Racer X Rapid Reaxtion post-"shootout" YZ450F



26 replies to this topic
  • motoscotty

Posted November 03, 2013 - 04:34 PM

#21

Just try running your sag at 112 or even more, I know it sounds crazy cause that is what I was thinking when it was suggested, this bike works well with lotsa sag!
Win all the testing we did with sag #'s I found the bike way way high in the rear at 100 and kicking violently.

I found there to be an area between 104-108mm where the front end started pushing, then thinking outside the box we tried 110 which I thought was nuts, it was way better so we went to 112 and it got even better ans was starting to carve so we went to 114 and by now we had lowered the rear an inch and a half.
Traction became way better under acceleration and braking and cornering became so easy.

All we have done with the forks is raise them 8mm to level out the bike sue to the lower rear.


I am currently runnin 116 mm now and using a 6.3 shock spring which allows the excessive sag but still supports me
With both wheels sitting on the ground the tip of rear fender is 38-5/8" above the ground, stock it was over 40.

This bike reacts so differently to adjustments unlike any other I have owned, I have no idea why 116mm makes the bike corner so much better, don't be afraid to think outside the box!

I've gained a few over the last few weeks due to my birthday but currently 210 lbs and running stock fork springs and a 6.3 rear spring.

As far as the rest of the bike it is bullet proof like any other Yamaha, power is unreal on this bike.
I have not touched the mapping and have a 4.1 slip on which I'm not at all impressed with (it was free thank god!)
Currently I'm running the stock silencer

Feel tree to hit me up with any questions.

  • motoxjeff

Posted November 03, 2013 - 06:58 PM

#22

Just try running your sag at 112 or even more, I know it sounds crazy cause that is what I was thinking when it was suggested, this bike works well with lotsa sag!
Win all the testing we did with sag #'s I found the bike way way high in the rear at 100 and kicking violently.

I found there to be an area between 104-108mm where the front end started pushing, then thinking outside the box we tried 110 which I thought was nuts, it was way better so we went to 112 and it got even better ans was starting to carve so we went to 114 and by now we had lowered the rear an inch and a half.
Traction became way better under acceleration and braking and cornering became so easy.

All we have done with the forks is raise them 8mm to level out the bike sue to the lower rear.


I am currently runnin 116 mm now and using a 6.3 shock spring which allows the excessive sag but still supports me
With both wheels sitting on the ground the tip of rear fender is 38-5/8" above the ground, stock it was over 40.

This bike reacts so differently to adjustments unlike any other I have owned, I have no idea why 116mm makes the bike corner so much better, don't be afraid to think outside the box!

I've gained a few over the last few weeks due to my birthday but currently 210 lbs and running stock fork springs and a 6.3 rear spring.

As far as the rest of the bike it is bullet proof like any other Yamaha, power is unreal on this bike.
I have not touched the mapping and have a 4.1 slip on which I'm not at all impressed with (it was free thank god!)
Currently I'm running the stock silencer

Feel tree to hit me up with any questions.

First of all thank you for taking the time to write this up. 

 

"I found there to be an area between 104-108mm where the front end started pushing, then thinking outside the box we tried 110 which I thought was nuts, it was way better so we went to 112 and it got even better ans was starting to carve so we went to 114 and by now we had lowered the rear an inch and a half."

 

​So my question to you, is buying a lowering link an easier way to fix the solution with more sag?  If the bike is going to be lowered, would it not be better to just get the link?  

 

My buddy was saying that Ride Engineering will be coming out with triple clamps to reduce offset (I believe stock is 22, and Ride will come out with a 20, or 21).  This is also a possibility that I'm looking at.

 

​Thinking about getting a braking Wave rotor up front?  I already have a steel braided line up front….thoughts on that?

 

It seems like I get a new bike every year (I came off of a '13 CRF 450 last year, and Im just used to that thing carving a corner/ rut).  The only thing I really want to look at is the front end push I was experiencing (I also switched the front to a B-stone 203).  The motor would just STOMP a CRF, or any other bike for that matter…I'm really happy as far as thats concerned.

 

Thanks again for taking the time.

Jeff



  • motoscotty

Posted November 03, 2013 - 07:43 PM

#23

First of all thank you for taking the time to write this up. 

 

"I found there to be an area between 104-108mm where the front end started pushing, then thinking outside the box we tried 110 which I thought was nuts, it was way better so we went to 112 and it got even better ans was starting to carve so we went to 114 and by now we had lowered the rear an inch and a half."

 

​So my question to you, is buying a lowering link an easier way to fix the solution with more sag?  If the bike is going to be lowered, would it not be better to just get the link?  

 

My buddy was saying that Ride Engineering will be coming out with triple clamps to reduce offset (I believe stock is 22, and Ride will come out with a 20, or 21).  This is also a possibility that I'm looking at.

