove them and clean them and the forks after each wet ride or you can damage the forks hard chrome plating. They can actually do more harm than good.


Edited by JDLowrance, November 12, 2013 - 11:05 AM.





 
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