What year Honda front brake pads fit a 2010 YZ450F?


17 replies to this topic
  • smokingtz

Posted April 08, 2013 - 05:29 PM

#1

Looking for a little more bite and want to try the Honda pads.

  • slothman

Posted April 09, 2013 - 03:37 PM

#2

LOL are you kidding me dude? Get use the CORRECT pads which would be YAMAHA. You can't buy Honda pads and hope they fit/work. If your bike isn't stopping like it should, you probably need new brake fluid. Or you have air in the system.

  • rwebb35

Posted April 09, 2013 - 04:12 PM

#3

Agree with Slothman on the Honda pads! Try the EBC Extreme Pro pads. Not cheap @ $70 a set, but worth the money. They work! I use Tusk oversize rotors on my Yamis with great success. Only $120! Then on top of that use the extreme pro pads and you got brakes as strong or stronger than KTM! Geez I'm getting to old to give away my speed secrets!

  • f150jokerstyle

Posted April 09, 2013 - 04:43 PM

#4

Looking for a little more bite and want to try the Honda pads.


Not sure on what year bike your talking about but on the older YZ's you reroute your front break line to the Honda CR style. Rocky mountain sells conversions for this I know for my bike it's an 03. From what I'v been told this routing has less bends in it/less over all length because of the less bends so you get less pressure loss. Thus a sharper harder grabbing front break. I personally like a weak front break my self, It saves me from washing out in some of the O **** moments.

Never mind I just realized you stated 2010 in the title :bonk:

Edited by f150jokerstyle, April 09, 2013 - 04:44 PM.


  • grayracer513

Posted April 10, 2013 - 06:25 AM

#5

LOL are you kidding me dude?


No, he's not kidding you dude. CRF pads are one of the best cures for lackluster braking performance in the front brakes on the YZF, and have been for 10 years at least. The question was which of the CRF pads fit the smaller calipers used on the '08 and later YZF's. I would say '09 and later on the CRF, but I haven't tried (I don't find anything disagreeable about the stock brakes).

  • slothman

Posted April 10, 2013 - 07:07 AM

#6

No, he's not kidding you dude. CRF pads are one of the best cures for lackluster braking performance in the front brakes on the YZF, and have been for 10 years at least. The question was which of the CRF pads fit the smaller calipers used on the '08 and later YZF's. I would say '09 and later on the CRF, but I haven't tried (I don't find anything disagreeable about the stock brakes).


I would say the caliper is going to have a greater affect on performance, more so than a STOCK honda pad. JMO ...

  • grayracer513

Posted April 10, 2013 - 07:18 AM

#7

The calipers used on the '06 CRF and the '06 YZ450 were identical Aisin parts. Honda used a different master cylinder and brake pad compound during that period, both of which improved the braking performance of the YZF when used. They still do use a linkage type lever and different bore specs on the master, but what I don't know is what they've done with the caliper. It seems likely that they would go with the same smaller unit as Yamaha to save the weight, and that would probably have happened no later than '09, but I don't know for certain.

I do know that people have swapped Honda components onto the later YZF's and been pleased with the results.

  • yz133rider

Posted April 10, 2013 - 07:30 AM

#8

Ride engineering sells a billet caliper with larger pistons and stiffer design to reduce flexing which gives all the force to braking instead of twisting.

It is designed for all bikes EXCEPT Yamaha. Yamaha specs a smaller and weaker master cylinder. I have installed an oversized rotor on my yz and while the braking force is strong enough I like a much stiffer lever then I have been able to get. I did a stainless line in the past on another yz and still wasn't content. Im thinking the master cylinder is the main culprit.

Any tips regarding which master cylinder to choose? Ktm? Honda? Which year? Any tips on what it would require to make work is it just plug and play.

Ive always heard the Honda pads trick as well. The ebc pro pad sounds promising but oem parts generally seem to last the longest with brakes for me so maybe oem Honda is a good choice.

  • yz133rider

Posted April 10, 2013 - 07:32 AM

#9

I just wanted to add that the reason the ride engineering caliper doesn't work is the Yamaha master cylinder can't handle pushing the larger pistons. So it definitely seems to me the master cylinder is a real weak spot.

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  • slothman

Posted April 10, 2013 - 08:48 AM

#10

well, to each his own. I prefer not to use the brakes, and twist the throttle ;)

  • grayracer513

Posted April 10, 2013 - 10:56 AM

#11

I just wanted to add that the reason the ride engineering caliper doesn't work is the Yamaha master cylinder can't handle pushing the larger pistons. So it definitely seems to me the master cylinder is a real weak spot.

