New tires! Unstoppable traction and control

Tires & Wheels Tires Dunlop D803 Trials Tire

39 replies to this topic
  • DR.billZ

Posted November 01, 2013 - 10:45 AM

#21

Because we're tied of idiots!

  • DRS

Posted November 01, 2013 - 12:35 PM

#22

Why do you say that? I was getting into 4th on some of the straighter smoother sections and it felt like I was glued to the trail

hit something hard in 4th gear with 7lb lbs of air in your front and see how that works out for you. just saying...   sure if you are just on a smooth trail it likely won't matter, but then it also won't matter what tires you are running..  again, just saying...    i've seen so many guys jump on that bandwagon before, only to see them back running knobbies a few months and a few rims later as well.  not knocking it, have fun with it.


Edited by DRS, November 01, 2013 - 02:09 PM.


  • hezzdown

Posted November 01, 2013 - 04:12 PM

#23

Because we're tied of idiots!


LOL! Someone needs a little more fiber in their diet.

  • Monk

Posted November 01, 2013 - 04:49 PM

#24

I predict new rims in the future!



  • MrDieselTwitch

Posted November 01, 2013 - 04:52 PM

#25

I predict new rims in the future!


In all honesty, I probably won't run them that low normally. I'm just excited about being able to at this point. But in reality I'll probably end up running 10 psi upfront and five to seven psi in the back

  • Monk

Posted November 01, 2013 - 04:56 PM

#26

In all honesty, I probably won't run them that low normally. I'm just excited about being able to at this point. But in reality I'll probably end up running 10 psi upfront and five to seven psi in the back

 

I have never tried running low tires.....too scared.


Edited by originalmonk, November 01, 2013 - 04:57 PM.


  • hezzdown

Posted November 01, 2013 - 05:32 PM

#27

I know guys here that run tubliss in knobbies with pretty low psi. 8 in the rear and 6-7 up front. I'm not sold on the tubliss. I run knobbies/HD tubes and depending on terrain run as low as 12 (low speed single track) and as high as 15 (rocks and high speed).

  • MrDieselTwitch

Posted November 02, 2013 - 09:24 AM

#28

I know guys here that run tubliss in knobbies with pretty low psi. 8 in the rear and 6-7 up front. I'm not sold on the tubliss. I run knobbies/HD tubes and depending on terrain run as low as 12 (low speed single track) and as high as 15 (rocks and high speed).

 

I was on the wall my self. I went back and forth on the the three major tubeless systems: The Bib, The Balls and the Trubliss systems. I chose the Trubliss system for a few reasons

 

1. Its the only tubeless system that lets you adjust pressures quickly, with both the bib and balls you're stuck with what you get.

2. It locks the tire on to the rim over the entire circumference of the of the wheel

3. Allows for run flats

4. Doesn't lose its effectiveness over time as the Balls and Bib does

5. No Speed limit, The balls and bib heat up over time athigh speed

6. Quick easy flat repair on the trail

7. 100% eliminates pinch flats. The bibs and balls also do this

8. Cheaper then the bib and balls by about 30-40%

 

 

It does have two disadvantages; I'm sure there are more but these are the two I can think of.

1. Major learning curve to get on the first time. especially with trials tires. We stalled the tire machine at Discount trying to get the front on. In the end took 2 guys a heat gun and the longest tire bars I could find to get it on.

2. Softer tires are more prone to poking flats.

 

 

I also ran HD tubes, they worked well, However at lower pressures they can still be subject to pinch flats are a major pain in the but on the trail if they do pop.

 

it really depends on what, where and how you ride.


Edited by MrDieselTwitch, November 02, 2013 - 09:26 AM.


  • revyrider

Posted November 02, 2013 - 09:37 AM

#29

I run a Pirelli mt23 with 8-9 psi on the rear of my WR450 on the rooty/rocky single track around here & love it!           



  • MrDieselTwitch

Posted November 02, 2013 - 09:42 AM

#30

I run a Pirelli mt23 with 8-9 psi on the rear of my WR450 on the rooty/rocky single track around here & love it!           

