How To: '12 WR450 Taillight & Start/Kill Switch



22 replies to this topic
  • DuncR6

Posted April 16, 2013 - 09:31 AM

#1

I searched but didn't find anything so I thought I would start contributing to this forum. You'll have to deal with the picture quality since I took them with my phone. Many thanks to Armenian for putting up with me PMing him trying to get some initial data and questions answered.

Background:
I just picked up a 2012 WR450 last Tuesday. It will be used for dual-sport and then I'll convert it to ride street as well. I'm very particular with installations and always go the extra mile because nothing beats a clean/quality install. The first project was getting the brake light to function and I also think it's stupid that Yamaha puts two different buttons for starting and killing the engine. One switch assembly is much cleaner than two. If you're like me then a good quality aftermarket part is hard to find to do exactly what you want. They always seem to look/act cheap or just don't offer the functionality you're looking for. Not only that, but many aftermarket parts are very expensive. OEM is great to use not only because it's tried and true, but if something breaks then parts are very easy to find.
Goal:
- Have a functioning brake light
- Condense the start/kill buttons into one assembly
- Save money by not buying aftermarket parts. The pricing for the Baja stuff is insanely high, and frankly I think it looks like junk.
- Create a setup that appears OEM and uses OEM parts

Parts Needed:
- (1) 2008-13 Yamaha R6 front master cyclinder
- (1) 2008-13 Yamaha R6 right side hand control
- I chose the R6 parts because I have an '08 R6 so I was able to test fit the pieces before buying them and knew they'd work perfectly.

The R6 master cylinder is a Brembo 16x19. I didn't confirm the 19 because someone told me that number, but the 16 value is accurate. This setup should fit within the Cycra Probends but they haven't arrived yet.

Step 1 (mount the switch):
I'm skipping to about 1/2 way through the install. I'm hoping it's obvious enough how to remove the stock master cylinder as well as the stock start/kill switches. If not then the kill switch plugs into a rectangular 2-pin gray plug mounted to the left of the speedometer. The start switch plugs into a triangular 3-pin black plug mounted right behind the brake side radiator.

The R6 switch assembly has a plastic locating pin. Put some grease or something that will mark the bar when you place it in the mounting position. To do this I first did a dry fitment by installed the master cylinder and the switch. Then when sitting on the bike I rotated the switch to get the right angle. Leaving the master untouched, apply a little grease to the locating pin and place it back in the same position you just had. The picture below shows where you need to drill.

Use a center punch before trying to drill on your bar. Use a 7/32" drill bit (colbalt drill bits are very helpful to use instead of regular high-speed metal ones) and just be careful. You only need to make a dimple the same depth as the locating pin so don't do crazy and drill all the way through the bar lol. You can clean up the edge on the hole with a dremel or utility knife.

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Step 2 (determine your +/- wires):
As you can see below, the R6 switch assembly has 4 wires inside of it. The kill switch consists of a (12v+) red w/white stripe and a (-) red w/black stripe. The start switch is a (12v+) blue w/white stripe and a (-) solid black. Two additional wires are just outside of the switch housing which are a (constant 12v+) brown wire and a (switched 12v+) green w/yellow stripe wire.


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[color=#ff0000]Start Switch:[/color]
So what this all means is that you need to get a wire with a constant 12v+ supply and connect it to both the brown and blue wires. The start switch connector on the WR is 3-pin. One wire is a constant 12v and the other is a ground. The 3rd pin is empty from the factory, but this makes a great place to pass the taillight wire through (it's probably that same way on the street legal versions). In the picture below you will see 2 blue wires. There are actually 3 wires, since I was finished at this point but you can't see the 3rd wire for the taillight. For me the 12v wire in the 3-pin connector was on the right side (or closest to the engine), but I suggest using a multimeter to be sure.

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[color=#FF0000]Kill Switch:[/color]
The kill switch is just as easy since it's a 2 wire connection. For me the 12v supply was the pin in the gray connector that was closest to the front tire (I think). I took that wire and connected it to the red w/stripe in the R6 assembly and the kill switch ground to the red w/black stripe.

