wr 450 stator???



20 replies to this topic
  • icemachines

Posted December 02, 2003 - 06:55 PM

#1

:) Anyone have any success getting out any extra power out the 450 for ie heated grips 18watts. Currently tried a line from the lights, grips don't get really warm and headlight is really affected by RpM. Also tried running direct off the battery, good heat on the warmers but after a couple of hours the battery is drained and the engine starts hesitating.
Any ideas

  • av8shunmeckaneck

Posted October 10, 2004 - 11:16 PM

#2

why not use heated gloves when you ride? much more simple

  • ETP

Posted October 11, 2004 - 05:24 AM

#3

Last I checked, the stator companies were having problem upgrading the 450 stators.
There doesn't appear to be much extra 12 volt power designed into the stock electrical system on the 450's. The system is split into a 12 volt AC circuit for lighting and a 12 volt DC circuit for the rest of the electrical duties. You had your warmers connected to the DC side. If the warmers can run on AC, try the AC lighting circuit. Also, do some searches of this forum on the subject.

  • Indy_WR450

Posted October 11, 2004 - 08:18 AM

#4

Maybe Frostbite might have the answer. He rides his WR450 all year round above the artic circle! Where are you Frostbite! :cry:

  • 5valve

Posted October 11, 2004 - 09:57 AM

#5

I think he is still on a 400

  • Chipstien

Posted October 11, 2004 - 04:33 PM

#6

What are the Wattage ratings of the factory stators for the 400, 426, and 450, respectively. I know my stator can run two 50 watt bulbs with no problem. Is this normal or am I lucky? :cry:

  • rpyfz450

Posted October 12, 2004 - 08:15 AM

#7

Last I checked, the stator companies were having problem upgrading the 450 stators.
There doesn't appear to be much extra 12 volt power designed into the stock electrical system on the 450's.


I've found handguards to work wonderfully in the winter. I can often use riding gloves without getting too cold.

There's a company called trailtech that upgrades your stock stator and rectifier. They also offer CNC machined flywheels in various weights with stronger magnets than OEM. They also will change your stator (swap with core) combined with a full wave rectifier to give you a fully DC electrical system. They've told me this system will power just about any lights you can find.

On the YFZ450 (ATV) a few of us have experienced a problem that appears to exist on all YFZ450ies and WR450Fs. This problem causes the battery to go dead or ignition malfunctions with the headlights turned off. Does this sound like any problem WR450F owners have been faced with?

  • ETP

Posted October 12, 2004 - 05:07 PM

#8

[quote
On the YFZ450 (ATV) a few of us have experienced a problem that appears to exist on all YFZ450ies and WR450Fs. This problem causes the battery to go dead or ignition malfunctions with the headlights turned off. Does this sound like any problem WR450F owners have been faced with?

[/QUOTE]

I haven't heard of anyones WR450 battery drianing with the lights off. I tried running all my DS lighting on the 12 Volt DC curcuit and the battery drained in about two hours of riding. Assuming your setup is stock, you may want to check the charging at your battery while the engine is running at high idle. Try it with the light off, then on. If its stays much lower than 13 volts under any running condition, the battery will likely drain over time.

  • 2grimjim

Posted October 13, 2004 - 07:07 PM

#9

rpyfz450,
Check with your local yamaha dealer about the charging problem with your yfz. I am a service tech at a yamaha dealer and we just reciever a service bulletin (10-09-04)addressing your charging problem. The fix consists of an resistor to replace the headlight(I think, I'll have to read it again) for about $45. Unfortunately it's not a recall issue, so you will have to foot the bill.

  • Indy_WR450

Posted October 14, 2004 - 05:19 AM

#10

This has not been an issue on the WR450's. :cry:

Visit the ThumperTalk Store for the lowest prices on motorcycle / ATV parts and accessories - Guaranteed
  • ddialogue

Posted October 14, 2004 - 05:28 AM

#11

This has not been an issue on the WR450's. :cry:


That's good to know. I've run my HID helmet lights for several hours on my WR450 (wired straight to the battery) and have had no issues.

I'm considering some heated grips for this winter, too, although the heated-glove thing sounds interesting. :cry:

  • ncmountainman

Posted October 14, 2004 - 06:25 AM

#12

i noticed back when i had a battery that in a situation where i would stall alot in a tight section and wore the battery all the way down it would take over an hour of riding to be able to use it again. i thought that was kinda a long time. :cry:

  • 2grimjim

Posted October 14, 2004 - 12:16 PM

#13

The tsb for your yfz is AT2004-007, it explains what the charging problem is and how to fix it. If you are running without the headlight you will need a resistor kit p/n 5TG-REGST-KT-00, it costs $45.

  • rpyfz450

Posted October 19, 2004 - 12:56 PM

#14

The tsb for your yfz is AT2004-007, it explains what the charging problem is and how to fix it. If you are running without the headlight you will need a resistor kit p/n 5TG-REGST-KT-00, it costs $45.


Yes, I'm aware of this. I have one on order. I'm curious to know why the YFZ needs one, but the WR doesn't. The circuit diagrams look the same. Besides, the resistor kit sounds like a band-aid fix.

