YZF 45O 2010 WHAT FROUNT TIRES DO YOU RECOMEND


12 replies to this topic
  • YZF MAD

Posted May 29, 2013 - 02:09 AM

#1

Trying do get bike to turn better in corners.My cornering speed is rubbish bike seems to push me out wide.have lowered forks.I really like the bike jumps brilliantly.But if i cant fix problem.Thinking about going back to a yz250 2 stroke. CHEERS!!

  • Roger Ramjet

Posted May 29, 2013 - 06:41 AM

#2

Trying do get bike to turn better in corners.My cornering speed is rubbish bike seems to push me out wide.have lowered forks.I really like the bike jumps brilliantly.But if i cant fix problem.Thinking about going back to a yz250 2 stroke. CHEERS!!


You want to move the fork tubes up in the triple clamp. I've moved mine approx 7mm above std. Made a massive difference in cornering. Just keep in mind it won't handle as well on long straights, top gear.

Also play around with your rebound in the forks. Try the fork leg height first, then try your clickers on the rebound.

As for tyres, Dunlop Geomax 51.

  • grayracer513

Posted May 29, 2013 - 06:55 AM

#3

Front tire choice is entirely dependent on the soil in which you ride. I find that my favorite for the dry SoCal deserts (ranging from rock to hard pack to DG to sand) so far is the Bridgestone M203. The Dunlop 952 works pretty well on a wide variety of soils, also. The MX51 is better for loamier, damper ground.

The YZF requires that the rider move well forward on the bike when cornering, and also responds well to the heavy use of the rear brake on entry and throttle on exit. If you keep the back end out, the front is much more likely to hold.

  • geshields

Posted May 29, 2013 - 08:46 AM

#4

I use the MX31 for the front tire. The MX51 would either push or knife in on a corner, highly unpredictable. The MX31 for me works on the soft, loamy dirt or hard pack. If it is blue groove, all bets are off.

  • grayracer513

Posted May 29, 2013 - 09:01 AM

#5

GE,

Try the BS M203 once. I ran an MX31 for a while, and it was great for the damp loose dirt on a groomed track, but otherwise not so much. Surprisingly, it sucked like a shop vac in the sand. The MX 51 was better overall, but still not good in the desert. The 203 is working over a much wider variety, and I think if you like the MX31, you'll like the 203 more.

  • rickallen124

Posted May 29, 2013 - 11:26 AM

#6

Isn't it a 203 now? I bought the bridgestone 203(front)/204(rear) combo and am anxious to try it out as I've heard really good things about them.

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  • grayracer513

Posted May 29, 2013 - 12:47 PM

#7

You're correct, it's the M203. I'll fix the error.

  • Greg Pennsiltucky Lykens

Posted May 29, 2013 - 05:40 PM

#8

Trying do get bike to turn better in corners.My cornering speed is rubbish bike seems to push me out wide.have lowered forks.I really like the bike jumps brilliantly.But if i cant fix problem.Thinking about going back to a yz250 2 stroke. CHEERS!!


What the top guys are doing are two things. One I have tried myself I will also give you my take on the problem, but I ain't anything but a 53 year old former Pro who still races every weekend.

First thing people are doing is the Dr D relocation kit. I personally haven't tried it, but I hear it works well.

Second thing , although only some people in the know are doing is shortening the shock about 2 or 3 mm. I did my stock shock 2mm. It tracks well, but I never had problems with this bike to begin with. I did it for a stability issue that I felt on the entrance to very fast sweeping turns. Just the deceleration portion. sometimes I got a little headshake. With this mod, I run my forks flush.

I myself have a couple of newer bikes with Ohlins TTX suspension. That stuff makes it turn like a Suzuki-it carves with precision and still has stability. I got my shock lowered on this stuff too. I have let a couple National Pros ride my bike, and they tell me the same thing.

The Ohlins is machined to such tight tolerances that there is little flex in the forks themselves from the clamp to the axle, at least that is what I am told by Ohlins. the pinch bolts for the axles and the triple clamps are only tightened to 15 N/M, not 15 foot lbs. Much less than stock. So it must be machined at closer tolerances.

Oh, I bought the suspension for bottoming resistance on larger jumps. The turning prowless came as an added benefit.


