2008 WR450F WITH YZ SUSPENSION AND CAMS / PART DEUX

Yamaha YZ450F 2008

132 replies to this topic
  • Krannie McKranface

Posted November 13, 2013 - 02:12 PM


Cool, I'm going to try the stock header. 

 

I did a 500 mile 3 day ride in the dez and see what you are talking about. The bike screams in the upper top end but you have to rev it good to shift. This got worse on day 3 in the desert when my air filter was super dirty. on top of that i'm running 15/48 gearing so the the gap between gears is pretty good now. (the ratios are closer for the 03-06 than the 07+ bikes. 

 

Bike has yz cams and a full Ti PC pipe that was on a 03 yz450. I'm not sure if the older pc pipe will slip on to the stock header though. It has no clamp at the joint. I also have a smaller end camp I could use. 

 

I think the port job is in my future but I need to pay for a wedding and house projects first. 

 

This was EXTREMELY noticeable for me with the stock porting and piston and header.

I could loosen the dirty air filter away from the airbox for a street test ride and gain 5 more hp below 6krpm....or of course, clean it....

 

I briefly rode Ken's around the block after his work was done, and it was fine. No issues that needed to be addressed.....but mine does have more power way down low with the added porting, if I can even remember anymore...


Edited by Krannie, November 13, 2013 - 02:14 PM.


  • KennyMc

Posted November 13, 2013 - 03:16 PM


Yep, almost as good as a Rekluse.

Cheater's, every last one of them (you?) :p



  • KennyMc

Posted November 13, 2013 - 03:26 PM


This was EXTREMELY noticeable for me with the stock porting and piston and header.

I could loosen the dirty air filter away from the airbox for a street test ride and gain 5 more hp below 6krpm....or of course, clean it....

 

I briefly rode Ken's around the block after his work was done, and it was fine. No issues that needed to be addressed.....but mine does have more power way down low with the added porting, if I can even remember anymore...

Yeah, it's funny how fairly similar bikes (before your porting) would act so differently.  Don't really know how much the porting on mine affected the performance as it was done in conjunction with the cams and slightly increased comp. piston.  But like you said, I haven't felt the need to address and performance issues.  Just changing the gearing a bit to suit the different ridding terrain.  When I put on the 12 counter sprocket I took out a few links of the chain so my tire wasn't extended all the way back into the adjusters thereby extending the wheel base.  So when I put the 13 back on, I switch out the chain as well.



  • Krannie McKranface

Posted November 13, 2013 - 03:57 PM


14/50 here. 



  • KennyMc

Posted November 13, 2013 - 07:18 PM


14/50 here.

How long you been running that?

  • Krannie McKranface

Posted November 13, 2013 - 08:17 PM


How long you been running that?

Forever. 



  • KennyMc

Posted November 13, 2013 - 10:58 PM


Wowsa. Bad boy must do 110.

  • RockerYZWR

Posted November 14, 2013 - 06:11 AM


In a somewhat related note, I've currently got 14/45 and have topped it out in 5th - not quite bouncing the rev limiter, but damn close - speedo said 112 the last time I looked at it.  I would say going that fast on this bike is not recommended without a stabilizer.  Head shake at that speed is uncool - I don't think I'll miss that top end with the 13/51 I'm gonna go with here shortly.



  • Krannie McKranface

Posted November 14, 2013 - 06:15 AM


Wowsa. Bad boy must do 110.

It stops at about 91 with me on it...

 

My body is not very aerodynamic....

 

fat-guy.jpg



  • Krannie McKranface

Posted November 14, 2013 - 06:24 AM


In a somewhat related note, I've currently got 14/45 and have topped it out in 5th - not quite bouncing the rev limiter, but damn close - speedo said 112 the last time I looked at it.  I would say going that fast on this bike is not recommended without a stabilizer.  Head shake at that speed is uncool - I don't think I'll miss that top end with the 13/51 I'm gonna go with here shortly.

 

I just like the wider power range in 1st, second and third when using 14/50.

I like to be in a gear high most of the time on single track and use a lot of clutch. Zero wheel spin and no rear wheel chatter when you chop the throttle.



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  • KennyMc

Posted November 14, 2013 - 06:31 AM


In a somewhat related note, I've currently got 14/45 and have topped it out in 5th - not quite bouncing the rev limiter, but damn close - speedo said 112 the last time I looked at it. I would say going that fast on this bike is not recommended without a stabilizer. Head shake at that speed is uncool - I don't think I'll miss that top end with the 13/51 I'm gonna go with here shortly.

Yeah, IMO, that gearing is best suited for wider, open terrain which if that is the majority of your riding it's perfect. Kinda the 80/20 rule. Gear it for 80% of the terrain you ride and deal with it the other 20%.

Or if you have multiple counter sprockets, it's pretty quick and easy to make adjustments to make that gap even smaller.