  • techman

Posted October 20, 2004 - 03:58 PM

#15

Hi Guys,

A likely explanation for the tsb resistor fix is that normally the stator power is divvied up between the lights and the shunt regulator. If you take away the lighting load, the regulator has to dump all the power which might stress it or overload/overheat it (leading to reliability problems). A stressed regulator might not hold the voltage well, possibly affecting other systems. So, adding the resistor takes away the extra load from the regulator, in essence helping it. If the WR had an eg 48 watt headlight bulb, 12V nominal / 48 W = 4 amps and 12V / 4 amps = 3 ohms type performance by the headlight bulb. Run the right numbers and go to a junk store and rig up your own (eg 48W 3 ohm) resistor for probably $10. You would have to give consideration to keeping the resistors cooled by heatsinking to the bike frame or via air flow. If this last calculation and home brew part doesn't seem easy, you should opt for the yamaha kit to avoid creating problems for yourself.

This is a best guess without seeing the tsb. If the tsb puts the resistor from +12V to GND, then my guess is right.

  • rpyfz450

Posted November 04, 2004 - 06:48 AM

#16

This sounds like the explanation I was given. On the WR450F, are you unable to turn off the headlight? Maybe that's the difference betwee the WR and YFZ?

Why would this Yamaha electrical system have such a problem? I've had other machines before that had the same design and they had nothing on the AC circuit except for the stator and rectifier/regulator. Sounds like all systems like this don't require AC-powered accessories to work.


A likely explanation for the tsb resistor fix is that normally the stator power is divvied up between the lights and the shunt regulator. If you take away the lighting load, the regulator has to dump all the power which might stress it or overload/overheat it (leading to reliability problems). A stressed regulator might not hold the voltage well, possibly affecting other systems. So, adding the resistor takes away the extra load from the regulator, in essence helping it. If the WR had an eg 48 watt headlight bulb, 12V nominal / 48 W = 4 amps and 12V / 4 amps = 3 ohms type performance by the headlight bulb. Run the right numbers and go to a junk store and rig up your own (eg 48W 3 ohm) resistor for probably $10. You would have to give consideration to keeping the resistors cooled by heatsinking to the bike frame or via air flow. If this last calculation and home brew part doesn't seem easy, you should opt for the yamaha kit to avoid creating problems for yourself.



  • 450high

Posted November 07, 2004 - 12:19 AM

#17

I have had heated handle bar grips since i bought my 03 wr 450 when they first came out in 2003 they have not missed a beat and have not to date flattened the battery.They are a stick on pad type with a high and low setting.You take your grips off and the stick to the bars then you put the grips back on.I have even swaped bars twice.I just peel them off and restick to new bars.They cost about $45 aus.If you need to know how i wired them up put a post on and will pull the light of to check.I can't remember they have been on that long.They are great on open roads between tracks,but get a bit hot on tight tracks.
Dave

  • TrailTech

Posted November 07, 2004 - 09:24 AM

#18

The 2004-2005 WR450 Stator is a split wound system (as noted above). You can run 70 watts on the AC side and 25 watts on the DC without trouble. If you go over that rating on the AC side you will have dim lights. If you go over that rating on the DC side you will get a dead battery and eventually a bike that will not run. The CDI requires DC power.

The stator can be rewound to put all the power to the DC side. This allows about 100 watts of useable DC power (lights + grip heaters +.... = 100 watts).

If you want more power, swap to a flywheel that overdrives the stator to get to about 150 watts.

A nice thing about swapping the flywheel is you can modify the weight (less for more snap or more for smoother power) and you get a balanced flywheel. The stock WRF450 flywheel is not balanced from Yamaha. A dynamically balanced flywheel makes a VERY noticable difference in how smooth you motor is.

  • ddialogue

Posted November 07, 2004 - 09:55 AM

#19

The 2004-2005 WR450 Stator is a split wound system (as noted above). You can run 70 watts on the AC side and 25 watts on the DC without trouble. If you go over that rating on the AC side you will have dim lights. If you go over that rating on the DC side you will get a dead battery and eventually a bike that will not run. The CDI requires DC power.

The stator can be rewound to put all the power to the DC side. This allows about 100 watts of useable DC power (lights + grip heaters +.... = 100 watts).

If you want more power, swap to a flywheel that overdrives the stator to get to about 150 watts.

A nice thing about swapping the flywheel is you can modify the weight (less for more snap or more for smoother power) and you get a balanced flywheel. The stock WRF450 flywheel is not balanced from Yamaha. A dynamically balanced flywheel makes a VERY noticable difference in how smooth you motor is.


Have the 2004/05 models flywheels changed significantly from the 2003's? I noticed Trail Techs's website only has flywheels for the 04/05 models.

What about power output? Other TTer's have mentioned that the stators can't be rewound on the WR450's (not enough room, or something?) :cry:

Thanks... :cry:

  • rpyfz450

Posted November 07, 2004 - 10:58 AM

#20

The 2004-2005 WR450 Stator is a split wound system (as noted above).


The WR450F does not have a split wound stator/generator. The stator produces AC power only. AC-powered components are powered directly by the stator, DC components get their power from the DC side of the rectifier/regulator.




 
x

Join Our Community!

Even if you don't want to post, registered members get access to tools that make finding & following the good stuff easier.

If you enjoyed reading about "" here in the ThumperTalk archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join ThumperTalk today!

The views and opinions expressed on this page are strictly those of the author, and have not been reviewed or approved by ThumperTalk.