Heavier flywheel or change sprocket?


7 replies to this topic
  • CombatYoga

Posted July 10, 2013 - 10:18 AM

#1

I have an '08 450f that I plan to race in some Hare Scrambles events starting this September.
I ride at the MX track with my son as well - that's fairly mellow - no racing, just practice laps.

I do notice that my bike can stall easier than my old 2-stroke in the tight stuff, and I really have to work the clutch.

I've seen recommendations for heavier flywheels, changing the sprocket and even a throttle tamer.

I'd like to hear what some folks on here have done to cut down the stalling on tight trails, both the positives and negatives.

I'm not very interested in a Rekluse, but open to the discussion.

Thanks!

SF

  • grayracer513

Posted July 10, 2013 - 01:20 PM

#2

I'm not very interested in a Rekluse, but open to the discussion.


Thereby ruling out the absolute best option to address the matter. Running a Rekluse is like having a torque converter.

Whether you run a Rekluse or not, add a heavier flywheel on the order of the GYT-R Off-Road (the heavier of the two offered, about 9 ounces heavier than stock) and be certain your pilot circuit is lean enough to slow the idle-down on the carb.

  • CombatYoga

Posted July 10, 2013 - 07:16 PM

#3

Thanks for the info Gray.

I rode a guy's KTM briefly that had a Rekluse and I was not a huge fan.
Call me old fashioned - it must take a little getting used to.

I will look into the flywheel.

Thanks again,

SF

  • grayracer513

Posted July 11, 2013 - 06:53 AM

#4

I rode a guy's KTM briefly that had a Rekluse and I was not a huge fan.
Call me old fashioned - it must take a little getting used to.



It does, and a good part of "getting used to it" is concentrating on leaving the clutch alone and letting it do its job. After so many years of riding motorcycles of just about every kind, and a lot of that off road, I count myself as a fairly highly skilled master of the clutch lever. Nevertheless, it's impossible to do as good a job as the Rekluse does. The nasty stuff is where it really shines. Everybody has those moments when there's too many things going on at once and one's focus is lost for just that moment as the front wheel drops in a hole, or the front end bounces up on a rocky climb. One little mistake and you stall. Not so the Rekluse.

The clutch has prevented me from screwing up like that over and over. It's not entirely perfect, but it comes close. Once, I didn't quite clear a silty climb before the back dug in to deep to continue. I stepped off to the right side, threw a finger over the brake lever, and pulled up and forward on the rear fender with my left hand while I applied throttle with the right, neatly extracting the bike from its burrow, remounted and rode on. Try that without an auto clutch.

I'd say it takes a good 8 hours time to get reasonably comfortable with the thing, and no, it's not for everybody. I would not use one on an MX bike, only because I wouldn't have a reason to, but off-road? Definitely.

Even with that, the heavier flywheel will always be a benefit. It smooths out the low speed operation of the engine to the point that it can actually pull slightly harder at very low speeds than it can without it, and it does help keep the fire lit.

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  • Gunner354

Posted July 11, 2013 - 10:50 AM

#5

It does, and a good part of "getting used to it" is concentrating on leaving the clutch alone and letting it do its job. After so many years of riding motorcycles of just about every kind, and a lot of that off road, I count myself as a fairly highly skilled master of the clutch lever. Nevertheless, it's impossible to do as good a job as the Rekluse does. The nasty stuff is where it really shines. Everybody has those moments when there's too many things going on at once and one's focus is lost for just that moment as the front wheel drops in a hole, or the front end bounces up on a rocky climb. One little mistake and you stall. Not so the Rekluse.

The clutch has prevented me from screwing up like that over and over. It's not entirely perfect, but it comes close. Once, I didn't quite clear a silty climb before the back dug in to deep to continue. I stepped off to the right side, threw a finger over the brake lever, and pulled up and forward on the rear fender with my left hand while I applied throttle with the right, neatly extracting the bike from its burrow, remounted and rode on. Try that without an auto clutch.

I'd say it takes a good 8 hours time to get reasonably comfortable with the thing, and no, it's not for everybody. I would not use one on an MX bike, only because I wouldn't have a reason to, but off-road? Definitely.

Even with that, the heavier flywheel will always be a benefit. It smooths out the low speed operation of the engine to the point that it can actually pull slightly harder at very low speeds than it can without it, and it does help keep the fire lit.

It is beneficial in a motocross scenario for the simple fact of no stalling especially after a crash.

  • YZPaGuy

Posted July 11, 2013 - 12:27 PM

#6

All three options are on my 08 for Hare Scrambles in the east. I love all of them. The G2 throttle cam does nothing for stalling, just allow more throttle control in the tight stuff.

The flywheel is the one of the three best things I have ever done to my bike. It is awesome!

Sprokets help but it isn't like the fly wheel. Flywheel first IMO!

  • FRANTIK1

Posted July 13, 2013 - 07:25 PM

#7

I run a GYTR off road flywheel on my 09 and have not stalled it since installing. I also run a 06 CDI and 12/50 gearing. The thing rocks in tight stuff. Keeps me off the clutch, lugs well, and is snappy when needed. And if I want, I can swap out the countershaft sprocket to a 13t quick and easy.

Edited by FRANTIK1, July 13, 2013 - 07:28 PM.


  • CombatYoga

Posted July 14, 2013 - 06:58 PM

#8

Fantastic information everyone - I appreciate the knowledge dump! Thanks so much.
Definitely going to get the flywheel.

SF





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