Below is how I connected all the wires together. Butt connectors are basically the devil, don't take the easy way out and solder it for a quality connection.

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Finished harness:
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The tubing slips over the wires and goes up to the connector so you don't see the wires at all:
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Out back for the taillight. There's the green wire again:
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Finished product, that's about as OEM as you're going to get. I wasn't able to order any levers yet as I wasn't even sure if this would work. ASV C6 short levers will be going on it though:
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The reservoir isn't mounted yet because I'm waiting on the following item to get here in a couple days:
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The stock brake lines will work with this setup, but you have to rotate the hose connecting to the master cylinder 90 degree. It will not cause a kink in the stock line. Also not pictured are the brake lines that haven't arrived yet. I bought some Fren Tubo Type 4 lines and had them custom rotate the master cylinder fitting for that 90 degree difference. Carbon fiber braided lines (have them already on the R6)....fantastic lines:
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In the end I think this looks pretty OEM since you can't see any connections or spare wires. The best part is it costed $182 shipped for everything. Although there is still time for me to hate this because I haven't added fluid or taken it for a test ride to try out the feel of the master cylinder. I'll update this again once I give it a try. The only other issue is that due to the way the kill switch is design internally, the operation is backward according to the symbols printed on it. Minor price to pay, but could be fixed using a relay....I just don't care that much about it.

The OEM taillight output is pretty disappointing when it lights up though, well actually it's plain old pathetic. I'm going to make one that has more lumens and will post about that later.

Hopefully this helps someone else in the future. I have another How To that I'm going to start working on in about a week. It will take some time because I have to design it in AutoCAD first. Definitely can't wait to show everyone this next one!

Edited by DuncR6, April 16, 2013 - 09:37 AM.


  • EdgeR6

Posted April 16, 2013 - 04:06 PM

#2

So the tail light is not function as a brake light. Thats pretty retarted, Is that why you changed out the master cylinder? Have you done anything to the rear master cylinder to make the brake light work with that? . Nice write up, But why didn't you look at wr250x parts. Thats what I'm going to look at first. I have lots of R6 stuff laying around my self. And hopeing my buddy has an extra R6 switch. But I have a GSXR master cylinder that I used on my 04 with a steal line allready attached and bleed for from my 04. BTW I think all those switches are the same from R6 r1 fz1 and so on. Kind of supprised its not plug and play for the most part.

  • DuncR6

Posted April 17, 2013 - 06:06 AM

#3

1.) So the tail light is not function as a brake light. Thats pretty retarted, Is that why you changed out the master cylinder? 2.) Have you done anything to the rear master cylinder to make the brake light work with that? . Nice write up, 3.) But why didn't you look at wr250x parts. Thats what I'm going to look at first. I have lots of R6 stuff laying around my self. And hopeing my buddy has an extra R6 switch. But I have a GSXR master cylinder that I used on my 04 with a steal line allready attached and bleed for from my 04. BTW I think all those switches are the same from R6 r1 fz1 and so on. Kind of supprised its not plug and play for the most part.

1.) I know right? I assume it's because it is designated as off-road use only from the factory. However even if you're out on the trails the brake light should work to warn others. The tail light is already wired for it and the connectors have provisions, but they just didn't run the the wiring. Yamaha really dropped the ball on that stupid idea. So yes that is why I changed the master cylinder since I could kill two birds with one stone; a big upgrade from the stock WR master cylinder and also get a brake switch. Another reason was that I wasn't enthused about using a hydraulic brake switch.

2.) I did not touch the rear master cylinder. When on the road I rarely if ever use the rear brake. Then while on dirt I only use the rear brake when going down hills just to be more controlled. But either way I'm always using the front so I didn't really care enough to put effort into the rear master cylinder.

3.) That bike didn't even cross my mind. My background is with the R6 and since it's also in the garage I can just pull parts off to test fit and see if they'll work before I go buy them. You're probably right though the switches are likely the same between the bikes. I'm finding a lot of surprising similarities between the WR and the R6 in terms of parts that will fit both bikes.