Now, my take on the turning issues are two things that I see people riding this bike that complain about the turning. One is that they are to low in the power band, and the herky-jerky feeling from the fuel injections messes up the balance. Also, I feel some people just don't brake hard enough and get the front end to stick, then turn the power on and off at the initiation of the turn. That herkey-jerkeyness upsets the balance of the bike.

Just my take on this. Hope this helps.

Edited by Greg Pennsiltucky Lykens, May 30, 2013 - 05:09 PM.


  • bigj450

Posted May 29, 2013 - 07:38 PM

#9

I run a mx51 with drd relocation kit, forks up 5mm in the clamps, works well for me, can somebody explain the idea of shortening the shock? is this to lower bike in the rear therefore altering head angle?? or am I missing it completely....

  • YZF MAD

Posted May 29, 2013 - 11:33 PM

#10

Thanks for the feedback and good advice.I am going to start expermenting with what you guys have sugested.I think i will keep her for a while yet.And try and get her sorted out and me.she has done 80 hours,how many hours do you recomend before i replace piston and rings.I also have got myself a power tuner that i have loaded on some maps.It is a cool tool that makes a real differance...CHEERS :thumbsup:

  • Greg Pennsiltucky Lykens

Posted May 30, 2013 - 05:04 PM

#11

I run a mx51 with drd relocation kit, forks up 5mm in the clamps, works well for me, can somebody explain the idea of shortening the shock? is this to lower bike in the rear therefore altering head angle?? or am I missing it completely....


Same thing as cutting the subframe that all the pros used to do. This lowers the back end of the bike, and therefore, a lower Cg and a little more stability.

That being said, if you look at a real SX or outdoor track, turning isn't as big an issue as with local racing. In Sx, most of the corners, although not all, are banked to some degree. A track like Huston, I think had some tight inside lines that most of the bikes and riders found difficult. The race was the one were Dungey nearly caught Vill by going to a longer outside line. MX is all about keeping momentum now. Most of the tracks have deep, deep berms and ruts, so stability is a premium. Remember, at a national, they seldom turn on flat ground like you would find at a local race. Especially local tracks that run quads with the bikes. Therefore they would have very little of this, so the bikes never experience this behavior when they ride.

Pros seldom turn on flat bankless turns. If it is flat, they have a berm or rut to push off of.

  • Greg Pennsiltucky Lykens

Posted May 30, 2013 - 05:15 PM

#12

Thanks for the feedback and good advice.I am going to start expermenting with what you guys have sugested.I think i will keep her for a while yet.And try and get her sorted out and me.she has done 80 hours,how many hours do you recomend before i replace piston and rings.I also have got myself a power tuner that i have loaded on some maps.It is a cool tool that makes a real differance...CHEERS :thumbsup:


I have an old 2010 that I rode a lot for practice after I was done racing it. I got about 130 hours on it and changed out the cam chain and piston and rings. The piston, except for the carbon looked new. It had virtually no wear. I never ever had to adjust the valves on it . I never opened it up to check them until I put a piston in it. I measured all 4 valves and they were in spec. I only changed out the pieces so as to avoid a big failure down the road.

It has always started well, so I never checked the valves. I think the filter location and changing the oil, probably 100 times (no lie) helped with the wear.

When I road Honda, I had to put intakes in it every 25 hours, because once they move, they are done. I knew they moved once it was a little harder to start. Hope this helps.

  • YZF MAD

Posted May 30, 2013 - 07:59 PM

#13

I have an old 2010 that I rode a lot for practice after I was done racing it. I got about 130 hours on it and changed out the cam chain and piston and rings. The piston, except for the carbon looked new. It had virtually no wear. I never ever had to adjust the valves on it . I never opened it up to check them until I put a piston in it. I measured all 4 valves and they were in spec. I only changed out the pieces so as to avoid a big failure down the road.

It has always started well, so I never checked the valves. I think the filter location and changing the oil, probably 100 times (no lie) helped with the wear.

When I road Honda, I had to put intakes in it every 25 hours, because once they move, they are done. I knew they moved once it was a little harder to start. Hope this helps.

Thanks for the advice,Going out this weekend with my sons so will have a play with the settings on forks.i am running kenda sandwicks frount and back.will rip them off after weekend and try some diff tires CHEERS!!!!





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