 

I was just thinking 8 PSI might be a safer pressure to run. A good balance between traction and protection for the rim.

 

What are you running in the front?



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  • brent j

Posted November 02, 2013 - 06:26 PM

#31

I'm running the original Dunlop trials tires on my Freeride. I've ridden one with knobbies and it doesn't suit me or my riding.

 

We ride in hot, dry, rocky conditions. I run about 10psi in the back and 13 in the front. On long or faster rides I'll add two-three psi to both.

My suspension has been re-sprung and re-valved for traction, comfort and compliance and I don't have any trouble with flats. i run heaps of baby powered on my tubes/inside tires and find this helps.

 

A few of my mates have run the "tubliss" set up and have fond they get pinch flats on the bead lock. The advantage is being able to fix the flats in place.

 

I'm really looking forward to trying the new MAXXIS Trial-Maxx tires when they come available



  • revyrider

Posted November 03, 2013 - 07:22 AM

#32

Currently running Pirelli mt21 9psi. Both tires are DOT as my bike is plated!



  • Zimman

Posted November 03, 2013 - 07:40 AM

#33

Oh gees. "dampner"/ "dampener". Its.......................DAMPER :)

If you dampen something you make it wet. If you damp something you slow it down.

what if you damnper ?



  • Monk

Posted November 03, 2013 - 08:04 AM

#34

what if you damnper ?


Or dapner?

  • hezzdown

Posted November 03, 2013 - 10:33 AM

#35

Shhhh guys! You're gonna send billZ in to a nervous break down!!

  • Zimman

Posted November 03, 2013 - 10:46 AM

#36

Or dapner?

I have been a DAPner

 

retail_cat_photo.gif

 

if that is a person Who applies DAP products  LOL



  • Betarocker

Posted November 03, 2013 - 11:03 AM

#37

Damper when used as an adjective refers to having water content.

Damper when used as a noun is a mechanism to control a dulling or deadening of vibrations or oscillations influences on a mechanism

Dampen when used as an intransitive verb is to diminish progressively in vibration or oscillation.

 

When comparing a damper (noun), it is either more or less damp. 


Edited by Betarocker, November 03, 2013 - 11:08 AM.


  • wallrat

Posted November 04, 2013 - 06:50 AM

#38

I love a trials tire rear but the front is too mushy I find.  I'm running a MT-43 in the back and a Kenda Parker DT up front with 10psi on both on Tubeliss.  Took me a lot of tries to find a front tire I really like.  This is a really good combo for dry terrain and I'd even give it a B+ in sand.

 

Also in case you haven't done it yet, watch out on steep/loose descents.  The rear trials tires are pretty interesting - you end up sorta racing your ass end down the hill trying to keep it behind you.



  • Ud_Luz

Posted November 08, 2013 - 10:44 AM

#39

In all honesty, I probably won't run them that low normally. I'm just excited about being able to at this point. But in reality I'll probably end up running 10 psi upfront and five to seven psi in the back

I've been using trials tires for 15 years. If there's any rocks run 10 in the back. Also you can pinch the sidewalls at very low pressures which makes the Tubliss system worthless at that point since you're now stranded. I'll trade a bit of traction for less of a chance of failure.

 

I'm conflicted on front trials tires. Awesome in rocks, like riding on ice if you happen to be on grass. Rear trials is OK in sand, front not nearly so.



  • Rotax

Posted November 10, 2013 - 06:05 PM

#40

Dampner is not on any auto correct. It isn't a word. No, we live in a world of people that can't spell nor learn by simple observation.

 

A dampner is a hydraulic device used to reduce pulsations in a hydraulic system. 
This differs from a damper which is a hydraulic device used to damp vibrations in a physical system that the hydraulics are connected to.
A Pulsation Dampner is used in a piping system, generally adjacent to the source of the flow or pressure disturbance, which is typically a modulating element like a pump or a flow control valve. Being a plumber, I work with these weekly. 






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