After I tackle the terrible headlight setup from the factory, I'm going to work on converting the shifting on the WR. I want it to be GP shift like the R6....just bought the parts for that lol.

  • EdgeR6

Posted April 17, 2013 - 08:31 AM

#4

I'm interested to know how you are going to GP shift the WR. I have been rolling on GP shift for a long time and this past weekend I almost missed a few shifts because of it. When I look at the Lever for the WR I did not see a practical way to GP shift any of the off road bikes.

I'm the same as far as back ground Tacked my R6 and Street R1 but I gave both up for now Didn't ride the R1 as much as I liked so I sold it. The r6 05 was getting up there in miles and I did not want to deal with it anymore. Plus I found out that putting a WR on the track is so much more fun and makes a lot of people mad when they can't corner with you, but can pass you in the straights.

I have a 75 Wing for the street now so I saw my self riding the R1 less and less, Loved the bike as it was an 09 Raven, quick shifter pc5 Graves 3/4 exhaust and some other show bits. but all I ever did was look at it in the garage, had 1500 miles on it when I sold it.

  • GP1K

Posted April 17, 2013 - 08:54 AM

#5

ackle the terrible headlight setup from the factory, I'm going to work on converting the shifting on the WR. I want it to be GP shift like the R6....just bought the parts for that lol.


Why in the world would you want GP shift on a dirt bike?? The reason people use GP shift on road racing bikes simply does not apply to dirt bikes. I always ran GP shift on my old race bike and street/sport bikes, but never on dirt bikes or dual sport. Not to mention it would be a PITA as the shifter just comes right off the tranny with no linkage etc.

  • DuncR6

Posted April 17, 2013 - 09:11 AM

#6

I'm interested to know how you are going to GP shift the WR. I have been rolling on GP shift for a long time and this past weekend I almost missed a few shifts because of it.

Why in the world would you want GP shift on a dirt bike?? The reason people use GP shift on road racing bikes simply does not apply to dirt bikes. I always ran GP shift on my old race bike and street/sport bikes, but never on dirt bikes or dual sport. Not to mention it would be a PITA as the shifter just comes right off the tranny with no linkage etc.

The splined lever that connects to the R6 shaft fits on the WR. So I bought the left rearset that included all the shifting pieces from another R6. It's going to take some fabrication though to make it work. The hardest part is going to get the shift peg mounted and sized correctly so it is protected and also doesn't interfere with any other bolts.

I want GP shift because I have it on my R6. I'd rather have both bike the same so I don't forget sometime and shift the wrong way. I've unfortunately done just that on the R6 after riding a dirt bike the previous weekend. Shifted from 2 to 1 near the rev limiter. Wasn't happy about that. Plus to me GP shifting is so much more comfortable no matter if I'm on the track or just cruising down the road. I agree that it's going to be a PITA and will take some work, but to me it's worth it. That's how much I hate regular shifting.

Edited by DuncR6, April 17, 2013 - 09:14 AM.


  • GP1K

Posted April 17, 2013 - 02:37 PM

#7

The splined lever that connects to the R6 shaft fits on the WR. So I bought the left rearset that included all the shifting pieces from another R6. It's going to take some fabrication though to make it work. The hardest part is going to get the shift peg mounted and sized correctly so it is protected and also doesn't interfere with any other bolts.

I want GP shift because I have it on my R6. I'd rather have both bike the same so I don't forget sometime and shift the wrong way. I've unfortunately done just that on the R6 after riding a dirt bike the previous weekend. Shifted from 2 to 1 near the rev limiter. Wasn't happy about that. Plus to me GP shifting is so much more comfortable no matter if I'm on the track or just cruising down the road. I agree that it's going to be a PITA and will take some work, but to me it's worth it. That's how much I hate regular shifting.


Well I'm 100% with you on a sport bike, I always ran GP shift and wouldn't want it any other way, street or track. But it just doesn't translate the same in the dirt. Take a big gnarly hill climb for example, where you might have to grab a downshift on the way up... that's tough to do if you need to move your foot out to get under the shifter, vs just kicking it down a gear.

