2011 YZ450 Frame Cracked :/



18 replies to this topic
  • swaldrop

Posted August 03, 2013 - 01:23 PM

#1

I know that this has been discussed and has happened to quite a few others, but if there is anyone out there that had a similar issue and can offer advice on what I should do with my own cracked frame, I would certainly appreciate it.

 

From what I can tell, the weld looks to have been cracked for a while as you can see that the stress has now started to crack the down tube itself. I feel pretty lucky to have noticed it now, even though it's possibly way too late to repair. A couple of hard hits and it may have let go completely and snapped in half. 

 

The bike just passed 100 hours and like I said, I assume the weld has been cracked for a while now. I like to think that I take great care of my bikes. I weigh about 180, ride at about an average vet B pace on pretty much exclusively sand tracks. 

 

Here's a pic...

 

frame_cracks.jpg

 

Can this be welded?

 

Any chance Yamaha has recognized the problem and would be willing to help out?

 

If I am to replace it, any idea where I could source one for cheap?

 

I was just going over the pros and cons of buying a new '14. Guess I waited too long to make a decision :/ Anyone want a 2011 for cheap???

 

Thanks and let me know if anyone has any info.

Steve

 

 

 



  • KJ790

Posted August 03, 2013 - 01:32 PM

#2

Last year I bought a 2010 that came with a crack that looked exactly like that. Same weld, same side, same length and everything. I ground it out, welded it, and ran it without any issue so far.

 

One question, what do you use as soap when you wash your bike?



  • mrjata

Posted August 03, 2013 - 03:17 PM

#3

very poor weld!  That is called "hot cracking" and should be fixed by Yamaha.  The weld was performed at to hot a heat range.  It is most definitely fixable but you need to go beyond the stressed area.  A gusset wouldn't be a bad idea either.



  • swaldrop

Posted August 03, 2013 - 04:25 PM

#4

One question, what do you use as soap when you wash your bike?


I use Simple Green. Is that a problem you think?

  • SAthump

Posted August 03, 2013 - 04:46 PM

#5

No simple green didn't cause the crack or make or more susceptible .

Most likely bolt torques were not regularly check and or headset bearings!

  • swaldrop

Posted August 03, 2013 - 04:54 PM

#6

No simple green didn't cause the crack or make or more susceptible .

Most likely bolt torques were not regularly check and or headset bearings!


Yeah, I would be surprised to find out Simple Green had any effect. No loose bolts and headset bearings are good. I did move the motor up with the Dr D. Motor mod though. I suppose that could have possibly placed more stress in that area?

  • mrjata

Posted August 03, 2013 - 05:08 PM

#7

I am sticking with the pathetic weld.  Look at the chill lines, and what is with that "gob" at the bottom of the weld?  Jeez!  Looks like worse than a freshman weld.  I would make Yamaha fix it.  Contact corporate Yamaha and then Miller Welding for credibility and weld consultation.



  • KJ790

Posted August 03, 2013 - 05:09 PM

#8

Since I have seen 4 cracked frames on '10-'13 YZ450F's, and all of them were on the same weld, it seems as though it is something to do with that particular weld or the forces that the frame projects on that weld. Since the first 3 I had seen had all been washed with very caustic soaps for their entire life, I had a theory that it may be related. I know that liquids can seep into welds and if it is a caustic liquid, this will sit in the weld and slowly eat away from the inside out. It is debatable how damaging simple green is to aluminum, I think it tends to be one of the less aggressive cleaners though.

 

Though as I said before, since all of them have been failures at the same weld, I now think that it is an issue with the frame itself.



  • swaldrop

Posted August 03, 2013 - 05:58 PM

#9

I never learned to weld, yet I have always wanted to. That being said, this could simply be a case of a bad weld, but I tend to agree with KJ790 and believe it to be a design flaw. That area probably needs gussets or a better / different mating surface design in order to better distribute the load. It just doesn't seem like the weld's fault as much as it does the way the two pieces are joined and the amount of stress is has to endure.

 

Again, I have no idea what I am talking about either. Just an observation. Either way, with the frequency that this exact area fails, it would be nice for Yamaha to step up. I highly doubt they will though.


Edited by swaldrop, August 03, 2013 - 06:01 PM.


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  • swaldrop

Posted August 07, 2013 - 08:46 PM

#10

UPDATE: Fixed!

I have a buddy of mine who just happens to be a welder by trade. When he saw the pic I posted he was sure he could fix it. Below is what he was able to do...

 

frame_fixed.jpg

 

I'm no expert but I think he did a pretty good job. 

 

Now, if I can just figure out how to get this thing back together, I'll be set!


Edited by swaldrop, August 07, 2013 - 08:47 PM.


  • mrjata

Posted August 09, 2013 - 07:51 PM

#11

The inside weld is just right, he did fine by you.  Outside looks professional all the way.  This is how you weld aluminum.   Pay attention, Yamaha! (and New Holland)



  • swaldrop

Posted August 13, 2013 - 09:30 AM

#12

The inside weld is just right, he did fine by you.  Outside looks professional all the way.  This is how you weld aluminum.   Pay attention, Yamaha! (and New Holland)

Good to hear. I rode the bike on Sunday and was not gentle on the bike by any means. Everything help up perfectly. Pretty happy I was able to get it fixed as quickly as I did. 



  • mrjata

Posted August 13, 2013 - 10:35 AM

#13

Didn't take him long to do it either, did it?  Took longer to prep the area.  Looks like wire fed weld.  They are so nice!!  I have to TIG it up.  Take a little longer, harder to do.  That weld should serve you well.  Didn't think it was worth getting your shorts in a knot about.  Now you know.

 

Ride hard, take aspirin, repeat as necessary!



  • swaldrop

Posted August 13, 2013 - 08:26 PM

#14

I stripped it down, took it to his shop and he had it done within about 30 to 45 minutes. If only wrestling that wire harness back in to place was as easy... 



  • SAthump

Posted August 13, 2013 - 09:50 PM

#15

Just curiosity

Was the frame preheated before the welding?

I don't know poop about welding Its Just my understanding that helps.

  • Thaulass

Posted August 14, 2013 - 05:03 AM

#16

Since all these welds are done with automation it could be grade of alum they used, contamination of the weld area or not enough reinforcment in the weld itself. A good shop should be able to grind the weld out preheat the frame and fix it. Make sure you find out what type and grade of aluminum they are welding so they can choose the correct weld wire. PS the preheat removes moisture form the base material.



  • grayracer513

Posted August 14, 2013 - 07:12 AM

#17

I don't think this can be blamed entirely on the weld.  To me it looks as if the joint should have been placed elsewhere and angled differently.  The area apparently flexes more than a certain percentage of the welds can tolerate. 



  • MarkDan

Posted August 17, 2013 - 10:36 PM

#18

I had my frame welded about this time last year, crack was on one side and wasn't the full length of the factory weld, and tore it down to check the welds and do maintenance. Both welds had small cracks in them, I would highly recommend some sort of gusset in there somewhere so it doesn't crack again.



  • jwleonard

Posted August 18, 2013 - 12:34 AM

#19

I was just going over the pros and cons of buying a new '14. Guess I waited too long to make a decision :/ Anyone want a 2011 for cheap???
Steve

Yes, I'll take your 2011 for cheap, especially now that the crack is fixed:D

Edited by jwleonard, August 18, 2013 - 12:35 AM.






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