Here is what you're missing in referring to smaller master cylinders as "weaker". Hydraulic systems have leverage ratios just like mechanical gearing or levers do. When using cylinders and pistons for both the pressure source and the driven member of the system, as brakes do, it can be calculated by comparing the area of the master cylinder piston to that of the slave. Say that a master cylinder with an area of 1.3 cm² has 40 pounds of pressure applied to the rod. This will produce 40 psi of hydraulic pressure. If this feeds into a caliper with a piston area of 7 cm², the hydraulic pressure will still be 40 psi, but the output pressure will rise from the 40 pounds applied to 218 pounds because the hydraulic pressure is applied to a greater area. The 30mm piston in the caliper (in this example) is 5.44 times as large as the master cylinder, so that becomes the "gear ratio" of the system.

Using a smaller master cylinder bore, then, increases the leverage, putting more pressure on the pads than the larger one. Like other levers, increasing the advantage the input has over the output also means that the input side has to move farther to move the output by any given amount, just as the engine has to spin faster in a lower gear to go a given speed.

One of the differences in the Honda master cylinder is the leverage ratio of the lever itself, which increases the pressure applied to the MC piston.

  • yz133rider

Posted April 10, 2013 - 12:17 PM

#12

Maybe thats the main difference then in the feel at the lever? Ive heard many reports of am improved feel with swapping to a Honda mc.
What's your suggestion for getting a stiffer brake lever feel?

  • gimped up

Posted April 10, 2013 - 12:33 PM

#13

Not sure on what year bike your talking about but on the older YZ's you reroute your front break line to the Honda CR style. Rocky mountain sells conversions for this I know for my bike it's an 03. From what I'v been told this routing has less bends in it/less over all length because of the less bends so you get less pressure loss. Thus a sharper harder grabbing front break. I personally like a weak front break my self, It saves me from washing out in some of the O **** moments.

Never mind I just realized you stated 2010 in the title :bonk:


Lmao less pressure from longer hose???? Don't know hydraulics?
If system is bleed out correctly should not matter length. Get quality fluid and make sure the caliper moves freely. Its the minor details that make a big difference in brake systems. remember the phrase KISS.
Keep it simple stupid. Goes a long way in mechanics. Good luck

  • grayracer513

Posted April 10, 2013 - 01:20 PM

#14

The issue with the longer brake hose was not pressure loss. The hose is slightly "springy", which is to say that some of your effort goes to expanding the hose when you squeeze the lever. The longer the hose, the more there is to "blow up", which is why the shorter hose gives a less spongy feel.

The bends have nothing to do with it, especially with a disc brake, since fluid does not move through the hose in any significant amount with brakes of this type.

  • rotax800

Posted April 10, 2013 - 01:37 PM

#15

well, to each his own. I prefer not to use the brakes, and twist the throttle ;)

Didn't anyone ever tell you, The more you use your brakes, the faster you go.

  • f150jokerstyle

Posted April 10, 2013 - 03:48 PM

#16

Lmao less pressure from longer hose???? Don't know hydraulics?
If system is bleed out correctly should not matter length. Get quality fluid and make sure the caliper moves freely. Its the minor details that make a big difference in brake systems. remember the phrase KISS.
Keep it simple stupid. Goes a long way in mechanics. Good luck

The issue with the longer brake hose was not pressure loss. The hose is slightly "springy", which is to say that some of your effort goes to expanding the hose when you squeeze the lever. The longer the hose, the more there is to "blow up", which is why the shorter hose gives a less spongy feel.

The bends have nothing to do with it, especially with a disc brake, since fluid does not move through the hose in any significant amount with brakes of this type.


This is what I was trying to get at and I failed miserably. The only reason I brought up the bends is to illustrate the added length needed to make them. Thanks Grey for interpreting my lack luster attempt. As far as knowing hydraulics I have not worked on any in around 5 years and I can honestly say I was no master at it then, it was mostly R & R hoses and rebuilding cylinders and valves I was not engineering anything. About the only hydraulics I deal with any more is with fuel systems. Yes I know same principals apply. Thank you for your added luck as the old saying goes "Better to be lucky than good" :thumbsup:

  • Jim813

Posted April 10, 2013 - 07:19 PM

#17

I used Honda pads out of a 2006 CRF450 on my 08 YZ450 with no issues. And yes, they are an improvement and work well.

I ended up with an EBC oversize rotor, Honda master cylinder, and Honda brake pads on my 08 450. The end result was a firmer feel at the lever, more progression when braking, and higher overall stopping power. On wet dirt I wouldn't mind a bit more power, but in the dry desert it works very well.

Edited by Jim813, April 10, 2013 - 07:23 PM.


  • smokingtz

Posted April 13, 2013 - 06:26 AM

#18

I got the idea from this forum to run Honda pads. Have EBC reds and they seem to work fine but my lever was spongy even with mega bleeding. Swapped my 03 yz450f master and it's pretty good right now. Much firmer. Will need to replace pads soon so was hoping to put in a proven good pad. Not looking to spend a lot and don't feel the need for a bigger rotor just want the feel to be right. Thanks for all the suggestions..





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