I honestly never had a problem going back and forth, so long as it was dirt vs sport bike. By that I mean I could literally hop off my old Gixxer with GP shift and ride off on my DRZ or dirt bike with standard shift and not even think about it, and never miss a shift. To me, sport bike = GP shift, dirt bike = standard shift. What would mess me up was riding someone else's sport bike with standard shift. Then I'd have to consciously think about my shifting or I'd shift GP style. But riding a dirt bike feels so different than a sport bike that the different shift patterns just feel natural on each. YMMV

  • SurfaceToAir

Posted April 17, 2013 - 04:28 PM

#8

I am going to go a similar route to what you have done. Though I am using a switch off a 2013 WRF250R ( the dual sport bike ). Its about $50.00.

I am in the process of wiring up a dual sport kit for my 2008 WRF 450 which already has two separate switches for kill and starter, AND an ignition button. And I am adding a keyed switch, making the current ignition switch redundant. Too many switches..

Since I need to relocate the kill switch which is in the way of the new light & horn switch AND I want to replace the current ignition switch with a new key switch - this makes sense to do. The new switch (I hope ) will be less trouble to wire in than the R6 switch.- though the *look* like they are the same switch in the pictures??

cheers-
Dustin

Attached Thumbnails

  • 2013 Yamaha WR250R Dual Purpose Bike - 2012 Salon National du Quad - Laval Off Road Vehicle Show - YouTube.jpg

Edited by SurfaceToAir, April 17, 2013 - 04:36 PM.


  • EdgeR6

Posted April 17, 2013 - 04:41 PM

#9

Why in the world would you want GP shift on a dirt bike?? The reason people use GP shift on road racing bikes simply does not apply to dirt bikes. I always ran GP shift on my old race bike and street/sport bikes, but never on dirt bikes or dual sport. Not to mention it would be a PITA as the shifter just comes right off the tranny with no linkage etc.

Because when u throw on some sport bike tires and go out and run the short courses. track days and watch as 600s and 1000s try to out brake and out corner u it so much fun after they just worked there ass off to catch back up to u in the straights.

  • DuncR6

Posted April 18, 2013 - 05:00 AM

#10

I am going to go a similar route to what you have done. Though I am using a switch off a 2013 WRF250R ( the dual sport bike ). Its about $50.00.

I am in the process of wiring up a dual sport kit for my 2008 WRF 450 which already has two separate switches for kill and starter, AND an ignition button. And I am adding a keyed switch, making the current ignition switch redundant. Too many switches..

Since I need to relocate the kill switch which is in the way of the new light & horn switch AND I want to replace the current ignition switch with a new key switch - this makes sense to do. The new switch (I hope ) will be less trouble to wire in than the R6 switch.- though the *look* like they are the same switch in the pictures??

cheers-
Dustin

Yeah they look exactly the same. I'm also trying to find a key, but the mounting is going to be the most difficult I think. Have you worked that part out yet? For everyone else, yes I know the key won't stop someone from stealing the bike and that's why I have insurance. However, I'm going to have them work for it and not just be able to push a button to take it. Anyways, once I get the keyed ignition I'm going to change the wiring inside of the switch so that the printed symbols won't be the reverse of the actual operation and here's how (assuming the switches are internally the same which I bet they are):

Wire the keyed ignition to the current on/off push button by the speedometer. Then take those same (+/-) wires giving power to the bike and tap them into the kill switch that's on the bars you installed. This will require that the key as well as the kill switch be in the on position before the bike will have power. The start momentary button will be unchanged. Then by flipping the kill switch to the off position you are essentially just turning the bike completely off like you would with the key which is an effective kill switch. This would make the two wires connected to the stock gray connector that operate the stock kill switch unnecessary. Just remove the pins from the gray connector and install the rubber plugs that you removed from the other connectors when running the wire for the tail light. I can't think of good reason why there is even a designated kill switch at all when you can just turn the bike off.

Edited by DuncR6, April 18, 2013 - 05:04 AM.