 

​Thinking about getting a braking Wave rotor up front?  I already have a steel braided line up front….thoughts on that?

 

It seems like I get a new bike every year (I came off of a '13 CRF 450 last year, and Im just used to that thing carving a corner/ rut).  The only thing I really want to look at is the front end push I was experiencing (I also switched the front to a B-stone 203).  The motor would just STOMP a CRF, or any other bike for that matter…I'm really happy as far as thats concerned.

 

Thanks again for taking the time.

Jeff

Jeff-

 

I tried the link and felt it did not have the same effect as my current set up, nor feel as stable as the super sag. Maybe cause the link changes the angle of the shock??

I have a link laying in the garage you can try for your self if you'd like.

 

I don't think it's a clamp issue, the ass end is just way too high,

 

I think the front brake could use an oversize rotor definitely.



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  • zeuszuki

Posted November 03, 2013 - 08:08 PM

#24

If you have a US spec YZ then by all means try 'motoscotty' recommendations.

The euro spec is quite different and does not work with that spec ( I tried it )

Euro:
First set your sag 102-108mm , no more than 108mm max, then push your forks up through the clamps 3-5mm depending on how fast the track is. NB: taking too much compression out of the forks makes the bike unstable, this chassis responds well to a firmer compression set up ( more than the ,10-13 model here in euro )

That will get you started.

  • YamahaNZguy

Posted November 06, 2013 - 04:01 PM

#25

If you have a US spec YZ then by all means try 'motoscotty' recommendations.

The euro spec is quite different and does not work with that spec ( I tried it )

Euro:
First set your sag 102-108mm , no more than 108mm max, then push your forks up through the clamps 3-5mm depending on how fast the track is. NB: taking too much compression out of the forks makes the bike unstable, this chassis responds well to a firmer compression set up ( more than the ,10-13 model here in euro )

That will get you started.

Totally agree with you on the differences with the euro spec & US spec, I'm not on the 14 yet but have experienced this with the 10-13's.

Have you done/tried anything else with your 14 such as the link, which apparently the 10-13 link bolts up to the 14 as well.

Myself and another racer have done more testing than we care to admit on these bikes and its always good to hear real world opinions from others.



  • zeuszuki

Posted November 06, 2013 - 11:43 PM

#26

Totally agree with you on the differences with the euro spec & US spec, I'm not on the 14 yet but have experienced this with the 10-13's.
Have you done/tried anything else with your 14 such as the link, which apparently the 10-13 link bolts up to the 14 as well.
Myself and another racer have done more testing than we care to admit on these bikes and its always good to hear real world opinions from others.

First off - I am a B grade rider on a good day but have a couple of National road race titles and am good at suspension set up.
My '11 specs
Some must do's if you are reading this;
1: Chassis- grease all linkages , swingarm pivot etc before you start and replace any worn parts.Everything needs to be in top condition.
2: Chassis- torque all bolts to manufacturer spec' , this is important for correct chassis performance.

Motor- I ran an enhanced woods map to reduce the 'hit' , this helps with hook up.

Forks- always rebuild using 'S1' fork oil or one with an identical CST rating. I ran the std 4.6N/mm springs with 365cc of oil per leg. The springs were a little bit light for my weight but were close, the extra oil sorted it.Forks flush with the triple clamps ( I ran the rear a little high ).

Rear end- rebuilt shock and revalved to increase rebound slightly . stock spring 56N/mm , sag 100 - 105mm depending on circuit. I ran the rear a little high to aid turn in, the draw backs kicked a little on the face of jumps and you had to weight the rear to help with traction but that is a '10-'13 trait anyway. LSC 10 clicks out , HSC 1 turn out , REB 15 clicks out ( revalved).

Bar position- front mount holes, rear orientation on clamps ( bars line up with fork cap center line ).

The bike worked very well and everyone who rode it commented on how well it handled, plenty of them owned '11-'13 Yz's. I 'tweaked' a few of them to.

Did I miss anything?

Yes, I did. Run the rear wheel right back in the swingarm, the extra leverage assists traction.

It was an awesome bike, my '14 is a different beast for sure.
Rode '11 Yz and '12 Wr with a link - really good for hook up and less lively in the rough, worked better on the Wr than the Yz. I put it down to chassis dynamics eg: the Wr is essentially a 450 in a 250f chassis, while it dulled the steering input a bit it was still acceptable . With the new chassis on the '14 it may actually work well but TBH I am happy with progress on this bike so far, its a very good package out of the box.

This is all my personal experience and opinion, others may differ.

Edited by zeuszuki, November 07, 2013 - 09:26 PM.


  • sir speedy

Posted November 14, 2013 - 09:56 PM

#27

I have my 13 CRF450 for sale - sticking with my 2010 YZ450F. Feel more comfortable with it. Its also more fun to ride.







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