Feathering clutch work is a skill I think is underutilized. Some guys I ride with think that just means pulling it in and letting it out a lot. I guess the way I look at it it is more of a way that just slightly disengages the clutch enough to keep the motor from stalling while allowing you to continue your forward momentum with some added throttle control. This is really in 2 situations, climbing hills and navigating real tight almost trials like trails. That is where having too tall of gearing can bite you in the ass. You will constantly be in the clutch cause as soon as your not, your off like a rocket. It helps smooth out your ride and not be as "herky jerky".

Edited by kenshaw720, November 14, 2013 - 06:36 AM.


  • KennyMc

Posted November 14, 2013 - 06:40 AM


It stops at about 91 with me on it...
 
My body is not very aerodynamic....
 
fat-guy.jpg

Aw, come on, no way, your not that big (I'm not talking about the picture). I hit 92 on a dirt rode, I think on a dry lake bed it would be more. And that's with a 13/49. It would be interesting to see how much the additional drag plays into it.

  • Krannie McKranface

Posted November 14, 2013 - 07:28 AM


Yeah, IMO, that gearing is best suited for wider, open terrain which if that is the majority of your riding it's perfect. Kinda the 80/20 rule. Gear it for 80% of the terrain you ride and deal with it the other 20%.

Or if you have multiple counter sprockets, it's pretty quick and easy to make adjustments to make that gap even smaller.

Feathering clutch work is a skill I think is underutilized. Some guys I ride with think that just means pulling it in and letting it out a lot. I guess the way I look at it it is more of a way that just slightly disengages the clutch enough to keep the motor from stalling while allowing you to continue your forward momentum with some added throttle control. This is really in 2 situations, climbing hills and navigating real tight almost trials like trails. That is where having too tall of gearing can bite you in the ass. You will constantly be in the clutch cause as soon as your not, your off like a rocket. It helps smooth out your ride and not be as "herky jerky".

Yes, my gearing is no good for up hill ledges. I cannot make them.

I have a 12 hanging on a hook in my shop....



  • stevethe

Posted November 14, 2013 - 08:05 AM


Yeah, IMO, that gearing is best suited for wider, open terrain which if that is the majority of your riding it's perfect. Kinda the 80/20 rule. Gear it for 80% of the terrain you ride and deal with it the other 20%.

Or if you have multiple counter sprockets, it's pretty quick and easy to make adjustments to make that gap even smaller.

Feathering clutch work is a skill I think is underutilized. Some guys I ride with think that just means pulling it in and letting it out a lot. I guess the way I look at it it is more of a way that just slightly disengages the clutch enough to keep the motor from stalling while allowing you to continue your forward momentum with some added throttle control. This is really in 2 situations, climbing hills and navigating real tight almost trials like trails. That is where having too tall of gearing can bite you in the ass. You will constantly be in the clutch cause as soon as your not, your off like a rocket. It helps smooth out your ride and not be as "herky jerky".

 

I think your comments on using the clutch are right on. We ride very technical stuff and hill climbs, you have to use your clutch. Sometimes I use the clutch to stop the bike from wheeling and flipping on a hill or to keep it in a higher gear longer up a rocky section. I have worn out a couple of stock clutch cables, however I am still on the stock clutch. I use the stock 13-50 gearing.



  • beezer

Posted November 14, 2013 - 08:19 AM


All our trails are 1rst and 2nd gear with all kinds of trail trash.  We all run stock gearing and just slip the clutch when we have to.

 

It's an acquired skill.  When somebody new comes out they spend a lot of time on a stalled bike.

 

Some of the most fun we have is when we take an MX guy out and count how many times he stalls.



  • MidlifeCrisisGuy

Posted November 14, 2013 - 09:20 AM


Some of the most fun we have is when we take an MX guy out and count how many times he stalls.


Its amazing how much skill trail riding takes and how unique that skill is. I know a guy who teaches street bike riding and yet has a terrible time on trails, especially hills.

  • KennyMc

Posted November 14, 2013 - 10:52 AM


Yeah, you guys hit the nail on the head.  It's all about not stalling the bike in the middle of a hill climb but also not spinning the tire as well as they both pretty much do the same thing.  Stopping momentum.  I love riding technical stuff and working the clutch. I have a couple of friends that ride trials and I am thinking about doing that as well.  Cool stuff to watch and to do but it is more difficult than it seems.



  • beezer

Posted November 14, 2013 - 01:23 PM


I bought a trials bike 2 years ago, rode it twice and sold it.  A motorcycle with no seat is a bad idea.



  • Krannie McKranface

Posted November 14, 2013 - 02:17 PM


Aw, come on, no way, your not that big (I'm not talking about the picture). I hit 92 on a dirt rode, I think on a dry lake bed it would be more. And that's with a 13/49. It would be interesting to see how much the additional drag plays into it.

On pavement I get to about 91 at absolute max 



  • KennyMc

Posted November 14, 2013 - 03:16 PM


I bought a trials bike 2 years ago, rode it twice and sold it.  A motorcycle with no seat is a bad idea.

Yeah, they have there place.  Out here in CA, there are a few clubs that put on events so the opportunites are there.  If you had to make your own time, might be more scarce....







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