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  • GP1K

Posted April 18, 2013 - 08:11 AM

#11

Because when u throw on some sport bike tires and go out and run the short courses. track days and watch as 600s and 1000s try to out brake and out corner u it so much fun after they just worked there ass off to catch back up to u in the straights.


Yeah I've taken my DRZ400SM on track days or out on tight twisty roads and rode circles around sport bikes, all with standard shift. Your point?

  • EdgeR6

Posted April 18, 2013 - 04:40 PM

#12

i was trying to say that not everyone just runs in the dirt. i read something some where that the shifting direction does not provide an advantage or disadvantage one way or the other. it's rider prefrence. u have to shift up and down no matter what u ride or how you ride.

  • SurfaceToAir

Posted April 18, 2013 - 09:18 PM

#13

I removed the ignition button and its bracket, and am in the process of making a new bracket ( simple L shaped metal- rounded for pretty corders, etc ) that the key switch mounts through and the head light bolts to. Its all tucked in behind the light and pretty much all you get on the 2013 WRF dual sport anyway. I too take the opinion its just a deterrent. But the key will also help me remember to not leave it on all night.

I do think a tiny hidden kill switch will get installed. Airbox, behind radiator, someplace. Not sure.

When out in places where the bike will be left alone for a while, I plan to chain it up- with a chastity belt.

I've been down this road before with my FJ40. If someone wants it bad enough- they will get it regardless of what I do. Can't sweat it too hard.

cheers-
Dustin

Edited by SurfaceToAir, April 18, 2013 - 09:18 PM.


  • GP1K

Posted April 19, 2013 - 08:06 AM

#14

i was trying to say that not everyone just runs in the dirt. i read something some where that the shifting direction does not provide an advantage or disadvantage one way or the other. it's rider prefrence. u have to shift up and down no matter what u ride or how you ride.


There's a very logical and practical reason people run GP shift on roadracing/sport bikes, namely if you're at max lean in a left hand corner and need to grab an upshift on the way out, your toe isn't under the shifter where it might drag, or worse get caught between the track and your footpeg and really ruin your day. And most downshifting is done under hard braking while the bike is straight up and down. None of that applies in the dirt. So yes there is an advantage to GP shift for racing. There is no advantage to GP shift on a dirt bike, and in fact it's a disadvantage. Like I said before, trying grabbing a downshift on a gnarly hill climb with GP shift.

And yes I've ridden both sport/track and dirt bikes, my sport bikes were always GP shift, and my dirt/dual sport bikes always standard shift. I've never had a problem with going back and forth, it's called knowing how to ride and being able to adapt. I've got plenty of buddies that race and/or do track days and ride dirt, and almost all run GP shift on their track bikes NONE of them run GP shift on their dirt bikes.

Most roadracers run GP shift, but not all, some prefer standard. But go find ONE SINGLE pro dirt/offroad racer that runs GP shift... go on, I'll wait.

  • DuncR6

Posted April 19, 2013 - 09:34 AM

#15

it's called knowing how to ride and being able to adapt. I've got plenty of buddies that race and/or do track days and ride dirt, and almost all run GP shift on their track bikes NONE of them run GP shift on their dirt bikes.

Most roadracers run GP shift, but not all, some prefer standard. But go find ONE SINGLE pro dirt/offroad racer that runs GP shift... go on, I'll wait.

I was just going to sit back and not respond to this entire back and forth about shifting because it's a pointless argument, but the bolded is where I draw the line. GTFO with that "oh you don't know how to ride" crap. This isn't a pissing contest. I honestly couldn't care less if any pro dirt riders do or don't do GP. They do what works for them, and I don't do things just because others are doing it....I do what works for me. I hate standard shift that's all that matters /argument.

Edited by DuncR6, April 19, 2013 - 09:34 AM.


  • GP1K

Posted April 19, 2013 - 10:37 AM

#16

I was just going to sit back and not respond to this entire back and forth about shifting because it's a pointless argument, but the bolded is where I draw the line. GTFO with that "oh you don't know how to ride" crap. This isn't a pissing contest. I honestly couldn't care less if any pro dirt riders do or don't do GP. They do what works for them, and I don't do things just because others are doing it....I do what works for me. I hate standard shift that's all that matters /argument.


Ok so why did you switch to GP shift on your R6 in the first place then? Do you race or do track days? I switched to GP shift when I started racing, and my more experienced buddies explained the advantages for roadracing, so I did it and never looked back. What did standard shift ever do to you that you hate it so much?

There's a reason lots of pros use GP shift road racing, just like there's a reason NO pros use GP shift on dirt bikes. Maybe you'll figure that out on your own eventually.

  • DuncR6

Posted April 19, 2013 - 11:19 AM

#17

Ok so why did you switch to GP shift on your R6 in the first place then? Do you race or do track days? I switched to GP shift when I started racing, and my more experienced buddies explained the advantages for roadracing, so I did it and never looked back. What did standard shift ever do to you that you hate it so much?

Yes. And like I said, standard feels terrible to me. I know the reasons for having each shifting pattern as well.

Edited by DuncR6, April 19, 2013 - 11:25 AM.


  • jksull

Posted May 05, 2013 - 05:48 AM

#18

ASV C6 short [color=#FF0000][background=rgb(255, 255, 0)]levers[/background][/color] will be going on it though:



Have you installed the ASV levers?
How do you like them?
How do they fit?



I have been looking at shorty clutch levers still not sure which one to buy.

  • SurfaceToAir

Posted May 05, 2013 - 05:07 PM

#19

ok... I have the on off/ starter switch now and was wiring it up. I hoped that I could wire the new kill switch into the stock kill switch circuit, but they are wired opposite configurations. The stock switch closes the connection when the button is pressed ( current flows between wires ) . The new one opens the connection when in the off ( power does not flow ). So, I am not going to use the stock kill wires at all now, and instead will put the new kill switch in the stock ignition circuit, inline my keyed switch.

( bike ignition always hot + ) -> keyed switch -> new switch shown above -> bike ignition switched hot.

I guess that is what you did, but without the key switch? And what you were talking about in my previous reply.

If I wanted to use the stock kill switch circuit, then I would have to run the handlebar switch in off mode for the bike to run :/


I could not figure out a way to modify the switch internally to *flip* the way the configuration of the switch.

I think the new switch 'off' is practical for times when you want a quick way to kill the ignition. It's visible and fast to find. Like if I eat it hard and someone runs up to kill the ignition- they will see that before they key.

cheers-
Dustin

  • DuncR6

Posted May 06, 2013 - 06:34 AM

#20

Have you installed the ASV levers?
How do you like them?
How do they fit?

I have been looking at shorty clutch levers still not sure which one to buy.

They are on backorder and should be arriving around May 16th (give or take a few days). I do have them on my R6 though, and that's why I bought them again. The fit is flawless on the R6 so I have no worries that the C6 series for the WR will be any different....the brake lever is actually going to be for a TRX450R master cylinder. The R6 master felt a little too firm so I am swapping it out for the Honda one that's not as aggressive. The main reason why I like them so much is the huge amount of adjustability. As for the R6 most levers (ex. Pazzos) only have 6 points of adjustment. That's way too "macro" of a design for me. The whole reason for buying adjustable levers is to, well, adjust them lol. So it's a pretty easy decision for me to buy the ASVs since they offer WAY more points of a adjustment.

I hoped that I could wire the new kill switch into the stock kill switch circuit, but they are wired opposite configurations.

I could not figure out a way to modify the switch internally to *flip* the way the configuration of the switch.

I will be fixing this write up so the switch operation is reversed and it won't change the internals of the switch. I will try to get to it this before Thursday of this week. If I don't it could be another week before I can finish it. I have parts for a tail light project that should be delivered on Thursday and that needs to be finished ASAP so I can go on a dual sport ride on the 18th. I've been biting my tongue and can't wait to make a thread about the tail! Then it's onto tackling the headlight lol. Anyways, the solution to the switch is going to involve adding a relay. I think I have the diagram drawn out correctly to get this all to work and will be picking up a relay today after work.

Edited by DuncR6, May 06, 2013 - 08:08 AM.





 
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